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  • Protest
Activism in the US
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The United States has a long history of activists seeking social, political, economic, and other changes to America—along with a history of other activists trying to prevent such changes. American activism covered a wide range of causes and utilized many different forms of activism. American sociopolitical activism became especially prominent during the period of societal upheaval which began during the 1950s. The African American civil rights movement led the way, soon followed by a substantial anti-war movement opposing American involvement in the Vietnam War, and later by vigorous activism involving women’s issues, gay rights, and other causes. The United States remains a land of nearly constant change, and activists play a significant role in the ongoing evolution of American democracy. It seems likely that Americans will remain enthusiastic activists in the future. This exhibition is part of the Digital Library of Georgia.

Subject:
U.S. History
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Primary Source
Unit of Study
Provider:
Digital Library of Georgia
Digital Public Library of America
Provider Set:
DPLA Exhibitions
Date Added:
04/01/2013
African American Protest Poetry, Freedom's Story, TeacherServe®, National Humanities Center
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Given the secondary position of persons of African descent throughout their history in America, it could reasonably be argued that all efforts of creative writers from that group are forms of protest. However, for purposes of this discussion, Defining African American protest poetrysome parameters might be drawn. First—a definition. Protest, as used herein, refers to the practice within African American literature of bringing redress to the secondary status of black people, of attempting to achieve the acceptance of black people into the larger American body politic, of encouraging practitioners of democracy truly to live up to what democratic ideals on American soil mean. Protest literature consists of a variety of approaches, from the earliest literary efforts to contemporary times. These include articulating the plight of enslaved persons, challenging the larger white community to change its attitude toward those persons, and providing specific reference points for the nature of the complaints presented. In other words, the intention of protest literature was—and remains—to show inequalities among races and socio-economic groups in America and to encourage a transformation in the society that engenders such inequalities. For African Americans, Some of the questions motivating African American protest poetrythat inequality began with slavery. How, in a country that professed belief in an ideal democracy, could one group of persons enslave another? What forms of moral persuasion could be used to get them to see the error of their ways? In addition, how, in a country that professed belief in Christianity, could one group enslave persons whom Christian doctrine taught were their brothers and sisters? And the list of “hows” goes on. How could white Americans justify Jim Crow? Inequalities in education, housing, jobs, accommodation, transportation, and a host of other things? In response to these “hows,” another “how” emerged. How could writers use their imaginations and pens to bring about change in the society? Protest literature, therefore, focused on such issues and worked to rectify them. Poetry is but one of the media through which writers address such issues, as there are forms of protest fiction, drama, essays, and anything else that African Americans wrote—and write.

Subject:
Reading Literature
Material Type:
Lesson
Reading
Author:
National Humanities Center
Trudier Harris
Date Added:
05/03/2019
The American Indian Movement, 1968-1978
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
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This collection uses primary sources to explore the American Indian Movement between 1968 and 1978. Digital Public Library of America Primary Source Sets are designed to help students develop their critical thinking skills and draw diverse material from libraries, archives, and museums across the United States. Each set includes an overview, ten to fifteen primary sources, links to related resources, and a teaching guide. These sets were created and reviewed by the teachers on the DPLA's Education Advisory Committee.

Subject:
U.S. History
Ethnic Studies
Material Type:
Primary Source
Provider:
Digital Public Library of America
Provider Set:
Primary Source Sets
Author:
Franky Abbott
Date Added:
04/11/2016
Book 3, Transformation. Chapter 6, Lesson 1: Artists Protest McCarthyism
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This lesson focuses on McCarthyism, the Red Scare, and how artists were targeted by HUAC during the Cold War. Students will view several government-produced "educational" films and television interviews from the 1950s, and will participate in a group reading of HUAC's interrogations of Seeger and Hays, discussing how activist artists championed the civil liberties of American citizens.

Subject:
Performing Arts
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
TeachRock
Date Added:
09/03/2019
The Boston Tea Party
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
Rating

This collection uses primary sources to explore the Boston Tea Party. Digital Public Library of America Primary Source Sets are designed to help students develop their critical thinking skills and draw diverse material from libraries, archives, and museums across the United States. Each set includes an overview, ten to fifteen primary sources, links to related resources, and a teaching guide. These sets were created and reviewed by the teachers on the DPLA's Education Advisory Committee.

