Keywords: 1970s (20)

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58. A Time of Malaise
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58. A Time of Malaise

Something was terribly wrong in America in the 1970s. The United States ... (more)

Something was terribly wrong in America in the 1970s. The United States was supposed to be a superpower, yet American forces proved powerless to stop a tiny guerrilla force in Vietnam. Support for Israel in the Middle East led to a rash of terrorism against American citizens traveling abroad, as well a punitive oil embargo that stifled the economy and forced American motorists to wait hours for their next tank of gasoline. (less)

Subject:
History, Law, Politics
Material Type:
Images and Illustrations
Readings
Provider:
Independence Hall Association
Provider Set:
US History
58b. The Sickened Economy
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58b. The Sickened Economy

Nothing fuels a strong case of malaise like a sputtering economy. The ... (more)

Nothing fuels a strong case of malaise like a sputtering economy. The United States had grown accustomed to steady economic growth since the end of World War II. Recessions were short and were followed by robust economic growth. For the first time since the Great Depression, Americans faced an economy that could result in a lower standard of living for their children. (less)

Subject:
History, Law, Politics
Material Type:
Images and Illustrations
Readings
Provider:
Independence Hall Association
Provider Set:
US History
58c. Foreign Woes
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58c. Foreign Woes

America sank deeper into malaise when it looked around at what was ... (more)

America sank deeper into malaise when it looked around at what was going on in the rest of the world. The decade began with America's longest war ending in its first decisive military defeat in its 200-year-history. Diplomacy seemed powerless to stop the economic dependence of the United States on the volatile Middle East for a steady supply of oil. Terrorists from this region and others threatened heads of state and ordinary citizens around the globe. Despite an auspicious start, relations with the Soviet Union deteriorated by the end of the decade. (less)

Subject:
History, Law, Politics
Material Type:
Images and Illustrations
Readings
Provider:
Independence Hall Association
Provider Set:
US History
58d. Finding Oneself
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58d. Finding Oneself

Across the land, Americans seemed determined to escape from the wars and ... (more)

Across the land, Americans seemed determined to escape from the wars and social movements of the previous decade. Disillusionment with national and global action led many to look inward and find solace in discovering more about themselves. (less)

Subject:
History, Law, Politics
Material Type:
Images and Illustrations
Readings
Provider:
Independence Hall Association
Provider Set:
US History
58e. The New Right
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58e. The New Right

The New Right was a combination of Christian religious leaders, conservative business ... (more)

The New Right was a combination of Christian religious leaders, conservative business bigwigs who claimed that environmental and labor regulations were undermining the competitiveness of American firms in the global market, and fringe political groups. (less)

Subject:
History, Law, Politics
Material Type:
Images and Illustrations
Readings
Provider:
Independence Hall Association
Provider Set:
US History
Allan Wilson and Mary-Clare King, still imageSite: DNA Interactive (www.dnai.org)
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Allan Wilson and Mary-Clare King, still imageSite: DNA Interactive (www.dnai.org)

Allan Wilson in the 1970s, and Mary-Claire King.

Subject:
History, Law, Politics
Material Type:
Images and Illustrations
Provider:
BiosciEdNet (BEN): Digital Library Portal for Teaching and Learning in the Biological Sciences
Provider Set:
BiosciEdNet (BEN): Digital Library Portal for Teaching and Learning in the Biological Sciences
Author:
David Micklos (Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory;DNA Learning Center X-AUDIENCE)
Elof Carlson (SUNY at Stony Brook;Biology Department X-AUDIENCE)
Garland Allen (Washington University at St. Louis;Biology Department X-AUDIENCE)
Jan Witkowski (Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory;Banbury Center X-AUDIENCE)
Paul Lombardo (University of Virginia;Center for Biomedical Ethics X-AUDIENCE)
Steven Selden (University of Maryland;Education Policy and Leadership Department X-AUDIENCE)
Arthur Kornberg, still imageSite: DNA Interactive (www.dnai.org)
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Arthur Kornberg, still imageSite: DNA Interactive (www.dnai.org)

