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Algebra I - Mixture Problems
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National Board Certified teacher Marlo Warburton introduces a fresh approach to teaching the notoriously difficult "mixture" word problems for Algebra I. Using an in-class demonstration and incorporating basic physics principles of weight and distance, Ms. Warburton helps her students visualize, solve -- and even enjoy! -- these challenging problems.

Subject:
Education
Algebra
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Teaching/Learning Strategy
Provider:
Teaching Channel
Provider Set:
Teaching Channel
Date Added:
11/01/2012
Algebra Team: Teacher Collaboration
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Algebra teachers, Juliana Jones and Marlo Warburton, have common philosophies and expectations in their algebra classrooms but use their own unique teaching styles and structures to create consistent experiences for students. Collaboration is an important part of that process and allows teachers to provide common learning experiences in their classrooms despite different teaching styles and structures. This video takes a look at the warm-up, lesson, strategies for group work, classroom expectations and routines to discuss commonalities but also identify ways in which each teacher personalizes their classrooms based on their own teaching style and personality.

Subject:
Algebra
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Teaching/Learning Strategy
Provider:
Teaching Channel
Provider Set:
Teaching Channel
Author:
Marlo Warburton, Juliana Jones,
Date Added:
11/02/2012
Assessing the Learning Process
Conditions of Use:
Remix and Share
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Assessment, like instruction, needs to be geared toward various learning styles, and teachers can create rubrics for ongoing assessment that keep a formal daily record of what students are learning. Traditional styles of teaching focus almost exclusively on auditory presentation of material to students Š—” in other words, lecturing. KŠ—–12 education is moving away from that traditional model towards methods of teaching that address childrenŠ—Čs multiple intelligences and are appropriate to different types of learners, not only auditory learners. But although weŠ—Čve come a long way in how we teach students, we havenŠ—Čt always made great strides in how we assess them. Most assessment still takes the form of quizzes, tests, and written homework, which work best for students who are the strongest verbal thinkers. Portfolios play only a small role, and even they only begin to address the various learning styles. If weŠ—Čre going to teach in a way that addresses all learning styles, shouldnŠ—Čt we also assess that way?

Subject:
Algebra
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Reading
Teaching/Learning Strategy
Provider:
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill School of Education
Provider Set:
LEARN NC Articles & More
Author:
David Walbert
Gretchen Buher
Date Added:
04/26/2004
Breaking the Attention-Seeking Habit: The Power of Random Positive Teacher Attention
Conditions of Use:
Read the Fine Print
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Some students misbehave because they are trying to attract teacher attention. Surprisingly, many students who value adult attention don't really care if it is positive (praise) or negative attention (reprimands)--they just want attention!
Unfortunately, instructors with students who thrive on teacher attention can easily fall into a 'reprimand trap.' The scenario might unfold much like this: First, the student misbehaves. Then the teacher approaches the student and reprimands him or her for misbehaving. Because the student finds the negative teacher attention to be reinforcing, he or she continues to misbehave-and the teacher naturally responds by reprimanding the student more often! An escalating, predictable cycle is established, with the student repeatedly acting-out and teacher reprimanding him or her.
Teachers can break out of this cycle, though, by using 'random positive attention' with students. Essentially, the instructor starts to ignore student attention-seeking behaviors, while at the same time 'randomly' giving the student positive attention. That is, the student receives regular positive teacher attention but at times unconnected to misbehavior. So the student still gets the adult attention that he or she craves. More importantly, the link between student misbehavior and resulting negative teacher attention is broken.

