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19th Amendment Centennial - Women's Suffrage
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CC BY
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The Washington State Women's Commission is commemorating the 100th anniversary of the 19th Amendment, which granted women the right to vote. These two videos are intended for educational purposes and to spark discussion about the importance of voting - "A Seat at the Table; Women's Sacred Right to Vote" and "The Untold Stories of Black Women in the Suffrage Movement"

Subject:
U.S. History
Material Type:
Primary Source
Author:
Barbara Soots
Jerry Price
Washington OSPI OER Project
Date Added:
11/18/2019
American Government
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CC BY
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 American Government is designed to meet the scope and sequence requirements of the single-semester American government course. This title includes innovative features designed to enhance student learning, including Insider Perspective features and a Get Connected Module that shows students how they can get engaged in the political process. The book provides an important opportunity for students to learn the core concepts of American government and understand how those concepts apply to their lives and the world around them. American Government includes updated information on the 2016 presidential election.Senior Contributing AuthorsGlen Krutz (Content Lead), University of OklahomaSylvie Waskiewicz, PhD (Lead Editor)

Subject:
Social Science
Political Science
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
Rice University
Provider Set:
OpenStax College
Date Added:
01/06/2016
Capitalism and Political Economy
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CC BY
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This course is an introduction to economics for non-majors and political economy, with an emphasis on the moral and ethical problems that markets solve, and fail to solve. Taught by Professor Michael Munger of Duke University, this course includes full length lectures, links to readings, and a sample final exam.

Subject:
Economics
Political Science
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
Institute for Humane Studies
Author:
Michael Munger
Date Added:
10/31/2017
Chronicling and Mapping the Women's Suffrage Movement
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CC BY
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This lesson brings together digital mapping and the Chronicling America newspaper database as part of an inquiry into how and where the women's suffrage movement took place in the United States. Primary source newspaper articles published between 1911-1920 and maps from 1918-1920 are used to prompt student research into how women organized, the type of elections that women could participate in, and the extent to which the 19th Amendment transformed voting rights in the U.S.

Subject:
History
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
National Endowment for the Humanities
Provider Set:
EDSITEment!
Date Added:
09/06/2019
Condorcet's Paradox: How to Rig a Majority Vote
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Do you think that a majority vote is always the fairest way to reach a consensus? Think again! In this video, Professor Diana Thomas of Creighton University explains that it is very easy for a savvy politician to dictate the winner of a vote using Condorcet’s Paradox.

Subject:
Political Science
Material Type:
Lesson
Provider:
Institute for Humane Studies
Author:
Diana Thomas
Date Added:
09/14/2017
Fannie Lou Hamer and the Civil Rights Movement in Rural Mississippi
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CC BY
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This collection uses primary sources to explore Fannie Lou Hamer and the civil rights movement in rural Mississippi. Digital Public Library of America Primary Source Sets are designed to help students develop their critical thinking skills and draw diverse material from libraries, archives, and museums across the United States. Each set includes an overview, ten to fifteen primary sources, links to related resources, and a teaching guide. These sets were created and reviewed by the teachers on the DPLA's Education Advisory Committee.

Subject:
U.S. History
Women's Studies
Material Type:
Primary Source
Provider:
Digital Public Library of America
Provider Set:
Primary Source Sets
Author:
Jamie Lathan
Date Added:
04/11/2016
The Fifteenth Amendment
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CC BY
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This collection uses primary sources to explore the Fifteenth Amendment. Digital Public Library of America Primary Source Sets are designed to help students develop their critical thinking skills and draw diverse material from libraries, archives, and museums across the United States. Each set includes an overview, ten to fifteen primary sources, links to related resources, and a teaching guide. These sets were created and reviewed by the teachers on the DPLA's Education Advisory Committee.

Subject:
U.S. History
Material Type:
Primary Source
Provider:
Digital Public Library of America
Provider Set:
Primary Source Sets
Author:
Samantha Gibson
Date Added:
04/11/2016
Introduction to Comparative Politics
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CC BY
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Comparative politics is the systematic study and comparison of the world's political systems. The course begins by discussing the factors and categories of analysis that political scientists and important international institutions like the World Bank, NATO, and the United Nations use regularly; it ends by comparing and contrasting governments from five different regions of the world: the Americas, Europe, Africa, Asia, and the Middle East. Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to: Define the chief characteristics of a nation state; Identify and explain various comparative methodologies used to compare various political systems; Distinguish between unitary, federal, and confederal governmental models; Compare and contrast political cultures in selected countries; Compare and contrast political socialization in selected countries; Describe and explain patterns of representation and participation in selected countries; Compare and contrast the roles and functions of political parties in selected countries; Compare and contrast the role of interest groups in selected countries; Identify and explain governance and policy-making in selected countries; Compare and contrast the role of the executive in selected countries; Compare and contrast the role of the judicial branch in selected countries; Compare and contrast the role of the bureaucracy and the policy process in selected countries; Describe and explain the political economy and development in selected countries; Identify and explain political challenges and changing agendas in selected countries. (Political Science 221)

Subject:
Political Science
Material Type:
Assessment
Full Course
Lecture Notes
Reading
Syllabus
Provider:
The Saylor Foundation
Date Added:
11/21/2011
Lecture 21: Cybersecurity - "Hacking Democracy: Election Security"
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CC BY-NC-SA
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Lecture #21 for the course: CS 3550: Cybersecurity - "Hacking Democracy: Election Security". Delivered at Baruch College in Spring 2020 by Michael Whiteman as part of the Tech-in-Residence Corps program.