Arthur Kornberg in the 1970s. Not long after Arber's discoveries, Arthur Kornberg ... (more)

Arthur Kornberg in the 1970s. Not long after Arber's discoveries, Arthur Kornberg identified the pasting mechanism for DNA, an enzyme he called ligase. Kornberg was trying to construct artificial viral DNA from viral fragments, but had been unable to make a biologically active molecule. Once he added ligase, however, he found that the enzyme made it possible to paste the ends of DNA molecules together. With ligase, the viral DNA he created formed a continuous loop, just as it did in the original virus. The artificial viral DNA was indeed biologically active 퉌_ it could reproduce on its own 퉌_ and Kornberg was hailed as having "made life in a test tube." (less)

Subject:
History, Law, Politics
Chemistry
Life Science
Material Type:
Images and Illustrations
Provider:
BiosciEdNet (BEN): Digital Library Portal for Teaching and Learning in the Biological Sciences
Provider Set:
BiosciEdNet (BEN): Digital Library Portal for Teaching and Learning in the Biological Sciences
Author:
David Micklos (Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory;DNA Learning Center X-AUDIENCE)
Elof Carlson (SUNY at Stony Brook;Biology Department X-AUDIENCE)
Garland Allen (Washington University at St. Louis;Biology Department X-AUDIENCE)
Jan Witkowski (Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory;Banbury Center X-AUDIENCE)
Paul Lombardo (University of Virginia;Center for Biomedical Ethics X-AUDIENCE)
Steven Selden (University of Maryland;Education Policy and Leadership Department X-AUDIENCE)
Chimp and human (mtDNA), 2D animationSite: DNA Interactive (www.dnai.org)
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Chimp and human (mtDNA), 2D animationSite: DNA Interactive (www.dnai.org)

In 1967, Allan Wilson and Vince Sarich published their estimate that the ... (more)

In 1967, Allan Wilson and Vince Sarich published their estimate that the human lineage had separated from the great apes five million years ago. This was based on a system where they measured the strength of the immune reaction of one species to a protein from another species. In the years that followed this startling research, Wilson and Sarich's work was confirmed using comparisons of DNA from the mitochondria of chimps and humans. In the 1970s, mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) became a common tool for the study of human history. (less)

Subject:
History, Law, Politics
Life Science
Material Type:
Instructional Material
Interactive
Readings
Provider:
BiosciEdNet (BEN): Digital Library Portal for Teaching and Learning in the Biological Sciences
Provider Set:
BiosciEdNet (BEN): Digital Library Portal for Teaching and Learning in the Biological Sciences
Author:
David Micklos (Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory;DNA Learning Center X-AUDIENCE)
Elof Carlson (SUNY at Stony Brook;Biology Department X-AUDIENCE)
Garland Allen (Washington University at St. Louis;Biology Department X-AUDIENCE)
Jan Witkowski (Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory;Banbury Center X-AUDIENCE)
Paul Lombardo (University of Virginia;Center for Biomedical Ethics X-AUDIENCE)
Steven Selden (University of Maryland;Education Policy and Leadership Department X-AUDIENCE)
Early DNA sequencing, 2D animationSite: DNA Interactive (www.dnai.org)
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Early DNA sequencing, 2D animationSite: DNA Interactive (www.dnai.org)

Two sequencing techniques were developed independently in the 1970s. The method developed ... (more)

Two sequencing techniques were developed independently in the 1970s. The method developed by Fred Sanger used chemically altered "dideoxy" bases to terminate newly synthesized DNA fragments at specific bases (either A, C, T, or G). These fragments are then size-separated, and the DNA sequence can be read. (less)

Subject:
History, Law, Politics
Life Science
Material Type:
Instructional Material
Interactive
Readings
Provider:
BiosciEdNet (BEN): Digital Library Portal for Teaching and Learning in the Biological Sciences
Provider Set:
BiosciEdNet (BEN): Digital Library Portal for Teaching and Learning in the Biological Sciences
Author:
David Micklos (Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory;DNA Learning Center X-AUDIENCE)
Elof Carlson (SUNY at Stony Brook;Biology Department X-AUDIENCE)
Garland Allen (Washington University at St. Louis;Biology Department X-AUDIENCE)
Jan Witkowski (Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory;Banbury Center X-AUDIENCE)
Paul Lombardo (University of Virginia;Center for Biomedical Ethics X-AUDIENCE)
Steven Selden (University of Maryland;Education Policy and Leadership Department X-AUDIENCE)
Economic History of Financial Crises, Fall 2009
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Economic History of Financial Crises, Fall 2009

