2020 Summer Equity & Open Ed

PSY 104 Workplace Psychology

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PSY 104 Workplace Psychology Focuses on a number of important factors for effective performance in the workplace. Includes interpersonal skill development and communication, understanding individual differences, developing conflict resolution skills, group behavior, problem solving and decision making, becoming an effective leader; motivation, goal planning, diversity, stress management, improving career management skills, enhancing ethical behavior, and managing various work conditions. Covers important workplace laws and regulations in the United States. F, W, Sp, Su. The first two weeks of this course covers the history of I-O psychology as well as organizational culture. This plan is designed to provide an avenue for teaching these topics in a way that utilizes universal designed and culturally responsive. This is done by providing multiple means for learning about the topics in order to appeal to many different students. In particular, the topic is introduced using three different texts as one may speak to each student better than another. The first assignment is designed in such a way that it allows the student to choose something that is relevant and meaningful to them. Workplace diversity is introduced early on to emphasize the importance of this topic.

Material Type: Module, Unit of Study

Author: Reina Daugherty

Ideology and Racism Syllabus, Readings, and Reading Responses

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I've produced a mini syllabus that can be used for Writing 121/122 course with a racism and ideology emphasis for the term's research project/paper. The online readings can be accessed through the reading list links on the syllabus; the additional readings and reading responses can be accessed on Google drive. WR 121 - Academic Composition 4 Credit(s) This course focuses on rhetorical reading, thinking, and writing as means of inquiry. Students will gain fluency with key rhetorical concepts and utilize these in a flexible and collaborative writing process, reflecting on their writing process with the goal of developing metacognitive awareness. They will employ conventions, including formal citations, appropriate for a given writing task, attending to the constraints of audience, purpose, genre, and discourse community. Students will compose in two or more genres. They will produce 3000-3500 words of revised, final draft copy or an appropriate multimodal analog for this amount of text. Students will produce at least one essay that integrates research and demonstrates an understanding of the role of an assertive thesis in an academic essay of at least 1000 words. Prerequisite: With a grade of C- or better or pass in WR 115 or placement test. Learning Outcomes Upon successful completion of this course, the student should be able to: Develop and practice rhetorical awareness. Recognize key rhetorical concepts; begin to apply these concepts through analysis of texts. Critical Thinking, Reading, and Writing. Develop and demonstrate critical reading strategies of college-level texts; practice critical reading as a component of the writing process. Practice the evaluation of sources provided; recognize the conversational nature of academic conversations and of research. Identify and practice stages of the writing process. Recognize that composing processes and tools are a means to discover and reconsider ideas. Experience collaborative aspects of writing processes through giving and receiving feedback. Knowledge of Conventions. Recognize and practice the conventions of Standard Edited English. Understand the effects of genre on text structure, paragraphing, sentence structure, and word choice. Recognize that composing practices enact and impact thinking. Investigate how to transfer and apply writing knowledge to new contexts.

