All resources in Lincoln University

Fundamentals of Electrical Engineering I

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From its beginnings in the late nineteenth century, electrical engineering has blossomed from focusing on electrical circuits for power, telegraphy and telephony to focusing on a much broader range of disciplines. However, the underlying themes are relevant today: Power creation and transmission and information have been the underlying themes of electrical engineering for a century and a half. This course concentrates on the latter theme: the representation, manipulation, transmission, and reception of information by electrical means. This course describes what information is, how engineers quantify information, and how electrical signals represent information.

Material Type: Full Course

Author: Don Johnson

Public Policy Analysis for Engineers

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Public policy issues are important to every field of engineering. Yet, most engineering students know little about the topic. For most students, however, an entire course focused on the topic is not necessary. For example, a class on engineering design could incorporate a case study on 3D printing policy. This course will introduce students to the interrelationship of engineering and public policy, how to conduct neutral policy analysis, and then apply that knowledge in case studies to practice the skills they have learned. The modules takes a flipped classroom/active learning approach by using short videos to educate students, activities to practice the skills taught, and incorporates real-world examples such as hydraulic fracturing, drones, and 3D printing.

Material Type: Full Course

Forensic Engineering: Learning from Failures

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What do collapsed buildings, infected hospital patients, and crashed airplanes have in common? If you know the causes of these events and conditions, they can all be prevented. In this course, you will learn how to use the TU Delft mind-set to investigate the causes of such events so you can prevent them in the future. When, for instance, hundreds of hospital patients worldwide got infected after having gall bladder treatments, forensic engineering helped reveal how the design and use of the medical instruments could cause such widespread infections. As a result, changes were made to the instrument design and the procedural protocols in hospitals. Learning from failure in this case benefitted patient health and safety across the world. After taking this course you will have an understanding of failures and the investigation processes used to find their causes. You will learn how to apply lessons gained from investigating previous failures into new designs and procedures.

Material Type: Full Course

Authors: Arjo Loeve, Karel Terwel, Michiel Schuurman

Biomedical Engineering Design

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This course presents a design philosophy and a design approach, dedicated to rehabilitation technology. This field was selected because of human-machine interaction is inherent and vital. Illustrative examples will be discussed by their entire design process

Material Type: Activity/Lab, Assessment, Full Course, Lecture Notes, Reading

Author: D.H. Plettenburg

Sustainability and engineering

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This module is intended to give you a broad understanding of issues related to environmental sustainability in the context of engineering. The environmental problems facing our world are becoming more apparent day by day, and the term “sustainability” is used more frequently in the media. This module will explore the concept of sustainability and discuss some of the issues surrounding the subject. Each chapter will begin with an overview of the content, and will then introduce key factors and the current world systems in place for the subject matter such as energy, materials, food, water and shelter. The social and economic factors of sustainability in an engineering context will also be covered. The problems associated with these systems will then be highlighted, specifically their environmental or social impacts and what part of the systems that could be considered unsustainable. Alternatives will then be introduced and outlined including what options there are and what are the challenges involved in implementing them. School of Engineering, University of Nottingham

Material Type: Full Course, Lesson, Module

Author: Aran Eales

Fundamentals of Transportation

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This book is aimed at undergraduate civil engineering students, though the material may provide a useful review for practitioners and graduate students in transportation. Typically, this would be for an Introduction to Transportation course, which might be taken by most students in their sophomore or junior year. Often this is the first engineering course students take, which requires a switch in thinking from simply solving given problems to formulating the problem mathematically before solving it, i.e. from straight-forward calculation often found in undergraduate Calculus to vaguer word problems more reflective of the real world.

Material Type: Textbook

Control Systems

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Control Systems is an inter-disciplinary engineering text that analyzes the effects and interactions of mathematical systems. This book is for third and fourth year undergraduates in an engineering program.

Material Type: Textbook

English Composition 1

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Composition I focuses on principles of writing, critical reading and essay composition using rhetorical styles common in college-level writing (narrative, example/illustration, compare/contrast, cause-and-effect, argument).

Material Type: Full Course, Textbook

English Composition 2

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Composition 2 is an expository writing course requiring more advanced writing skills than Composition 1, yet reviewing and incorporating some of the same skills. This course teaches research skills by emphasizing the development of advanced analytical/critical reading skills, proficiency in investigative research, and the writing of persuasive prose including documented and researched argumentative essays. A major component of this course will be an emphasis on the research process and information literacy.