" This course gives a historical perspective on financial panics. Topics include ... (more)

" This course gives a historical perspective on financial panics. Topics include the growth of the industrial world, the Great Depression and surrounding events, and more recent topics such as the first oil crisis, Japanese stagnation, and conditions following the financial crisis of 2008." (less)

Subject:
Business
Social Sciences
Material Type:
Activities and Labs
Full Course
Provider:
M.I.T.
Provider Set:
MIT OpenCourseWare
Author:
Temin, Peter
First time he heard about DNA, Herbert BoyerSite: DNA Interactive (www.dnai.org)
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First time he heard about DNA, Herbert BoyerSite: DNA Interactive (www.dnai.org)

Interviewee: Herbert Boyer DNAi Location:Timeline>1970s

Subject:
History, Law, Politics
Chemistry
Life Science
Education
Material Type:
Instructional Material
Video Lectures
Provider:
BiosciEdNet (BEN): Digital Library Portal for Teaching and Learning in the Biological Sciences
Provider Set:
BiosciEdNet (BEN): Digital Library Portal for Teaching and Learning in the Biological Sciences
Author:
David Micklos (Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory;DNA Learning Center X-AUDIENCE)
Elof Carlson (SUNY at Stony Brook;Biology Department X-AUDIENCE)
Garland Allen (Washington University at St. Louis;Biology Department X-AUDIENCE)
Jan Witkowski (Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory;Banbury Center X-AUDIENCE)
Paul Lombardo (University of Virginia;Center for Biomedical Ethics X-AUDIENCE)
Steven Selden (University of Maryland;Education Policy and Leadership Department X-AUDIENCE)
Gel electrophoresis, 2D animationSite: DNA Interactive (www.dnai.org)
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Gel electrophoresis, 2D animationSite: DNA Interactive (www.dnai.org)

In the early days of DNA manipulation, DNA fragments were laboriously separated ... (more)

In the early days of DNA manipulation, DNA fragments were laboriously separated by gravity. In the 1970s, the powerful tool of DNA gel electrophoresis was developed. This process uses electricity to separate DNA fragments by size as they migrate through a gel matrix. (less)

Subject:
History, Law, Politics
Life Science
Physics
Material Type:
Instructional Material
Interactive
Readings
Provider:
BiosciEdNet (BEN): Digital Library Portal for Teaching and Learning in the Biological Sciences
Provider Set:
BiosciEdNet (BEN): Digital Library Portal for Teaching and Learning in the Biological Sciences
Author:
David Micklos (Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory;DNA Learning Center X-AUDIENCE)
Elof Carlson (SUNY at Stony Brook;Biology Department X-AUDIENCE)
Garland Allen (Washington University at St. Louis;Biology Department X-AUDIENCE)
Jan Witkowski (Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory;Banbury Center X-AUDIENCE)
Paul Lombardo (University of Virginia;Center for Biomedical Ethics X-AUDIENCE)
Steven Selden (University of Maryland;Education Policy and Leadership Department X-AUDIENCE)
Genentech, still imageSite: DNA Interactive (www.dnai.org)
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Genentech, still imageSite: DNA Interactive (www.dnai.org)

Genentech, the first biotechnology company, established in 1976. In the 1970s, two ... (more)

Genentech, the first biotechnology company, established in 1976. In the 1970s, two biotech companies 퉌_ Genentech and Biogen 퉌_ took up the challenge of synthesizing insulin using recombinant DNA technology. Other non-commercial groups were also in on the quest to make human insulin. The idea was to insert the DNA sequence for human insulin into bacteria, and let the bacteria be the factory to produce unlimited quantities of insulin. (less)

