Lincoln University

This group is a space for Lincoln University faculty to share, evaluate, and transform Open Education Resources. Resources have been added in each discipline to provide a starting point for those getting familiar with OER.
6 members | 114 affiliated resources

All resources in Lincoln University

Intro to Agricultural Mechanics Model

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***LOGIN REQUIRED*** Intro to Ag Mechanics prepares students for careers related to the construction, operation, and maintenance of equipment used by the agriculture industry. Topics will include safety, woodworking, electrical systems, plumbing, cold metal work, concrete, and welding technology.

Material Type: Full Course, Lesson Plan

Agriscience / Intro to Agriculture

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***LOGIN REQUIRED*** The Agriscience/Intro to Agriculture course helps students acquire a broad understanding of a variety of agricultural areas, develop an awareness of the many career opportunities in agriculture, participate in occupationally relevant experiences, and work cooperatively with a group to develop and expand leadership abilities. Students study California agriculture, agricultural business, agricultural technologies, natural resources, and animal, plant, and soil sciences.

Material Type: Full Course, Lesson Plan

Agricultural Business Model

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***LOGIN REQUIRED*** Students will learn about agricultural business operation and management. Topics will include accounting, finance, economics, business organization, marketing, and sales. Students will learn about agricultural business operation and management. Topics will include accounting, finance, economics, business organization, marketing, and sales.

Material Type: Full Course, Lesson Plan

Farmer's Agribusiness Training Course: Module 4 - ICT in Support of Farming. Lesson 3 : Record Keeping II

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This Farmers' Agribusiness training course has been developed to help both farmers and farmer organisations. Its intention is to provide access to provide access to additional skills and knowledge that will allow farmers to move from a 'farm' to a 'firm'. This lesson provides information on what farming activities could be considered 'Enterprises' and incorporated into an Enterprise Accounting spreadsheet, how to use functions to calculate totals and averages within the spreadsheet program, customise formula using a spreadsheet program and how to customise the Enterprise accounting template.

Material Type: Textbook

Author: Moore, Andrew

Introduction to Permaculture

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Permaculture Design is a method of land planning that can be applied at scales from the home garden to city block to village to farm. It is an ethically based whole-systems design approach that uses concepts, principles, and methods derived from ecosystems, indigenous technologies, and other time-tested practices to create sustainable human settlements and institutions. Although rooted in horticulture and agriculture, Permaculture design is interdisciplinary, touching on a wide range of subjects including regional planning, ecology, animal husbandry, appropriate technology, architecture, social justice, and international development. This open text book is derived from the content of the Massive Open Online Course “Intro to Permaculture”. The original course also included interactive mapping and design tools that accompanied this content. The course and book provide a general overview of the Permaculture design system. The book can be downloaded as a print version. However, there are many accompanying videos and content pages that are linked to throughout the text, so it is best viewed online where the links can be accessed.

Material Type: Textbook

Author: Andrew Millison

Animal Science

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***LOGIN REQUIRED*** In the Animal Science course, students study large, small, and specialty animals. Students explore the necessary elements--such as diet, genetics, habitat, and behavior--to create humane, ecologically and economically sustainable animal production systems.

Material Type: Full Course, Lesson Plan

Food and the Future Environment

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The Future of Food is an introductory-level science course that emphasizes the challenges facing food systems in the 21st century, and issues of sustainability for agriculture and other food production activities, as well as the challenges posed by food insecurity and modern diets to human health and well-being. Topics covered include introduction to the coupled-system perspective, historical development of food systems, socioeconomic aspects of the food system, interaction of the food system with the Earth's environment including soil, water, biota and climate, and the future of the food system considering potential changes such as in climate, urbanization, and demography.

Material Type: Full Course

Author: NULL

Forestry and Natural Resources Model

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***LOGIN REQUIRED*** The Forestry and Natural Resources Course helps students understand the relationships between California's natural resources and the environment. Topics include energy and nutrient cycles, water resources and management, soil conservation, wildlife preservation and management, forest and fire management, lumber production, the outdoor recreation industry and multiple-use management.

Material Type: Full Course, Lesson Plan

Plant and Soil Science Model

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***LOGIN REQUIRED*** Plant and Soil Science covers topics such as plant classification, physiology, reproduction, plant breeding, biotechnology, and pathology. Students will learn about soil management, water, pests, and equipment as well as cultural and harvest practices.