Subject:
Education
Material Type:
Teaching/Learning Strategy
Provider:
Intervention Central
Author:
Jim Wright
Date Added:
02/10/2014
Build a Student Motivation Trap to Increase Academic Engagement
Conditions of Use:
Read the Fine Print
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Motivating a reluctant student to complete schoolwork is not easy. In a typical classroom, students can choose from a number of sources of potential reinforcement (Billington & DiTommaso, 2003)--and academic tasks often take a back seat to competing behaviors such as talking with peers. One way that teachers can increase the attractiveness of schoolwork is by structuring lessons or assignments around topics or activities of high interest to the student (Miller et al., 2003).In fact, with planning, the teacher can set up a 'trap' that uses motivating elements to capture a student's attention to complete academic tasks (Alber & Heward, 1996). Here is a 6-step blue-print for building an academic 'motivation trap' (adapted from Alber & Heward, 1996).

Subject:
Education
Material Type:
Teaching/Learning Strategy
Provider:
Intervention Central
Author:
Jim Wright
Date Added:
02/10/2014
Building Parent-Teacher Partnerships: Classroom Tips
Conditions of Use:
Read the Fine Print
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Good two-way communication between families and schools is necessary for students' success. Not surprisingly, research shows that the more parents and teachers share relevant information with each other about a student, the better equipped both will be to help that student achieve academically. Opportunities for two-way communication include: (1) Parent conferences; (2) Parent-teacher organizations or school community councils; (3) Weekly or monthly folders of student work sent home for parent review and comment; (4) Phone calls; and (5) E-mail or school Web site. This paper presents ideas for building parent-teacher partnerships.

Subject:
Education
Material Type:
Reading
Teaching/Learning Strategy
Provider:
American Federation of Teachers
Date Added:
02/11/2014
Building a Learning Community: Crafting Rules for the Classroom
Conditions of Use:
Read the Fine Print
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Students will learn to mind their ps and qs in this lesson on etiquette and appropriate behavior in the classroom.

Subject:
Language, Grammar and Vocabulary
Reading Foundation Skills
Reading Informational Text
Reading Literature
Speaking and Listening
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Lesson Plan
Provider:
ReadWriteThink
Provider Set:
ReadWriteThink
Date Added:
09/28/2013
Calming the Agitated Student
Conditions of Use:
Read the Fine Print
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Students can sometimes have emotional outbursts in school settings. This fact will not surprise many teachers, who have had repeated experience in responding to serious classroom episodes of student agitation. Such outbursts can be attributed in part to the relatively high incidence of mental health issues among children and youth. It is estimated, for example, that at least one in five students in American schools will experience a mental health disorder by adolescence (U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, 1999). But even students not identified as having behavioral or emotional disorders may occasionally have episodes of agitation triggered by situational factors such as peer bullying, frustration over poor academic performance, stressful family relationships, or perceived mistreatment by educators.

Subject:
Education
Material Type:
Teaching/Learning Strategy
Provider:
Intervention Central
Author:
Jim Wright
Date Added:
02/10/2014
Creating Class Rules: A Beginning to Creating Community
Conditions of Use:
Read the Fine Print
Rating

Students work together to create classroom rules by brainstorming why they are at school and what they need while they are there.

Subject:
Language, Grammar and Vocabulary
Reading Foundation Skills
Reading Informational Text
Reading Literature
Speaking and Listening
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Lesson Plan
Provider:
ReadWriteThink
Provider Set:
ReadWriteThink
Date Added:
09/30/2013
Culture of Growth: Growth in Students
Conditions of Use:
Read the Fine Print
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This collection illustrates practices and ideas to implement that foster a growth mindset in students. Though these practices and ideas can be implemented by individual teachers, there is power in consistency across a school community. You are encouraged to connect with your colleagues and leadership teams about your reflections and ideas about next steps for your schools.

Subject:
Education
Material Type:
Teaching/Learning Strategy
Provider:
EL Education
Date Added:
10/15/2018
Dodging the Power-Struggle Trap: Ideas for Teachers
Conditions of Use:
Read the Fine Print
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he teacher's most important objective when faced with a defiant or non-compliant student is to remain outwardly calm. Educators who react to defiant behavior by becoming visibly angry, raising their voices, or attempting to intimidate the student may actually succeed only in making the student's oppositional behavior worse! While the strategies listed here may calm an oppositional student, their main purpose is to help the teacher to keep his or her cool. Remember: any conflict requires at least two people. A power struggle can be avoided if the instructor does not choose to take part in that struggle.