Subject:
Computer Science
Information Science
Material Type:
Lecture
Provider:
CUNY Academic Works
Provider Set:
Baruch College
Author:
Michael Whiteman
NYC Tech-in-residence Corps
Date Added:
07/17/2020
Lesson 1: 1828 Campaign of Andrew Jackson: Expansion of the Voting Base
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CC BY
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Did changes in state constitutions tend to affect the voting population? In this lesson, students discuss the general trend in the first half of the 19th century to extend the right to vote to more white males.

Subject:
History
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
National Endowment for the Humanities
Provider Set:
EDSITEment!
Date Added:
09/06/2019
Lesson 3: Federalists and Democratic-Republicans: The Platforms They Never Had
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CC BY
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The rivalry between the Federalists and Republicans in the early days of the American Republic was bitter. What were the key positions of the parties? How important to the parties' positions were their basic attitudes toward constitutional interpretation (Federalists, broad interpretation / Democratic-Republicans, strict interpretation)? Which positions of either party resonate in the politics of today?

Subject:
History
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
National Endowment for the Humanities
Provider Set:
EDSITEment!
Date Added:
09/06/2019
The Mathematics of Voting
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CC BY-NC-SA
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The goal of this video lesson is to teach students about new and exciting ways of holding an election that they may not be aware of. Students will learn three different methods of voting: plurality, instant runoff, and the Borda count. They will be led through a voting experiment in which they will see the weakness of plurality when there are three or more candidates. This lesson will show that not every voting system is perfect, and that each has its strengths and weaknesses. It will also promote thought, discussion, and understanding of the various methods of voting.

Subject:
Political Science
Material Type:
Lecture
Provider:
MIT
Provider Set:
MIT Blossoms
Author:
Dr. Andy Felt
Date Added:
06/04/2015
Ms. Noonan: Morning Meeting
Only Sharing Permitted
CC BY-NC-ND
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Madeline Noonan starts every class day with a morning meeting. Students use vocabulary to describe how they're feeling, practice speaking in front of peers, and gain trust by sharing a little about themselves. A daily "greeting" adds a bit of fun.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Language, Grammar and Vocabulary
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Teaching/Learning Strategy
Provider:
Teaching Channel
Provider Set:
Teaching Channel
Author:
Madeline Noonan
Date Added:
11/02/2012
Political behaviour
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CC BY-NC-SA
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This is a module framework. It can be viewed online or downloaded as a zip file.

As taught Autumn Semester 2010/2011.

This module will introduce students to key debates in the study of political behaviour. The module will focus specifically on the core ‘pillars’ of political behaviour (elections, voting, political participation and, to a lesser extent, public opinion). Through the module students will explore theories and methodologies used by political scientists to study these key aspects of political behaviour. Voters, political parties, party members and activists, and forms of political participation more generally will be addressed.

The module will build on the knowledge students might have gained during their undergraduate degrees while introducing them to new debates and literatures. Students will be introduced to, and encouraged to critically assess, major approaches to studying these political phenomena and will gain a firm understanding of the interplay between theory and empirical research.

Module Code: M13128

Suitable for study at: Undergraduate level 3

Credits:20

Dr Matthew Goodwin, School of Politics and International Relations

Dr Matthew Goodwin obtained his BA (First Class Hons) in Politics and Contemporary History at the University of Salford and MA in Political Science at the University of Western Ontario. He completed his PhD at the Department of European Studies and Modern Languages at the University of Bath, under the supervision of Professor Roger Eatwell and Professor Anna Cento Bull. Before being appointed Lecturer at the University of Nottingham, Dr Goodwin was Temporary Lecturer at the University of Bath, Research Associate at the University of Manchester and an ESRC Postdoctoral Research Fellow (Manchester).

At broad level Dr Goddwin's research clusters around electoral behaviour and, to a lesser extent, public policy. His research interests are mainly in extremist political parties and the roots of their support, especially extreme right-wing parties. He also has a strong interest in party membership and activism, and the study of political participation more generally. This research has been published in journals including the European Journal of Political Research, Political Studies and the Journal of Elections, Public Opinion and Parties (JEPOP), among others. Dr Goodwin has also recently co-edited a volume - The New Extremism in 21st Century Britain (Routledge) which explores support for alternative forms of extremism and implications for public policy, police and practice.

Subject:
Social Science
Material Type:
Syllabus
Provider:
University of Nottingham
Author:
Dr Matthew Goodwin
Date Added:
03/24/2017
Politics in 60 seconds. Lowering the voting age
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Professor Philip Cowley defines a political concept in 60 seconds for those with a spare minute to learn something new. This videocast focuses on voting at 16.