Material Type: Reading, Syllabus

Author: Steve Owen

Culture and Identity in STEM Portfolio

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These materials are generalizable to any STEM class. They were developed for Introductory Astronomy at Lane Community College. These assignments were developed with the Equity and Open Education Faculty Cohort, hosted by Open Oregon Educational Resources. The overarching goal is to broaden participation in STEM and increase student success by using creative portfolio assignments which connect course content with various dimensions of students’ lives. ASTR 121 - Astronomy of the Solar System 4 Credit(s) ASTR 121, 122 and 123, may be taken out of sequence. This sequence provides an in-depth and comprehensive introduction to the science of astronomy. These courses are designed to serve non-science majors, but also offer a good introduction for prospective science majors interested in Astrophysics or Space Science. These courses have a significant lab component. ASTR 121 focuses on naked-eye astronomy and the science of astronomy focused primarily on our solar system and comparative planetology, the Earth and its Moon, detailed consideration of the individual planets, solar system debris including comets and asteroids, and modeling the origin of our solar system. Lab included. Prerequisite: MTH 052 or MTH 060 or MTH 065 or MTH 070 or MTH 095 or MTH 111 or placement test. Learning Outcomes Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to: 1. Think and communicate based on familiarity with a wide variety of physical phenomena involving the solar system and the means by which it is described and explained. 2. Think and communicate based on familiarity, in part through direct practice, with observational tools, chains of reasoning and exploration and knowledge of scientific methods that are part of the practice of this area of astronomy. 3. Correctly use scientific reasoning regarding the formation of the solar system, and think and communicate with significant basic conceptual understanding of systems involved in present-day terrestrial and Jovian planets. 4. Converse and comprehend making use of elementary descriptions and laws of mechanical motion and gravity applied to the motion of objects in our solar system. 5. Engage this area of astronomy with an active scientific literacy, which includes use of public resources widely available as part of large scale astronomy investigation. 6. Think and communicate based on an elementary understanding of exploration of the solar system, drawing conclusions from experimental data about possible explanations of physical mechanisms of the solar system and its constituent parts. 7. Formulate questions to move their thinking forward concerning the subject matter of the class. 8. Think and communicate with a familiarity with elementary applications of basic physics underlying the formation and structure of the solar system, as well as interplay of planetary systems such as plate tectonics, volcanic activity and atmospheric evolution. 8. Reflect and communicate on possible uses and impacts of this physics knowledge regarding the solar system. 9. Converse and write about the nature of science with increased sophistication and see physics/astronomy as a science, rather than a body of knowledge. 10. Appreciate that the insights provided by Classical Mechanics and Newtonian Gravity are valuable and useful even though physics has developed beyond Newtonian Gravity and Classical Mechanics and beyond mechanical theories - of which Classical Mechanics is a premier example. 11. Appreciate current efforts to create new insights in this area of astronomy and have a sense of currently open questions within the astrophysics community.

Material Type: Homework/Assignment

Author: Andrea Goering

Culture and Communication Slide Presentation

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COMM 111 Public Speaking This course exposes students to theory and practice in the creation, adaptation and delivery of original speeches before an audience. It also provides the opportunity to understand the nature of public speaking and discourse in both ancient and modern society. Outcomes Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to: Synthesize, organize information for varied audiences. Interact with confidence while adapting messages to audience needs. Listen critically.

Material Type: Diagram/Illustration, Module

Author: John Drischell

Diversity Assignment

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Assignment to find a scientist, researcher, inventor, or the like that may be overlooked by the dominant culture and to identify one aspect of your personal diversity and consider its overlap within someone in STEM. CHE 221 A general chemistry sequence for students majoring in most sciences, pharmacy, and chemical engineering. This is the first of a three-term sequence for students in science, engineering and the professional health programs. Outcomes Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to: Differentiate the historical developments leading to the development of the atomic theory and the Periodic Table. Solve scientific problems with quantitative methods using dimensional analysis and/or algebra regarding unit conversions, stoichiometry, gas laws, and thermochemistry. Apply chemical principles associated with chemical and physical changes and properties of matter, nomenclature, chemical reactions, thermochemistry, the kinetic theory of a gas, and quantum theory. Work safely in a laboratory environment while observing and accurately recording measurements related to chemical phenomena.

Material Type: Homework/Assignment

Author: Beth Manhat

Shared Annotated Bibliography

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This is a shared document for the students in WR 122 - Critical Thinking & Argument Analysis: a college writing course focused on the various approaches to discerning concepts of truth, academic authority, and justice. This will become a living, growing archive of annotated sources on this very important topic for future classes to use, add to, and reference. The general public will also be able to access this research document. The document is a working annotated bibliography on the diverse theme of the effects of social media on critical thinking skills and the substantive analysis of public debate. It is compiled of scholarly, popular, and online magazine articles, research reports, audiovisual content, and news articles. All of the items have been collected/annotated by MHCC writing students and the professor, Andrew Gurevich.