Material Type: Full Course, Lesson Plan

Food Production, Public Health, and the Environment

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This course provides an understanding of the complex and challenging public health issue of food security and in a world where one billion people are under-nourished while another billion are overweight. Explores the connections among diet, the current food and food animal production systems, the environment and public health, considering factors such as economics, population and equity. Case studies are used to examine these complex relationships and as well as alternative approaches to achieving both local and global food security and the important role public health can play. Guest lecturers include experts from a variety of disciplines and experiences.

Material Type: Full Course, Homework/Assignment, Lecture, Reading, Syllabus

Authors: Bob Lawrence, Polly Walker

Society, Economy, and the Environment

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This course will use a complex systems theory perspective to investigate how coupled human-environment systems interact to either increase or decrease their risk of collapse. This complex systems approach works across many disciplines, so that human-environment linkages can be understood from sociological, environmental science, and economic viewpoints.

Material Type: Activity/Lab, Full Course, Homework/Assignment, Reading, Syllabus

Art Appreciation and Techniques

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This course is an exploration of visual art forms and their cultural connections for the student with little experience in the visual arts. It includes a brief study of art history and in depth studies of the elements, media, and methods used in creative processes and thought. Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to: interpret examples of visual art using a five-step critical process that includes description, analysis, context, meaning, and judgment; identify and describe the elements and principles of art; use analytical skills to connect formal attributes of art with their meaning and expression; explain the role and effect of the visual arts in societies, history, and other world cultures; articulate the political, social, cultural, and aesthetic themes and issues that artists examine in their work; identify the processes and materials involved in art and architectural production; utilize information to locate, evaluate, and communicate information about visual art in its various forms. Note that this course is an alternative to the Saylor FoundationĺÎĺ_ĺĚĺ_s ARTH101A and has been developed through a partnership with the Washington State Board for Community and Technical Colleges; the Saylor Foundation has modified some WSBCTC materials. This free course may be completed online at any time. (Art History 101B)

Material Type: Assessment, Full Course, Homework/Assignment, Reading, Syllabus

Modern Art and Mass Culture, Spring 2012

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This class provides an introduction to modern art and theories of modernism and postmodernism. It focuses on the way artists use the tension between fine art and mass culture to mobilize a critique of both. We will examine objects of visual art, including painting, sculpture, architecture, photography, prints, performance and video. These objects will be viewed in their interaction with advertising, caricature, comics, graffiti, television, fashion, folk art, and "primitive" art.

Material Type: Full Course

Author: Caroline Jones

Art of Ancient Greece and Rome

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In this course, the student will study the art of Classical Antiquity. The different units of the course reflect the main chronological stages in art development in Ancient Greece and Rome, from the coming together of the Greek city-state and the emergence of ĺÎĺĺĺŤgeometric art (around 900 B.C.) to the fourth century A.D. shift that took place within Roman culture and art due to the growing influence of Christianity. Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to: Explain why ancient Greek and Roman art can be studied together as ĺÎĺĺĺŤthe art of Classical Antiquity; Trace the timeline of major events in Ancient Greece and Rome; Link important developments in the history of Ancient Greece and Rome to specific geographical contexts; Explain how important historical developments and social-historical contexts had an impact on artĺÎĺĺÎĺs evolution in Ancient Greece and Rome; Identify the important stylistic and technical developments of Ancient Greek and Roman art; Discuss important artworks, presenting relevant information on each workĺÎĺĺÎĺs historical context and constitution; Discuss important artists in terms of the style of their work. (Art History 202)

Material Type: Assessment, Full Course, Homework/Assignment, Lecture, Reading, Syllabus, Textbook

The Italian Proto-Renaissance To Mannerism

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The student will focus on becoming literate in the art of the Italian Renaissance, on identifying the effects that the Renaissance had on the arts of Italy, and discovering the ways in which specific historical developments impacted those arts from the end of the thirteenth century to the end of the sixteenth century. The Renaissance, a European phenomenon that began to develop in the late thirteenth century, refers to a marked shift in the ways in which individuals perceived their world. A new outlook was emerging that was characterized by, among other things, increased humanism and a renewed interest in the cultures of Classical Antiquity (and all within a Christian framework). There is no specific date that marks the beginning of the Renaissance, but its burgeoning effects on art can be detected earlier in Italy than in other areas. Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to: Define the term Renaissance and identify its modes of expression in the art of Italy; Place the major artistic developments of Italian Renaissance art along a timeline and characterize the art of different periods within the Renaissance; Situate different artists, artworks, and artistic practices within their respective regions or cities; Explain how specific historical contexts, events, and figures affected Italian Renaissance art; Describe specificities in interests and style as they apply to the work of important artists of the Renaissance; Recognize important artworks and describe them in terms of their form, content, and general history of their creation; Explain the role of art and artists during the Renaissance in Italy; Discuss specific artistic techniques used during the Renaissance in Italy. (Art History 206)