Subject:
History, Law, Politics
Life Science
Technology
Material Type:
Images and Illustrations
Provider:
BiosciEdNet (BEN): Digital Library Portal for Teaching and Learning in the Biological Sciences
Provider Set:
BiosciEdNet (BEN): Digital Library Portal for Teaching and Learning in the Biological Sciences
Author:
David Micklos (Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory;DNA Learning Center X-AUDIENCE)
Elof Carlson (SUNY at Stony Brook;Biology Department X-AUDIENCE)
Garland Allen (Washington University at St. Louis;Biology Department X-AUDIENCE)
Jan Witkowski (Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory;Banbury Center X-AUDIENCE)
Paul Lombardo (University of Virginia;Center for Biomedical Ethics X-AUDIENCE)
Steven Selden (University of Maryland;Education Policy and Leadership Department X-AUDIENCE)
Government restrictions on working with recombinant DNA, Walter GilbertSite: DNA Interactive (www.dnai.org)
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Government restrictions on working with recombinant DNA, Walter GilbertSite: DNA Interactive (www.dnai.org)

Interviewee: Walter Gilbert DNAi Location:Manipulation>Production>players Insulin and the moratorium In the late ... (more)

Interviewee: Walter Gilbert DNAi Location:Manipulation>Production>players Insulin and the moratorium In the late 1970s, there was a moratorium on recombinant DNA work. Gilbert had to go to England's Porton Down facility to try and isolate human insulin. (less)

Subject:
History, Law, Politics
Chemistry
Life Science
Education
Material Type:
Instructional Material
Video Lectures
Provider:
BiosciEdNet (BEN): Digital Library Portal for Teaching and Learning in the Biological Sciences
Provider Set:
BiosciEdNet (BEN): Digital Library Portal for Teaching and Learning in the Biological Sciences
Author:
David Micklos (Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory;DNA Learning Center X-AUDIENCE)
Elof Carlson (SUNY at Stony Brook;Biology Department X-AUDIENCE)
Garland Allen (Washington University at St. Louis;Biology Department X-AUDIENCE)
Jan Witkowski (Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory;Banbury Center X-AUDIENCE)
Paul Lombardo (University of Virginia;Center for Biomedical Ethics X-AUDIENCE)
Steven Selden (University of Maryland;Education Policy and Leadership Department X-AUDIENCE)
Hospital at the Viriginia Colony, still imageSite: DNA Interactive (www.dnai.org)
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Hospital at the Viriginia Colony, still imageSite: DNA Interactive (www.dnai.org)

Hospital at the Viriginia Colony where Carrie Buck was sterilized. The Buck ... (more)

Hospital at the Viriginia Colony where Carrie Buck was sterilized. The Buck vs. Bell decision opened the floodgate of eugenic sterilization. Prior to the trial, 18 states had statutes under which about 6,000 sterilizations had been performed. By 1935, 30 states had statutes, and more than 21,000 had been sterilized. Almost half of all eugenic sterilizations took place in California, where a vocal eugenics lobby was led by Paul Popenoe, E.S. Gosney, F.W. Hatch, and David Starr Jordan. In 1942, the Supreme Court struck down a law allowing the involuntary sterilization of criminals, but it never reversed the general concept of eugenic sterilization. Although eugenic sterilizations slowed after World War II, some continued into the 1970s, by which time an estimated 60,000 Americans had been sterilized. (less)

Subject:
History, Law, Politics
Social Sciences
Material Type:
Images and Illustrations
Provider:
BiosciEdNet (BEN): Digital Library Portal for Teaching and Learning in the Biological Sciences
Provider Set:
BiosciEdNet (BEN): Digital Library Portal for Teaching and Learning in the Biological Sciences
Author:
David Micklos (Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory;DNA Learning Center X-AUDIENCE)
Elof Carlson (SUNY at Stony Brook;Biology Department X-AUDIENCE)
Garland Allen (Washington University at St. Louis;Biology Department X-AUDIENCE)
Jan Witkowski (Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory;Banbury Center X-AUDIENCE)
Paul Lombardo (University of Virginia;Center for Biomedical Ethics X-AUDIENCE)
Steven Selden (University of Maryland;Education Policy and Leadership Department X-AUDIENCE)
Linus Pauling (1970s), still imageSite: DNA Interactive (www.dnai.org)
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Linus Pauling (1970s), still imageSite: DNA Interactive (www.dnai.org)

Linus Pauling, circa 1970s.