Subject:
Education
Material Type:
Teaching/Learning Strategy
Provider:
Intervention Central
Author:
Jim Wright
Date Added:
02/10/2014
Effective Teacher Commands
Conditions of Use:
Read the Fine Print
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As classroom managers, teachers regularly use commands to direct students to start and stop activities. Instructors find commands to be a crucial tool for classroom management, serving as instructional signals that help students to conform to the teacher's expectations for appropriate behaviors.

Subject:
Education
Material Type:
Teaching/Learning Strategy
Provider:
Intervention Central
Author:
Jim Wright
Date Added:
02/10/2014
Encouraging Student Academic Motivation
Conditions of Use:
Read the Fine Print
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One of the greatest frustrations mentioned by many teachers is that their students are often not motivated to learn. Teachers quickly come to recognize the warning signs of poor motivation in their classroom: students put little effort into homework and classwork assignments, slump in their seats and fail to participate in class discussion, or even become confrontational toward the teacher when asked about an overdue assignment. One common method for building motivation is to tie student academic performance and classroom participation to specific rewards or privileges. Critics of reward systems note, however, that they can be expensive and cumbersome to administer and may lead the student to engage in academics only when there is an outside 'payoff.' While there is no magic formula for motivating students, the creative teacher can sometimes encourage student investment in learning in ways that do not require use of formal reward systems.

Subject:
Education
Material Type:
Teaching/Learning Strategy
Provider:
Intervention Central
Author:
Jim Wright
Date Added:
02/10/2014
The First Year
Conditions of Use:
Remix and Share
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Essays on the author's experiences in her first year of teaching: the mistakes she made, what she learned from them, and how she used them to become a better teacher -- and how other first-year teachers can, too.

Subject:
Education
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Reading
Teaching/Learning Strategy
Provider:
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill School of Education
Provider Set:
LEARN NC Articles & More
Author:
Kristi Johnson Smith
Date Added:
06/06/2006
Getting to Know You
Conditions of Use:
Read the Fine Print
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These activities will help you get the year off to a good start by engaging you and your students in getting to know each other, practicing listening skills, and discussing the values that will shape your classroom community. There are separate sets of activities for grades Pre-K to 2, grades 3 to 5, and grades 6 to 12. They are adapted from exercises in our Resolving Conflict Creatively Program and our 4Rs Program (Reading, Writing, Respect & Resolution).

Subject:
Social Science
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Lesson Plan
Teaching/Learning Strategy
Provider:
Morningside Center for Teaching Social Responsibility
Provider Set:
Teachable Moment
Author:
Tom Roderick
Date Added:
07/01/2010
Good Behavior Game
Conditions of Use:
Read the Fine Print
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The Good Behavior Game is an approach to the management of classrooms behaviors that rewards children for displaying appropriate on-task behaviors during instructional times. The class is divided into two teams and a point is given to a team for any inappropriate behavior displayed by one of its members. The team with the fewest number of points at the Game's conclusion each day wins a group reward. If both teams keep their points below a preset level, then both teams share in the reward. The program was first tested in 1969; several research articles have confirmed that the Game is an effective means of increasing the rate of on-task behaviors while reducing disruptions in the classroom (Barrish, Saunders, & Wolf, 1969; Harris & Sherman, 1973; Medland & Stachnik, 1972).
The process of introducing the Good Behavior Game into a classroom is a relatively simple procedure. There are five steps involved in putting the Game into practice.

Subject:
Education
Material Type:
Teaching/Learning Strategy
Provider:
Intervention Central
Author:
Jim Wright
Date Added:
02/10/2014