Subject:
U.S. History
Material Type:
Primary Source
Provider:
Digital Public Library of America
Provider Set:
Primary Source Sets
Author:
Samantha Gibson
Date Added:
04/11/2016
Fannie Lou Hamer and the Civil Rights Movement in Rural Mississippi
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This collection uses primary sources to explore Fannie Lou Hamer and the civil rights movement in rural Mississippi. Digital Public Library of America Primary Source Sets are designed to help students develop their critical thinking skills and draw diverse material from libraries, archives, and museums across the United States. Each set includes an overview, ten to fifteen primary sources, links to related resources, and a teaching guide. These sets were created and reviewed by the teachers on the DPLA's Education Advisory Committee.

Subject:
U.S. History
Women's Studies
Material Type:
Primary Source
Provider:
Digital Public Library of America
Provider Set:
Primary Source Sets
Author:
Jamie Lathan
Date Added:
04/11/2016
The Fish Wars: What Kinds of Actions Can Lead to Justice
Read the Fine Print
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This online lesson provides perspectives from Native American community members and their supporters, images, news footage, an interactive timeline, and other sources about an important campaign to secure the treaty rights and sovereignty of Native Nations of the Pacific Northwest. Scroll to begin an exploration of the actions Native Nations took to address injustices.

Subject:
History
Physical Geography
Social Science
Cultural Geography
Material Type:
Lesson
Module
Provider:
Smithsonian Institution
Author:
Native Knowledge 360
Date Added:
08/08/2018
Historical Connections/Patterns of Civil Rights Movements
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While learning about historical connections/patterns of civil rights movements in History class, students in English Language Arts will be completing literature circles featuring various genres of literature. Students will start 5-6 consecutive classes featuring excerpts and reviews of new novels and short stories. Students will then personalize learning, exercising voice and choice when selecting a novel to finish reading and specialize in. Using the book of their choice, students will move into their final project which will bring the historical event together with modern issues. Students will have a few days to build their projects.
Written by: Sean Astle, Chelsea Crowley, Pam Kelly and Sr. Lauren Zak

Subject:
English Language Arts
History
Psychology
Material Type:
Unit of Study
Author:
Sr. Lauren Zak
Date Added:
08/13/2018
The Homestead Strike
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
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This collection uses primary sources to explore the Homestead Strike. Digital Public Library of America Primary Source Sets are designed to help students develop their critical thinking skills and draw diverse material from libraries, archives, and museums across the United States. Each set includes an overview, ten to fifteen primary sources, links to related resources, and a teaching guide. These sets were created and reviewed by the teachers on the DPLA's Education Advisory Committee.

Subject:
U.S. History
Material Type:
Primary Source
Provider:
Digital Public Library of America
Provider Set:
Primary Source Sets
Author:
Franky Abbott
Date Added:
04/11/2016
Ida B. Wells and Anti-Lynching Activism
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This collection uses primary sources to explore Ida B. Wells and anti-lynching activism. Digital Public Library of America Primary Source Sets are designed to help students develop their critical thinking skills and draw diverse material from libraries, archives, and museums across the United States. Each set includes an overview, ten to fifteen primary sources, links to related resources, and a teaching guide. These sets were created and reviewed by the teachers on the DPLA's Education Advisory Committee.

Subject:
U.S. History
Ethnic Studies
Women's Studies
Material Type:
Primary Source
Provider:
Digital Public Library of America
Provider Set:
Primary Source Sets
Author:
Samantha Gibson
Date Added:
04/11/2016
Lenses of Vietnam: Protest in a Democracy [Inquiry Design Model (IDM) Unit Plan]
Only Sharing Permitted
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This inquiry takes students through an analysis and evaluation of the Compelling Question “Is protest important in a democracy?” using the Vietnam War as a lens to approach the topic. To accomplish this, students will become more media literate through evaluating sources, biases, perspectives, and the goals of creating media. Throughout the inquiry, students will engage in activities designed to promote and develop media literacy while analzying the Compelling Question and learning about the historical protests of the Vietnam Era.This inquiry is expected to take two weeks (10 periods) to complete: one 45-minute class period to stage the question, introduce the inquiry, and to review media literacy; two 45-minute class periods for each of the three supporting questions; and then three 45-minute class periods for students to write and research their argumentative thesis. If students are as of yet less familiar with media literacy, the instructor should add at least another class period, or more, introducing them more fully to this.The full unit, along with all materials and resources, is available as a PDF attachment.