Subject:
History, Law, Politics
Material Type:
Images and Illustrations
Provider:
BiosciEdNet (BEN): Digital Library Portal for Teaching and Learning in the Biological Sciences
Provider Set:
BiosciEdNet (BEN): Digital Library Portal for Teaching and Learning in the Biological Sciences
Author:
David Micklos (Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory;DNA Learning Center X-AUDIENCE)
Elof Carlson (SUNY at Stony Brook;Biology Department X-AUDIENCE)
Garland Allen (Washington University at St. Louis;Biology Department X-AUDIENCE)
Jan Witkowski (Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory;Banbury Center X-AUDIENCE)
Paul Lombardo (University of Virginia;Center for Biomedical Ethics X-AUDIENCE)
Steven Selden (University of Maryland;Education Policy and Leadership Department X-AUDIENCE)
Neandertal and human (mtDNA), 2D animationSite: DNA Interactive (www.dnai.org)
Read the Fine Print

Neandertal and human (mtDNA), 2D animationSite: DNA Interactive (www.dnai.org)

In 1997, German researchers isolated DNA fragments from a 30,000 year old ... (more)

In 1997, German researchers isolated DNA fragments from a 30,000 year old Neandertal bone. The fragments came from the Neandertal's mitochondria 퀌˘?퉌ń energy-producing organelles scattered in large numbers throughout cells. Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) has been used for human evolutionary studies since the 1970s. When comparing Neandertal and human mtDNA, researchers found that the differences between the sequences put Neandertals outside the range of variation of modern humans. (less)

Subject:
History, Law, Politics
Mathematics
Life Science
Material Type:
Instructional Material
Interactive
Readings
Provider:
BiosciEdNet (BEN): Digital Library Portal for Teaching and Learning in the Biological Sciences
Provider Set:
BiosciEdNet (BEN): Digital Library Portal for Teaching and Learning in the Biological Sciences
Author:
David Micklos (Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory;DNA Learning Center X-AUDIENCE)
Elof Carlson (SUNY at Stony Brook;Biology Department X-AUDIENCE)
Garland Allen (Washington University at St. Louis;Biology Department X-AUDIENCE)
Jan Witkowski (Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory;Banbury Center X-AUDIENCE)
Paul Lombardo (University of Virginia;Center for Biomedical Ethics X-AUDIENCE)
Steven Selden (University of Maryland;Education Policy and Leadership Department X-AUDIENCE)
Sequencing DNA, 2D animationSite: DNA Interactive (www.dnai.org)
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Sequencing DNA, 2D animationSite: DNA Interactive (www.dnai.org)

Techniques to read the sequence of DNA, letter by letter, have been ... (more)

Techniques to read the sequence of DNA, letter by letter, have been available since the 1970s. However, the massive task of sequencing the three billion basepairs of the human genome required machines that could read and interpret the data. (less)

Subject:
History, Law, Politics
Chemistry
Life Science
Material Type:
Instructional Material
Interactive
Provider:
BiosciEdNet (BEN): Digital Library Portal for Teaching and Learning in the Biological Sciences
Provider Set:
BiosciEdNet (BEN): Digital Library Portal for Teaching and Learning in the Biological Sciences
Author:
David Micklos (Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory;DNA Learning Center X-AUDIENCE)
Elof Carlson (SUNY at Stony Brook;Biology Department X-AUDIENCE)
Garland Allen (Washington University at St. Louis;Biology Department X-AUDIENCE)
Jan Witkowski (Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory;Banbury Center X-AUDIENCE)
Paul Lombardo (University of Virginia;Center for Biomedical Ethics X-AUDIENCE)
Steven Selden (University of Maryland;Education Policy and Leadership Department X-AUDIENCE)
Walter Gilbert (1986), still imageSite: DNA Interactive (www.dnai.org)
Read the Fine Print

