Digital Academy Instructors

To source quality content for integration into Digital Academy's Canvas platform for creation of engaging and interactive courses that is fully responsive, compatible with the range of digital devices, providing enrolled users with industry-relevant, affordable solutions.
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All resources in Digital Academy Instructors

Cultural Intelligence

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GEOG 571 explores the relationships between culture and civil security and the process of geographically analyzing social, political, economic, and demographic information to understand human history, institutions, and behaviors. It is an elective course in the Geospatial Intelligence Certificate, the Intercollege Master of Professional Studies (iMPS-HLS), and the Master of Geographic Information Systems degree program that is offered exclusively through Penn State's World Campus. It is also one of the optional capstone courses that leads to Penn State's Postbaccalaureate Certificate in GIS. The course consists of projects, associated readings, and exams.

Material Type: Full Course

Author: George Van Otten

Energy and Sustainability in Society

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Experiential learning, yes! But...online? at a distance? independent undergraduate research? This capstone course in Energy and Sustainability Policy is a novel approach to exactly this. Each student follows the same overarching structure: a four-part written research report, weekly journals, group discussions, a LinkedIn presence, an in-person presentation and a video submission. Along the way, the student has numerous personal interactions with real world stakeholders and gives an in-person presentation to an interested local audience. Proven over many semesters now, this engaged scholarship model serves senior students well, guiding and building confidence and professional opportunities.

Material Type: Full Course

Authors: Brandi Robinson, Vera Cole

GPS and GNSS

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Today GPS is critical to positioning, navigation, and timing. The smooth functioning of financial transactions, air traffic, ATMs, cell phones and modern life in general around the world depend on GPS. This very criticality requires continuous modernization. The oldest satellites in the current constellation were launched in the 1990s. If you imagine using a computer of that vintage today, it is not surprising that the system is being substantially updated. Global Positioning System (GPS) is now a part of a growing international con?text-the Global Navigation Satellite System, GNSS. This course dives into how GPS and other GNSS systems are designed, how they operate, and the impacts they have on spatial analysis and spatially-enabled systems.

Material Type: Full Course

Author: Jan Van Sickle

Physics 250 Laboratory: Conservation of Energy

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This is a lab activity involving transformations between the gravitational potential energy, elastic potential energy, and kinetic energy of a system. An air track with a glider and a photo gate timer are needed to perform the lab. The lab is divided into three separate but related parts. The first part involves using a spring to launch the glider horizontally, measuring the velocity of the glider, and then relating elastic potential energy to kinetic energy. The second activity involves adjusting the air track so that when the glider is launched, it goes up an incline. This set up allows students to relate elastic potential energy to gravitational potential energy. The third and final activity ties elastic potential, gravitational, and kinetic energy together. Using the knowledge they acquired from the first two activities, the students need to use Conservation of Energy to predict the velocity of the glider as it is launched up the incline and then compare their prediction to the experimental value.

Material Type: Activity/Lab

Technical Project Management in Living and Geometric Order: A Practical Perspective

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Technical Project Management in Living and Geometric Order demonstrates that even the best-laid project plans can be undone by new technologies, financial upheavals, or resource scarcity, to name just a few disruptors. It encourages project managers to focus on learning throughout a project, with the understanding that what they learn could necessitate major changes in midstream. This adaptive, flexible, living-order approach is inspired by Lean in construction projects and Agile in software development. Technical Project Management in Living and Geometric Order explains how today’s projects unfold in dynamic environments in response to unexpected events. With its practical tips, detailed graphics, links to additional resources, and interviews with engineering professionals, it’s an accessible introduction to the living order for aspiring project managers.

Material Type: Full Course

Authors: Jeffrey Russell, John Nelson, Wayne Pferdehirt

Career/Life Planning and Personal Exploration

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Counseling 116: Career/Life Planning and Personal Exploration is designed to cover theories and concepts of values, interests, skills and personality as applied to the career/life planning process and its application to labor market trends. Short/long term career/life plans will be developed. Students will develop an awareness of diversity and its relationship to psychological, sociological and physiological forces within the workplace.