Material Type: Assessment, Full Course, Lecture, Reading, Syllabus

Baroque Art to Neoclassicism

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This course will examine the history of Western art from approximately 1600 to approximately 1800 period that bridges the gap from the Renaissance to the earliest days of the Modern era. Beginning with the Baroque in Counter-Reformation Italy and concluding with Neoclassicism in the late 18th century, the student will trace the stylistic developments in Europe and America through a variety of religious, political, and philosophical movements. Upon completion of this course, students will be able to: Identify works of art from the Baroque, Rococo, Enlightenment, and Neoclassical periods and be able to distinguish between these different periods; Discuss and identify the oeuvre of the major artists working in Western Europe from 1600-1800; Explain and identify the regional and cultural differences between works of art produced in the same period (i.e., Baroque, Rococo, Enlightenment, or Neoclassical); Recognize important works of art from the Baroque through Neoclassical periods, recalling such information as date of creation, artist, patron (if known), medium, and period; Recognize the features (stylistic and iconographic) typical of each period studied; Explain and discuss the general arc of Western history from approximately 1600-1800, as seen through the lens of the arts; Explain the forces influencing the change in style and subject matter in Western art from 1600-1800; Discuss the sources of influence (from previous historical periods as well as from neighboring geographical regions) that affected art produced from the Baroque to Neoclassical periods; Compare and contrast works of art from the Baroque through Neoclassical periods to those of other periods and cultures; Describe the methods and materials used to create works of art from the Baroque to Neoclassical periods; Explain the ways in which Baroque, Rococo, Enlightenment, and Neoclassical art reveal the social, religious, and political mores of their respective times and places. (Art History 207)

Material Type: Assessment, Full Course, Homework/Assignment, Lecture, Reading, Syllabus

American Art

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This course surveys art of America from the colonial era through the post-war 20th century. The student will consider broad stylistic tendencies in various regions and periods and examine specific artists and works of art in historical and social contexts, with emphasis on the congruent evolution of contemporary American multi-cultural identity. Overarching issues that have interested major scholars of American art and its purview include the landscape (wilderness, Manifest Destiny, rural settlement, and urban development); the family and gender roles; the founding rhetoric of freedom and antebellum slavery; and notions of artistic modernism through the 20th century. Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to: Understand the historical (geographic, political) formation of the present United States of America; Be familiar with renowned influential American artists from the 18th through the 20th century; Be conversant in common stylistic designations used in Western art of the 17th through 20th centuries; Recognize subjects and forms in American art through history that mark its distinction; Be able to engage specific images, objects, and structures from different critical perspectives to consider their functions and meanings. (Art History 210)

Material Type: Assessment, Full Course, Homework/Assignment, Lecture, Reading, Syllabus

Art of the Islamic World

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This course serves as an introduction to the pre-modern Islamic artistic traditions of the Mediterranean, Near East, and Central and South Asia. It surveys core Islamic beliefs, the basic characteristics of Islamic art and architecture, and art and architecture created under each dynasty and ruling party. Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to: identify the core beliefs of Islam, the major characteristics of Islamic art, and the major forms of Islamic architecture; identify major pre-modern Islamic works of art and monuments from the Middle East, Northern Africa, Spain, and South Asia; explain how the core beliefs of Islam contributed to the basic characteristics of Islamic art and architecture and the secular art works and architecture of the Islamic world; identify the succeeding dynasties that ruled the Islamic world; explain the important role that the patronage of art and architecture had played in definitions of kingship. (Art History 303)

Material Type: Assessment, Full Course, Homework/Assignment, Lecture, Lecture Notes, Reading, Syllabus

Art History

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The history of Art is long and varied, spanning tens of thousands of years from ancient paintings on the walls of caves to the glow of computer-generated images on the screens of the 21st century.

Material Type: Textbook

Biology

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Biology is designed for multi-semester biology courses for science majors. It is grounded on an evolutionary basis and includes exciting features that highlight careers in the biological sciences and everyday applications of the concepts at hand. To meet the needs of today’s instructors and students, some content has been strategically condensed while maintaining the overall scope and coverage of traditional texts for this course. Instructors can customize the book, adapting it to the approach that works best in their classroom. Biology also includes an innovative art program that incorporates critical thinking and clicker questions to help students understand—and apply—key concepts.

Material Type: Full Course