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Ancient History Encyclopedia
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Ancient History Encyclopedia is a non-profit educational website with a global vision: to provide the best ancient history information on the internet for free.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Ancient History
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Homework/Assignment
Interactive
Reading
Textbook
Provider:
Ancient History Encyclopedia
Provider Set:
Individual Authors
Arch of Titus
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This art history video discussion examines the Arch of Titus, originally Pentelic marble, early 19h-century restoration is in travertine, c. 81 C.E. (Via Sacra, Rome).

Subject:
Architecture and Design
Arts and Humanities
Art History
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Lecture
Provider:
Khan Academy
Provider Set:
Smarthistory
Author:
Beth Harris
Steven Zucker
Column of Trajan
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This art history video discussion examines the Column of Trajan, Carrara marble, completed 113 C.E., Rome. Dedicated to Emperor Trajan (Marcus Ulpius Nerva Traianus b. 53 , d. 117 C.E.) in honor of his victory over Dacia (now Romania) 101-02 and 105-06 C.E.

Subject:
Architecture and Design
Art History
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Lecture
Provider:
Khan Academy
Provider Set:
Smarthistory
Author:
Beth Harris
Steven Zucker
Hadrian's Villa: A Virtual Tour
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This video provides a virtual tour of Hadrian's Villa using a 3D digital model of the villa created under the direction of Dr. Bernard Frischer. The ruins of Hadrian's Villa, in the town of Tivoli, near Rome, is spread over an area of approximately 250 acres. Many of the structures were designed by the Emperor Hadrian who ruled from 117 until his death in 138 C.E. This virual rendering is based on current archeological research and has been created in consultation with art historians, archaeologists, and museum curators with expertise in this area. Please note, a few features are necessarily assumptions based on the best available evidence.

Subject:
Architecture and Design
Arts and Humanities
Art History
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Lecture
Provider:
Khan Academy
Provider Set:
Smarthistory
Author:
Beth Harris
Steven Zucker
History and Geometry of Roman Aqueducts
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Students see that geometric shapes can be found in all sorts of structures as they explore the history of the Roman Empire with a focus on how engineers 2000 years ago laid the groundwork for many structures seen today. Through a short online video, brief lecture material and their own online research directed by worksheet questions, students discover how the Romans invented a structure known today as the Roman arch that enabled them to build architecture never before seen by humankind, including the amazing aqueducts. Students calculate the slope and its total drop and angle over its entire distance for an example aqueduct. Completing this lesson prepares students for the associated activity in which teams build and test model aqueducts that meet specific constraints. This lesson serves as an introduction to many other geometry—and engineering-related lessons—including statics and trusses, scale modeling, and trigonometry.

Subject:
Mathematics
Geometry
Material Type:
Lesson
Provider:
TeachEngineering
Author:
CU Teach Engineering (a STEM licensure pathway), Engineering Plus Degree Program, University of Colorado Boulder
Lauchlin Blue
Malinda Zarske
Nathan Coyle
Let’s Build an Aqueduct!
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Students explore in detail how the Romans built aqueducts using arches—and the geometry involved in doing so. Building on what they learned in the associated lesson about how innovative Roman arches enabled the creation of magnificent structures such as aqueducts, students use trigonometry to complete worksheet problem calculations to determine semicircular arch construction details using trapezoidal-shaped and cube-shaped blocks. Then student groups use hot glue and half-inch wooden cube blocks to build model aqueducts, doing all the calculations to design and build the arches necessary to support a water-carrying channel over a three-foot span. They calculate the slope of the small-sized aqueduct based on what was typical for Roman aqueducts at the time, aiming to construct the ideal slope over a specified distance in order to achieve a water flow that is not spilling over or stagnant. They test their model aqueducts with water and then reflect on their performance.

Subject:
Mathematics
Geometry
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Provider:
TeachEngineering
Author:
CU Teach Engineering (a STEM licensure pathway), Engineering Plus Degree Program, University of Colorado Boulder
Lauchlin Blue
Malinda Zarske
Nathan Coyle
Roman Architecture
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In this course the student will study the architecture of Ancient Rome beginning with its origins in the eighth century BC and continuing through the fourth century AD with the move of the Roman capital to Constantinople. The course will familiarize you with the major building methods and styles used in Roman architecture as well as interior decoration. Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to: demonstrate an understanding of the general arc of the history of ancient Rome; identify the major historical events in ancient Roman history and the emperors who presided during these events; demonstrate an understanding of the vital role that imagery, especially architecture, played in Rome's political and cultural world; identify the origins of various styles that the Romans borrowed and explain how they were re-purposed; identify the major stylistic developments from Rome's origins to its demise; identify the styles that were popular under the rule of different emperors, and explain how those styles relate to a political ideology; discuss the different building techniques used by the Romans and explain how the development of new techniques changed the appearance of Roman architecture; demonstrate an understanding of the different provinces of the Roman Empire and the ways in which regional differences are apparent in architecture; identify specific monuments and be able to provide basic identifying information: title, date, location, architects (if known), patron; explain the importance of Roman architecture in shaping the architecture of later Western civilizations. (Art History 409)

Subject:
Architecture and Design
Material Type:
Assessment
Full Course
Homework/Assignment
Lecture
Lecture Notes
Reading
Syllabus
Provider:
The Saylor Foundation