Subject:
History
U.S. History
World History
Social Science
Anthropology
Cultural Geography
Political Science
Sociology
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Assessment
Diagram/Illustration
Homework/Assignment
Lesson
Lesson Plan
Module
Primary Source
Reading
Unit of Study
Author:
Adam MacDonald
Date Added:
06/23/2020
The Making of African American Identiy Volume 3, 1917-1968: Primary Sources
Restricted Use
Copyright Restricted
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The National Humanities center presents reading guides with primary source materials for the study of The Making of African American Identity, Volume 3: 1917-1968. Primary source materials include essays, articles, plays, poems, paintings, fiction, letters, songs, cartoons, interviews, memoirs, video clips, and more. Sources are divided into the topics: Segregation, Migrations, Protest, Community, and ŇOvercome?Ó

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
U.S. History
Ethnic Studies
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Reading
Provider:
National Humanities Center
Provider Set:
America In Class
Date Added:
01/07/2013
The Power of Song:  The Evolution of Protest Songs Throughout History
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CC BY-NC
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In this lesson, you will examine how popular music reflects the diverse attitudes of the American people at different times throughout history.  Through hands-on activities, you will learn how music can empower people to fight for a common cause. You will discover how protest songs evolved throughout history. For the culminating activity, you will create an annotated playlist of your top ten protest songs of all time.StandardsCC.8.5.9-10.D: Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including vocabulary describing political, social, or economic aspects of history/social science.

Subject:
Reading Informational Text
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Author:
Tracy Rains
Date Added:
01/03/2018
Road to Revolution: 1763-1776
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
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This collection uses primary sources to explore the events that led up to the American Revolutionary War. Digital Public Library of America Primary Source Sets are designed to help students develop their critical thinking skills and draw diverse material from libraries, archives, and museums across the United States. Each set includes an overview, ten to fifteen primary sources, links to related resources, and a teaching guide. These sets were created and reviewed by the teachers on the DPLA's Education Advisory Committee.

Subject:
U.S. History
Material Type:
Primary Source
Provider:
Digital Public Library of America
Provider Set:
Primary Source Sets
Author:
James Walsh
Date Added:
10/20/2015
Scraps of Time 1960: Abby Takes a Stand
Only Sharing Permitted
CC BY-NC-ND
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In this lesson, students read about incidences of racial discrimination and how those incidences were met with methods of protests. They engage in an activity that matches programs for low-income people with the type of economic inequity the program addresses and observe an activity simulating tax payments and transfers.

Subject:
English Language Arts
Economics
Material Type:
Lesson
Lesson Plan
Reading
Provider:
Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis
Provider Set:
Economic Lowdown Lessons
Author:
Barbara Flowers
Date Added:
09/11/2019
Soundtracks: Songs That Defined History, Lesson 1. "Alright" and the History of Black Protest Songs
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CC BY-NC-SA
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Students will compare Kendrick Lamar's "Alright" with black protest songs of the past in order to identify common themes and ideas tat artists have used to illustrate black experience in the United States.

Subject:
Performing Arts
Ethnic Studies
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
TeachRock
Date Added:
09/03/2019
To Go to War?
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC
Rating

Students will be able to infer arguments both for and against the Colonies going to war and not going to war with Great Britain based on a short video clip from the movie "The Patriot."

Subject:
History
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Author:
Robert Campbell
Date Added:
07/14/2017
The United Farm Workers and the Delano Grape Strike
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
Rating

This collection uses primary sources to explore the United Farm Workers and the Delano Grape Strike. Digital Public Library of America Primary Source Sets are designed to help students develop their critical thinking skills and draw diverse material from libraries, archives, and museums across the United States. Each set includes an overview, ten to fifteen primary sources, links to related resources, and a teaching guide. These sets were created and reviewed by the teachers on the DPLA's Education Advisory Committee.

Subject:
U.S. History
Ethnic Studies
Material Type:
Primary Source
Provider:
Digital Public Library of America
Provider Set:
Primary Source Sets
Author:
Franky Abbott
Date Added:
04/11/2016
“We Shall Overcome”  Civil Rights Movement of the 1950s and 60s.
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CC BY-NC
Rating

The Civil Rights Movement for African American equality is one of the defining social movements of the 1950s and 60s.  Ordinary people took to the streets to demand equality.  This lesson will explore the various forms of protest that defined the movement.  Two of the most notable leaders of the movement were Martin Luther King, Jr. and Malcolm X.  While both men shared the common goal of equality, their approaches were very different.  Martin Luther King preached nonviolent civil disobedience, while Malcolm X demanded equality “by any means necessary.” You will examine famous speeches and articles written by both men to form your own opinion of which approach is more effective to have your demands met.StandardsCC.8.5.11-12.FCC.8.6.9-10.GCC.8.3.12.D

Subject:
Reading Informational Text
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Author:
Tracy Rains
Date Added:
01/02/2018