Material Type: Full Course, Textbook

U.S. History

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 U.S. History is designed to meet the scope and sequence requirements of most introductory courses. The text provides a balanced approach to U.S. history, considering the people, events, and ideas that have shaped the United States from both the top down (politics, economics, diplomacy) and bottom up (eyewitness accounts, lived experience). U.S. History covers key forces that form the American experience, with particular attention to issues of race, class, and gender.Senior Contributing AuthorsP. Scott Corbett, Ventura CollegeVolker Janssen, California State University, FullertonJohn M. Lund, Keene State CollegeTodd Pfannestiel, Clarion UniversityPaul Vickery, Oral Roberts UniversitySylvie Waskiewicz

Material Type: Full Course

U.S. History

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U.S. History is designed to meet the scope and sequence requirements of most introductory courses. The text provides a balanced approach to U.S. history, considering the people, events, and ideas that have shaped the United States from both the top down (politics, economics, diplomacy) and bottom up (eyewitness accounts, lived experience). U.S. History covers key forces that form the American experience, with particular attention to issues of race, class, and gender.

Material Type: Textbook

Authors: John M. Lund, Paul Vickery, P. Scott Corbett, Sylvie Waskiewicz, Todd Pfannestiel, Volker Janssen

Journalism, 'Fake News' and Disinformation: A Handbook for Journalism Education and Training

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This new publication by UNESCO is a timely resource and highly topical subject for all those who practice or teach journalism in this Digital Age. UNESCO's new handbook is an essential addition to teaching syllabi for all journalism educators, as well as practising journalists and editors who are interested in information, how we share it and how we use it. It is mission critical that those who practice journalism understand and report on the new threats to trusted information. Political parties, health professionals, business people, scientists, election monitors and others will also find the handbook useful in navigating the information disorder. Written by experts in the fight against disinformation, this handbook explores the very nature of journalism - with modules on why trust matters; thinking critically about how digital technology and social platforms are conduits of the information disorder; fighting back against disinformation and misinformation through media and information literacy; fact-checking 101; social media verification and combating online abuse. The seven individual modules are available online to download that enables readers to develop their own course relevant to their media environment. This handbook is also useful for the library and information science professionals, students, and LIS educators for understanding the different dimensions of fake news and disinformation. Table of Contents Module One | Truth, Trust and Journalism: Why it Matters | by Cherilyn Ireton Module Two | Thinking about "Information Disorder": Formats of Misinformation, Disinformation and Mal-Information | by Claire Wardle & Hossein Derakshan Module Three | News Industry Transformation: Digital Technology, Social Platforms and the Spread of Misinformation and Disinformation |by Julie Posetti Module Four | Combatting Disinformation and Misinformation Through Media and Information Literacy (MIL) | by Magda Abu-Fadil Module Five | Fact-Checking 101 | by Alexios Mantzarlis Module Six | Social Media Verification: Assessing Sources and Visual Content | by Tom Trewinnard and Fergus Bell Module Seven | Combatting Online Abuse: When Journalists and Their Sources are Targeted | by Julie Posetti Additional Resources: https://en.unesco.org/fightfakenews

Material Type: Full Course, Module, Textbook, Unit of Study

Authors: Alexios Mantzarlis, Cherilyn Ireton, Claire Wardle, Fergus Bell, Hossein Derakshan, Julie Posetti, Magda Abu-Fadil, Tom Trewinnard

Mathematics for the Liberal Arts

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This course was originally developed for the Open Course Library project.  The text used is Math in Society, edited by David Lippman, Pierce College Ft Steilacoom.  Development of this book was supported, in part, by the Transition Math Project and the Open Course Library Project. Topics covered in the course include problem solving, voting theory, graph theory, growth models, finance, data collection and description, and probability.

Material Type: Full Course, Textbook

Author: David Lippman

Introductory Statistics

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Introductory Statistics follows scope and sequence requirements of a one-semester introduction to statistics course and is geared toward students majoring in fields other than math or engineering. The text assumes some knowledge of intermediate algebra and focuses on statistics application over theory. Introductory Statistics includes innovative practical applications that make the text relevant and accessible, as well as collaborative exercises, technology integration problems, and statistics labs.

Material Type: Textbook

Authors: Barbara Ilowsky, Susan Dean