Material Type: Homework/Assignment

Author: Andrew Gurevich

Equity in Education

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This Module was created for ED 100- Intro to Education. This is a course taken by over 200 students a year, most of whom are considering a career in education. It is a really useful and practical course, good for anyone who has kids/family members in schools, votes in elections on school-related issues or is considering a job/career in the field. ED 100 Introduction to Education for Paraeducators Explores the roles of a variety of personnel in schools. Includes personal responses to school situations, students, other personnel and the roles of schools in American Society. Examines ethical, legal, and administrative implications for educators. Recommended as an initial course for those contemplating a career in education. Course is designed to ease the transition of students to college-level study.

Material Type: Module

Author: Tanya Mead

The Age of Accountability in US Education

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Course: ED 100- INTRO TO EDUCATION (WEEK 6) Following a 4 part film series “The Story of American Public Education” https://films.com/id/1538/School_The_Story_of_American_Public_Education.htm, students will have been considering issues of equity and access in the US school system up through the 1990s when the the age of accountability is introduced. This lays the groundwork for the next chapter: NCLB, ESSA and the Common Core. ED 100 Introduction to Education for Paraeducators Explores the roles of a variety of personnel in schools. Includes personal responses to school situations, students, other personnel and the roles of schools in American Society. Examines ethical, legal, and administrative implications for educators. Recommended as an initial course for those contemplating a career in education. Course is designed to ease the transition of students to college-level study. Audit available.

Material Type: Module

Author: Tanya Mead

Equity and Open Education_Ariel Ladum

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These materials aim to start introducing OER to the course as well as to develop the culturally responsive dimension of the course. This is the first time using the OER textbook (Psychology 2e), so the discussion board activities are designed to pilot the textbook, get feedback from the students, and generate a ‘living anthology’ of supplementary/complementary materials that correspond to students’ experiences and interests. The activities described below are used during the first two weeks of the course. Each activity includes a Main Discussion Post and then ‘Comments’ on a classmate’s post. The grading rubrics used for assessment are included in Appendix D. The video lectures and chapter notes need further work in terms of accessibility and using copyrighted materials. The changes that have been made will serve students more equitably by decreasing financial burden and better corresponding to/representing students’ perspectives and experiences. PSY201 Introduction to Psychology Part 1 Introduces the following major topics in psychology: history, research methods, biopsychology, sensation and perception, learning, memory, human development, consciousness, and associated topics in cognition. Provides an overview of current trends, and emphasizes the sociocultural approach to understand cognition, emotions, and behavior. This is the first course of a two-course sequence.

Material Type: Full Course

Author: Ariel Ladum

Assignment Sequence

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WR 121 Critical Thinking and Writing Assignment Sequence Course Overview This is a first year college composition course, focusing on critical thinking and writing. I designed the content and writing prompts as a progression of examining knowledge and each assignment seeks to expand ways of thinking and by extension, ways of writing. WR 121 College Composition Offers broad preparation for both academic writing and professional communication. Includes composing for a variety of rhetorical situations, writing for both oneself, and for external audiences. Provides self-guided learning opportunities alongside more structured opportunities for practice with support as needed.

Material Type: Homework/Assignment, Reading

Author: Sally Badawi

Table of Contents and Calendar

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These materials were designed as part of the Equity and Open Education Faculty Cohort in the Summer of 2020. The materials are for IRW 90 -- Foundations of College Reading and Composition This document contains three parts: 1. My Implementation Goals 2. Open Access Textbooks used in the course The Word on College Reading and Writing 1,2,3 Write! 3. IRW 90 Course Calendar (Weeks 1-2) incorporating the open access textbooks with links to related activities and assignments. IRW 90 Foundations of College Reading and Composition Course Description Covers reading and writing processes, topic development, and revision for clarity. Focuses on developing flexible strategies for reading and writing, and producing clear and coherent paragraphs and essays. Emphasizes strategies for comprehension and metacognition, critical reading and thinking skills, intellectual curiosity, vocabulary development, and writing conventions. Intended Outcomes for the course Upon completion of the course students should be able to: Read to understand main ideas, supporting details, and a writer’s purpose in a variety of texts. Use composing and reading strategies for comprehension. Use reading strategies to write coherent texts that develop ideas in support of a central idea. Use writing conventions (content, form, format) to communicate the writer’s ideas. Use strategies to enhance and diversify knowledge of vocabulary. Follow a process to access information in textbooks and other reference texts. Use flexible strategies for pre-reading, reading, reviewing, rereading, correcting comprehension, drafting, revising, and editing.

