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Diversity and Multi-Cultural Education in the 21st Century
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CC BY-NC-SA
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In this course in addition to culture, we will learn about norms, values, systems of beliefs, social interaction, verbal and non-verbal communication, race and ethnicity, sex, sexual orientation and gender, technology and culture, cultural universalism and relativism and how these affect our shared or distinct day to day cultural practices and social interaction in our various communities. Students will share their day-to-day social interactions, travels, and cross - cultural experiences in and around New York City.

Subject:
Education
Material Type:
Textbook
Provider:
CUNY Academic Works
Author:
Dr. Remi Alapo
Date Added:
07/14/2022
English Language Arts, Grade 12, Social Class and the Law
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The laws that govern and the social norms that regulate society are not always fair, legal, moral, or ethical. What is a person to do about all this injustice? What are the hazards of righting injustices or changing social norms? And what are the dangers of doing nothing?

ACCOMPLISHMENTS

Students read and annotate Antigone, “Letter from a Birmingham Jail,” and Pygmalion.
Students write a literary analysis showing the effect of social class or the law on a character’s life.

GUIDING QUESTIONS

These questions are a guide to stimulate thinking, discussion, and writing on the themes and ideas in the unit. For complete and thoughtful answers and for meaningful discussions, students must use evidence based on careful reading of the texts.

How do social class and legal institutions shape literary characters’ lives (and presumably our lives)?
How does social class affect a person in dealing with the law (protect a person, hurt a person)?
How is social class determined in America and in other places in the world?

BENCHMARK ASSESSMENT: Cold Read

During this unit, on a day of your choosing, we recommend you administer a Cold Read to assess students’ reading comprehension. For this assessment, students read a text they have never seen before and then respond to multiple-choice and constructed-response questions. The assessment is not included in this course materials.

Subject:
English Language Arts
Reading Informational Text
Reading Literature
Speaking and Listening
Material Type:
Unit of Study
Provider:
Pearson
Introduction to Sociology 2e
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
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Introduction to Sociology 2e adheres to the scope and sequence of a typical, one-semester introductory sociology course. It offers comprehensive coverage of core concepts, foundational scholars, and emerging theories, which are supported by a wealth of engaging learning materials. The textbook presents detailed section reviews with rich questions, discussions that help students apply their knowledge, and features that draw learners into the discipline in meaningful ways. The second edition retains the book’s conceptual organization, aligning to most courses, and has been significantly updated to reflect the latest research and provide examples most relevant to today’s students. In order to help instructors transition to the revised version, the 2e changes are described within the preface.

Subject:
Social Science
Sociology
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
Rice University
Provider Set:
OpenStax College
Date Added:
02/01/2012
Introduction to Sociology 2e, Culture, Elements of Culture
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
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Understand how values and beliefs differ from normsExplain the significance of symbols and language to a cultureExplain the Sapir-Whorf hypothesisDiscuss the role of social control within culture

Subject:
Social Science
Sociology
Material Type:
Module
Provider:
Rice University
Provider Set:
OpenStax College
Date Added:
11/15/2016
Metaethics from a First Person Standpoint: An Introduction to Moral Philosophy
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CC BY
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Metaethics from a First Person Standpoint addresses in a novel format the major topics and themes of contemporary metaethics, the study of the analysis of moral thought and judgement. Metathetics is less concerned with what practices are right or wrong than with what we mean by ‘right’ and ‘wrong.’
Looking at a wide spectrum of topics including moral language, realism and anti-realism, reasons and motives, relativism, and moral progress, this book engages students and general readers in order to enhance their understanding of morality and moral discourse as cultural practices. Catherine Wilson innovatively employs a first-person narrator to report step-by-step an individual’s reflections, beginning from a position of radical scepticism, on the possibility of objective moral knowledge. The reader is invited to follow along with this reasoning, and to challenge or agree with each major point. Incrementally, the narrator is led to certain definite conclusions about ‘oughts’ and norms in connection with self-interest, prudence, social norms, and finally morality. Scepticism is overcome, and the narrator arrives at a good understanding of how moral knowledge and moral progress are possible, though frequently long in coming.
Accessibly written, Metaethics from a First Person Standpoint presupposes no prior training in philosophy and is a must-read for philosophers, students and general readers interested in gaining a better understanding of morality as a personal philosophical quest.

Subject:
Philosophy
Material Type:
Textbook
Provider:
Open Book Publishers
Author:
Catherine Wilson
Date Added:
06/28/2019
PSY101 - Topic 10 - Social Psychology
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CC BY-NC-SA
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Topic 10: Social PsychologyTextbook readings: pp. 409-410; pp. 417-418; pp. 428-429; pp. 441-443.Watch: [Descriptions from the website]Milgram Obedience Study - Why should you question authority? The answer lies within this ground breaking social psychology experiment by Stanley Milgram regarding human behavior and authority.The Stanford Prison Experiment - The Stanford Prison Experiment, a dramatic simulation study of the psychology of imprisonment and one of the best known psychology experiments ever undertaken.Dr. Zimbardo takes us through the Stanford Prison Experiment, in which healthy college students are transformed into unstable prisoners and brutal prison guards within days by the power of the situation in which they found themselves.Learning objectives:1.      Define social psychology.2.      Describe Zimbardo’s Stanford Prison Experiment and its results. Note how social roles, norms and scripts may have affected human behavior in this study.3.      Describe Milgram’s Obedience to Authority Experiment and its results.4.      Describe how the “bystander effect” and “diffusion of responsibility” may have influenced the Kitty Genovese event.5.      Describe how prosocial behavior, altruism and empathy are related to one another.

Subject:
Psychology
Material Type:
Module
Author:
Annemarie Roscello
Date Added:
06/08/2017
Perspectives on deviance: Differential association, labeling theory, and strain theory
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CC BY-NC-SA
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When a norm is violated, it's referred to as deviance. And though the word, deviance, seems negative, it's not. It simply means that an individual's behaving differently from what society feels is normal behavior.

Subject:
Sociology
Material Type:
Lesson
Provider:
Khan Academy
Author:
Jeffrey Walsh
Date Added:
12/27/2017
Self-Regulation and Conscientiousness
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CC BY-NC-SA
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Self-regulation means changing oneself based on standards, that is, ideas of how one should or should not be. It is a centrally important capacity that contributes to socially desirable behavior, including moral behavior. Effective self-regulation requires knowledge of standards for proper behavior, careful monitoring of one’s actions and feelings, and the ability to make desired changes.

Subject:
Psychology
Material Type:
Module
Provider:
Diener Education Fund
Provider Set:
Noba
Author:
Roy F. Baumeister
Date Added:
10/31/2022
Sustaining the Commons
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CC BY-NC-ND
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In this book you will learn about institutions–the rules and norms that guide the interactions among us. Those rules and norms can be found from traffic rules, rules in sports, regulations on when and where alcohol can be consumed, to constitutional rules that define who can become president of the United States of America. Rules and norms guide us to cooperative outcomes of so-called collective action problems. If we rely on voluntary contributions only to get anything done, this may not lead to the best results. But research also shows that coercion of people to comply to strict rules do not necessary lead to good outcomes. What combination of sticks and carrots is needed to be successful to solve collective action problems such as sustaining the commons?

Subject:
Economics
Material Type:
Textbook
Author:
John Anderies
Marco Janssen
Date Added:
11/13/2018