Warning: video does contain bloopers and out takes.

May 2010

Suitable for Undergraduate study and Community education

Professor Philip Cowley, Professor of Parliamentary Government, School of Politics and International Relations

Professor Philip Cowley is Professor of Parliamentary Government at The University of Nottingham. He is an expert in British politics, especially political parties, voting and Parliament. His research interests and project activities cover backbench behaviour and dissent in the House of Commons 2001-5 Parliament; research on the current Parliament and issues to do with political engagement, the disconnection between politicians and the public and ideas for parliamentary reform imported from outside the UK.

Professor Philip Cowley has also conducted previous research on moral debates in British politics and the British Conservative Party and studied the behaviour of British MP's since the election of Tony Blair as Prime Minister. He is author of Revolts and Rebellions, Parliamentary Voting under Blair and editor of the British General Election of xxxx series, with Dennis Kavanagha, having taken over from David Butler, after his 50+ years involved in the project.

Subject:
Social Science
Material Type:
Lecture
Provider:
University of Nottingham
Author:
Professor Philip Cowley
Date Added:
03/22/2017
Politics in 60 seconds. Lowering the voting age
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CC BY-SA
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Professor Philip Cowley defines a political concept in 60 seconds for those with a spare minute to learn something new. This videocast focuses on voting at 16.

Warning: video does contain bloopers and out takes.

May 2010

Suitable for Undergraduate study and Community education

Professor Philip Cowley, Professor of Parliamentary Government, School of Politics and International Relations

Professor Philip Cowley is Professor of Parliamentary Government at The University of Nottingham. He is an expert in British politics, especially political parties, voting and Parliament. His research interests and project activities cover backbench behaviour and dissent in the House of Commons 2001-5 Parliament; research on the current Parliament and issues to do with political engagement, the disconnection between politicians and the public and ideas for parliamentary reform imported from outside the UK.

Professor Philip Cowley has also conducted previous research on moral debates in British politics and the British Conservative Party and studied the behaviour of British MP's since the election of Tony Blair as Prime Minister. He is author of Revolts and Rebellions, Parliamentary Voting under Blair and editor of the British General Election of xxxx series, with Dennis Kavanagha, having taken over from David Butler, after his 50+ years involved in the project.

Subject:
Social Science
Material Type:
Lecture
Provider:
University of Nottingham
Author:
Professor Philip Cowley
Date Added:
03/22/2017
Politics in 60 seconds. Voting
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CC BY-NC-SA
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Professor Cees van der Eijk defines a political concept in 60 seconds for those with a spare minute to learn something new. This videocast focuses on voting as a political concept.

Warning: video does contain bloopers and out takes.

May 2010

Suitable for Undergraduate study and Community education

Professor Cees van der Eijk, School of Politics and International Relations

Professor Cees van der Eijk is Professor of Social Science Research Methods, and Director of Social Sciences Methods and Data Institute at the University of Nottingham.

Before joining Nottingham he was Professor of Political Science the University of Amsterdam, following two Lectureships and Readership in Methodology. He has been a Research Fellow at NIAS (Netherlands Institute for Advanced Study in the Social Sciences and Humanities), a Fulbright Fellow at the University of Wisconsin, Madison, and is member-correspondent of the Royal Dutch Academy of Sciences.

Subject:
Social Science
Material Type:
Lecture
Provider:
University of Nottingham
Author:
Professor Cees van der Eijk
Date Added:
03/22/2017
Politics in 60 seconds. Voting
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CC BY-SA
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Professor Cees van der Eijk defines a political concept in 60 seconds for those with a spare minute to learn something new. This videocast focuses on voting as a political concept.

Warning: video does contain bloopers and out takes.

May 2010

Suitable for Undergraduate study and Community education

Professor Cees van der Eijk, School of Politics and International Relations

Professor Cees van der Eijk is Professor of Social Science Research Methods, and Director of Social Sciences Methods and Data Institute at the University of Nottingham.

Before joining Nottingham he was Professor of Political Science the University of Amsterdam, following two Lectureships and Readership in Methodology. He has been a Research Fellow at NIAS (Netherlands Institute for Advanced Study in the Social Sciences and Humanities), a Fulbright Fellow at the University of Wisconsin, Madison, and is member-correspondent of the Royal Dutch Academy of Sciences.

At Amsterdam Professor van der Eijk was Dean of Education, and remains on the Directors Boards of the Amsterdam School of Communication Research and the Dutch Foundation for Electoral Research (SKON). He also serves on the Executive Board for the Social and Behavioral Sciences of NWO (the Dutch National Science Foundation), and was between 1991 and 1996 the President of the Dutch Political Science Association.

He has taught guest lectures or short courses at other universities in the Netherlands, France, Belgium, Ireland, Britain, Germany and the USA, and to government and commercial audiences.

Subject:
Social Science
Material Type:
Lecture
Provider:
University of Nottingham
Author:
Professor Cees van der Eijk
Date Added:
03/22/2017