Material Type: Unit of Study

Author: Della Abrahams

Course Redesign Plan

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CG 111A Study Skills for College Learning Exploring College, College Resources, Learning Styles Provides information, techniques, strategies and skills helpful in becoming more efficient in note taking, textbook reading, and taking exams. Includes identification of preferred learning style and development of skills in scheduling study time, library research, memory strategies and critical thinking. Goal 1: Modify the adopted OER with additional learning materials to make it more customized for my specific course and learning objectives. Goal 2: Transform the weekly “disposable assignment” to be more meaningful for student learning. Goal 3: Re-design the final class project to be more inclusive of student experiences/voices/opinions, and eventually make this a “legacy project” to be shared with future class sections.

Material Type: Teaching/Learning Strategy

Author: Beau Gilbert

Environmental Science Fall 2020 OER Folder

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This folder currently includes Environmental Science: People to Know Lab, Environmental Science: Ethnobotany Lab, and Example: Pacific Northwest Ethnobotany: Native Plants & Their Uses Slides for ESR 171 Fall 2020. ESR 171 Environmental Science: Biological Perspectives Covers environmental topics that are primarily biological in nature, including ecosystem functions, biodiversity, human population issues, agricultural practices, and environmental ethics. Laboratory exercises illustrate these topics and may include fieldwork.

Material Type: Activity/Lab

Author: Taryn Oakley

Unit Redesign Template and Week 9 and 10 Lesson Plan

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Here’s an optional template you can use to organize and share your materials. Use it directly, use it as a guide to create your own, or submit something different. This is your own copy that you can edit directly. Remember to set your “share” permissions to “anyone with the link can view.” Remember to set public permissions for any materials that you link out to. Copy and paste the CC-BY licensing footer onto documents that you have created. Be sure to delete all instructional text. Your finished product should be ready to share with other instructors who did not participate in the EOE cohort. The goal is to redesign your “unit” and provide another instructor with the context and materials they would need to implement it. Lesson plan and content materials for weeks 9 and 10 for CIS 288M - MS Windows Server Admin II CIS 288M - MS Windows Server Admin II This course is the third in a series of three courses centered around managing Microsoft servers in an Active Directory domain environment. Instruction includes, but is not limited to: Active Directory; group policy objects; Active Directory Certificate Services; Active Directory Federation Services; Web Application Proxy; and Active Directory Rights Management Services. This course will help students prepare for a current Microsoft Certified Professional (MCP) Exam.

Material Type: Lesson Plan, Teaching/Learning Strategy

Author: John Blackwood

Positive Psychology OER Course

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Includes sample syllabus, Edited & Remixed: Tao of Positive Psychology, Possible Course Materials & Resources, and Proposed Term Schedule. PSY 439 Positive Psychology Examines psychological factors and principles that help explain positive outcomes, well-being and personal growth in humans. Areas of focus will include positive emotional experiences and appraisals such a happiness, life satisfaction, well-being, positive personal characteristics, interests and values, and positive institutions as they promote growth and fulfilling experiences. There will be a significant applied component of the class in which students will explore their own reactions and personal qualities.