Walter Gilbert (1986), still imageSite: DNA Interactive (www.dnai.org)

image of Walter Gilbert. Already a well-known and respected scientist, Gilbert co-founded ... (more)

image of Walter Gilbert. Already a well-known and respected scientist, Gilbert co-founded a biotech company 퉌_ Biogen 퉌_ in the late 1970s. Today, Biogen is one of the largest biotech companies in the world. (less)

Subject:
History, Law, Politics
Material Type:
Images and Illustrations
Provider:
BiosciEdNet (BEN): Digital Library Portal for Teaching and Learning in the Biological Sciences
Provider Set:
BiosciEdNet (BEN): Digital Library Portal for Teaching and Learning in the Biological Sciences
Author:
David Micklos (Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory;DNA Learning Center X-AUDIENCE)
Elof Carlson (SUNY at Stony Brook;Biology Department X-AUDIENCE)
Garland Allen (Washington University at St. Louis;Biology Department X-AUDIENCE)
Jan Witkowski (Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory;Banbury Center X-AUDIENCE)
Paul Lombardo (University of Virginia;Center for Biomedical Ethics X-AUDIENCE)
Steven Selden (University of Maryland;Education Policy and Leadership Department X-AUDIENCE)
human and mtDNA variation, 2D animationSite: DNA Interactive (www.dnai.org)
Read the Fine Print

human and mtDNA variation, 2D animationSite: DNA Interactive (www.dnai.org)

In 1997, German researchers isolated DNA fragments from a 30,000 year old ... (more)

In 1997, German researchers isolated DNA fragments from a 30,000 year old Neandertal bone. The fragments came from the Neandertal's mitochondria 퀌˘?퉌ń energy-producing organelles scattered in large numbers throughout cells. Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) has been used for human evolutionary studies since the 1970s. When comparing Neandertal and human mtDNA, researchers found that the differences between the sequences put Neandertals outside the range of variation of modern humans. (less)

Subject:
History, Law, Politics
Mathematics
Life Science
Material Type:
Instructional Material
Interactive
Readings
Provider:
BiosciEdNet (BEN): Digital Library Portal for Teaching and Learning in the Biological Sciences
Provider Set:
BiosciEdNet (BEN): Digital Library Portal for Teaching and Learning in the Biological Sciences
Author:
David Micklos (Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory;DNA Learning Center X-AUDIENCE)
Elof Carlson (SUNY at Stony Brook;Biology Department X-AUDIENCE)
Garland Allen (Washington University at St. Louis;Biology Department X-AUDIENCE)
Jan Witkowski (Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory;Banbury Center X-AUDIENCE)
Paul Lombardo (University of Virginia;Center for Biomedical Ethics X-AUDIENCE)
Steven Selden (University of Maryland;Education Policy and Leadership Department X-AUDIENCE)
2002 llaF ,gnivloS melborP gnireenignE dna sretupmoC ot noitcudortnI

2002 llaF ,gnivloS melborP gnireenignE dna sretupmoC ot noitcudortnI

.desu si egaugnal gnimmargorp avaJ ehT .gninnalp dna ,tnemeganam ,ecneics ,gnireenigne ni ... (more)

.desu si egaugnal gnimmargorp avaJ ehT .gninnalp dna ,tnemeganam ,ecneics ,gnireenigne ni smelborp gnivlos rof seuqinhcet gnipoleved no si sisahpmE .scipot decnavda detceles dna scihparg retupmoc ,gnihcraes dna gnitros ,serutcurts atad ,sdohtem laciremun ,secafretni resu lacihparg ,stpecnoc gnimmargorp revoc smelborp gnimmargorp ylkeeW .esruoc eht fo sucof eht si tnempoleved dna ngised erawtfos detneiro-tcejbO .snoitacilppa cifitneics dna gnireenigne rof sdohtem lanoitatupmoc dna tnempoleved erawtfos latnemadnuf stneserp esruoc sihT (less)