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Continental Climate and Oceanic Climate
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This activity proposes different small experiments and discussions to show that in the summer it is cooler by the sea than on the land and that water cools off more slowly than soil.

Subject:
Physical Science
Oceanography
Physical Geography
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Provider:
International Astronomical Union
Provider Set:
astroEDU
Author:
Leiden Observatory
Date Added:
01/01/2016
How To Travel on Earth Without Getting Lost
Conditions of Use:
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With this activity, students use a globe to learn how a position on Earth can be described. They investigate how latitude can be found using the stars. Students learn what latitude and longitude are and how to use them to indicate a position on Earth. They investigate how in some locations on Earth, the direction of the midday sun can change over the year.

Subject:
Physical Geography
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
International Astronomical Union
Provider Set:
astroEDU
Author:
Leiden Observatory
Date Added:
01/01/2016
Investigating the Atmosphere – Air Takes Up Space
Conditions of Use:
No Strings Attached
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This is a hands-on activity to show that air takes up space even though you cannot see it.The goal is to understand that gas occupies space and relate it to real situations that prove it.

Subject:
Physics
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Provider:
International Astronomical Union
Provider Set:
astroEDU
Author:
Leiden Observatory
Date Added:
01/01/2016
Seasons Around the World
Conditions of Use:
No Strings Attached
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Description:

Build a model of the Earth, with its spin-axis, and a lamp as the Sun to demonstrate the concept of seasons.

Goals

--Understanding why we have seasons and the cause of seasonal variation in temperature.
--Learning about how the Earth rotates on a tilted axis compared to its orbit around the Sun.

Learning Objectives

--Students learn about seasons by building a model of the Earth and the Sun, and investigating how sunlight hits the Northern and Southern Hemispheres during different seasons.
--Students explain that the same amount of light hitting the ground heats up a small area more than a large area
--Students show that the angle at which the sunlight hits the Earth influences how much the sunlight heats up the Earth.
Students demonstrate that the angle at which the sunlight hits the Earth is related to the tilt of the Earth’s rotational axis compared to the Earth’s orbit around the Sun.

Subject:
Physical Science
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Provider:
International Astronomical Union
Provider Set:
astroEDU
Author:
Leiden Observatory
Date Added:
07/24/2017