Material Type: Full Course

Author: Jessica Murfin

Implementation Goals and Calendar

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Which class you are working on I am working on EC201 Principles of Microeconomics. Which part/how much of your curriculum you’re planning to tackle I have incorporated OER materials from OpenStax and other open video resources for each module of economic concepts a couple years already. For this project, I’m revising a couple assignments for my online learning class. My goal is to apply what I learned from open pedagogy and universal design. The two topics that I want to try out are the demand and supply model and/or marginal analysis. What techniques, approaches or resources you’re planning to try. I want students to relate the concept to their daily life experience and think of an example of demand and supply. The learning objective is for them to understand the basic idea of resource allocation in a free market. Students will apply the graphical model to illustrate and explain the price mechanism and moving of productions and consumptions. Open pedagogy: Students will create their own work and will have peer review. Similar examples will be grouped together and will be used in the next term for tutorial and sample work collection. Universal design: I’ll provide free resources and options on how to build a demand and supply model; for example, a variety of apps they could use, step by step tutorial on how to plot demand and supply. Students choose the one that fits their skills to start their work. Culturally Responsive Teaching: the goal of the assignment is a representation of each student’s experience. It also gives them the opportunity to express what they see in the market economy through the different media. How do you hope that this will serve students more equitably than your previous materials/plan To increase access to core instructional materials and save them costs. To improve students’ learning outcomes individually and collaboratively. EC201 Principles of Microeconomics. Introduces the principles of microeconomics. Enhances the ability to recognize and analyze economic problems in the United States. Covers the American microeconomic system, which includes a familiarization with the basis of the price system and resource allocation; the operation of the firm; market concentration; regulation and antitrust policies.

Material Type: Module, Teaching/Learning Strategy

Author: Choikam Miranda Yip

Module 1 - Diverse Environments for Learners

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Context for instructors Ed 446D is a required course for teacher candidates who are completing the teacher preparation program at my institution Ed 446 D introduces the multicultural perspective and prepares teachers with the knowledge, skills, and abilities to work with a diverse group of learners. This is a required course for education majors. Teacher candidates will be evaluated on their engagement with assignments that give them the opportunity to demonstrate the aptitudes of culturally responsive educators. A certain level of pedagogical clarity will develop as teacher candidates learn how to take up critical education in order highlight opportunities for typically marginalized student populations. The content of this course requires teacher candidates to explore their positionality in relation to others’, address personal biases that may affect their teaching, and begin building cultural competencies. Teacher candidates will be expected to participate in classroom discourse that is reflective of and respectful toward diverse perspectives.

Material Type: Module, Teaching/Learning Strategy

Author: Yuliana Kenfield

Race by the Numbers

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Context for Instructors MTH 110 This unit is part of a class called Applied College Mathematics, a course developed specifically to serve students who need more algebra, statistics, and quantitative reasoning skills than a traditional “liberal arts” math class would offer them, but who do not need to take precalculus or calculus classes. Typical majors of students in this course include, but are not limited to: Business Criminal Justice Community Health Exercise Science Interdisciplinary Studies Psychology Two of the course learning outcomes for Applied College Mathematics are: Draw reasonable and appropriately qualified conclusions from quantitative analysis of real-world applications. Understand the use of percent, proportions and rates in solving real-world problems.

Material Type: Unit of Study

Author: Leanne Merrill

Criminal Justice OER Drive Folder

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This drive folder includes an Accessible Syllabus, Increased Level of Cultural Responsiveness document, and Legacy Assignment. CRJ 331D Police & Community: Policy Perspective Course Description: This course provides a broad review of contemporary American crime control policies and their relationship to community needs and citizen expectations. Emphasis on the influences that politics (i.e. minority groups, advocacy groups, etc.), culture, economics and bureaucracy have on policy development. Learning Objectives: Students who successfully complete this course will be able to: Describe the police history, organizational and operational structures, strategies and tactics, ethics and policies, and behavior through the scope of police-community relations. Adequately explain the complex nature of police-community relations and how it has changed throughout the years. Understand the important theoretical foundations, empirical research findings, and contemporary practice, and to identify “best policies and practices” in policing. Examine what is necessary for improving police-community relations in our society today.

Material Type: Homework/Assignment, Syllabus, Teaching/Learning Strategy

Author: Mari Sakiyama