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  • Matthew Makel
7 Easy Steps to Open Science: An Annotated Reading List
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CC BY
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The Open Science movement is rapidly changing the scientific landscape. Because exact definitions are often lacking and reforms are constantly evolving, accessible guides to open science are needed. This paper provides an introduction to open science and related reforms in the form of an annotated reading list of seven peer-reviewed articles, following the format of Etz et al. (2018). Written for researchers and students - particularly in psychological science - it highlights and introduces seven topics: understanding open science; open access; open data, materials, and code; reproducible analyses; preregistration and registered reports; replication research; and teaching open science. For each topic, we provide a detailed summary of one particularly informative and actionable article and suggest several further resources. Supporting a broader understanding of open science issues, this overview should enable researchers to engage with, improve, and implement current open, transparent, reproducible, replicable, and cumulative scientific practices.

Subject:
Applied Science
Life Science
Physical Science
Social Science
Material Type:
Reading
Author:
Alexander Etz
Amy Orben
Hannah Moshontz
Jesse Niebaum
Johnny van Doorn
Matthew Makel
Michael Schulte-Mecklenbeck
Sam Parsons
Sophia Crüwell
Date Added:
08/12/2019
Questionable and Open Research Practices in Education Research
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
Rating

Discussions of how to improve research quality are predominant in a number of fields, including education. But how prevalent are the use of problematic practices and the improved practices meant to counter them? This baseline information will be a critical data source as education researchers seek to improve our research practices. In this preregistered study, we replicated and extended previous studies from other fields by asking education researchers about 10 questionable research practices and 5 open research practices. We asked them to estimate the prevalence of the practices in the field, self-report their own use of such practices, and estimate the appropriateness of these behaviors in education research. We made predictions under four umbrella categories: comparison to psychology, geographic location, career stage, and quantitative orientation. Broadly, our results suggest that both questionable and open research practices are part of the typical research practices of many educational researchers. Preregistration, code, and data can be found at https://osf.io/83mwk/.

Subject:
Education
Material Type:
Reading
Author:
Bryan G. Cook
Jaret Hodges
Jonathan Plucker
Matthew C. Makel
Date Added:
08/07/2020