Material Type: Full Course

Authors: Joanna Campos-Robledo, Thu Nguyen

Remix

Database

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Database Security is the utmost key part for any type of database, .for example financial information, personal information, employee information and enterprise information. This book will cover following topics such as creating and altering database user, password profiling, various privileges and virtual private database. All the topics are implemented by using oracle 11g software. Especially for readers this book will give clarity about database security concepts such as Authorization, Authentication and Access control. The practical part using oracle provides how to carry out database security concepts technically for the reader.

Material Type: Full Course

Author: Mumtaj Yasmin

Introduction to Open Access

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Progress of every profession, academic discipline and society at large rides on the back of research and development. Research generates new information and knowledge. It is a standardized process of identifying problem, collecting data or evidence, tabulating data and its analysis, drawing inference and establishing new facts in the form of information. Information has its life cycle: conception, generation, communication, evaluation and validation, use, impact and lastly a fuel for new ideas. Research results are published in journals, conference proceedings, monographs, dissertations, reports, and now the web provides many a new forum for its communication. Since their origin in the 17th century, the journals have remained very popular and important channels for dissemination of new ideas and research. Journals have become inseparable organ of scholarship and research communication, and are a huge and wide industry. Their proliferation (with high mortality rate), high cost of production, cumbersome distribution, waiting time for authors to get published, and then more time in getting listed in indexing services, increasing subscription rates, and lastly archiving of back volumes have led to a serious problem known as "Serials Crisis". The ICT, especially the internet and the WWW, descended from the cyber space to solve all these problems over night in the new avatar of e-journals. Their inherent features and versatility have made them immensely popular. Then in the beginning of the 21st century emerged the Open Access (OA) movement with the Budapest Open Access Initiative (BOAI). Philosophy of open access is to provide free of charge and unhindered access to research and its publications without copyright restrictions. The movement got support from great scientists, educationists, publishers, research institutions, professional associations and library organizations. The other OA declarations at Berlin and Bethesda put it on strong footings. Its philosophy is: research funded by tax payers should be available free of charge to tax payers. Research being a public good should be available to all irrespective of their paying capacity. The OA has many forms of access and usage varying from total freedom from paying any charges, full permission to copy, download, print, distribute, archive, translate and even change format to its usage with varying restrictions. In the beginning, OA publications were doubted for their authenticity and quality: established authors and researchers shied away both from contributing to and citing from OA literature. But Committee on Publication Ethics (COPE, 1997) and its code of conduct formulated in collaboration with DOAJ and OASPA, etc. have stemmed the rot. They have defined best practices and compiled principles of transparency for quality control to sift the grain from the chaff; to keep the fraudulent at bay. Now it is accepted that contributors to OA get increased visibility, global presence, increased accessibility, increased collaboration, increased impact both in citations and applications, and lastly instant feedback, comments and critical reflections. This movement has got roots due to its systematic advocacy campaign. Since 2008 every year 21-27 October is celebrated as the OA week throughout the world. There are many organizations which advocate OA through social media and provide guidance for others. Open Access research literature has not only made new ideas easy and quick to disseminate, but the impact of research can be quantitatively gauged by various bibliometric, scientometric and webometric methods such as h-index, i-10 index, etc. to measure the scientific productivity, its flow, speed and lastly its concrete influence on individuals, and on the progress of a discipline. The OA movement is gaining momentum every day, thanks to technology, organizational efforts for quality control and its measureable impact on productivity and further research. It needs to be strengthened with participation of every researcher, scientist, educationist and librarian. This module covers five units, covering these issues. At the end of this module, you are expected to be able to: - Define scholarly communication and open access, and promote and differentiate between the various forms of Open Access; - Explain issues related to rights management, incl. copyright, copy-left, authors’ rights and related intellectual property rights; - Demonstrate the impact of Open Access within a scholarly communication environment. This is Module One of the UNESCO's Open Access Curriculum for Library Schools. Full-Text is available at http://unesdoc.unesco.org/images/0023/002319/231920E.pdf.

Material Type: Full Course, Module, Textbook, Unit of Study

Authors: Anup Kumar Das, Uma Kanjilal

Sharing Your Work in Open Access

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This is the last Module of the course on Open Access for researchers. So far you have studied about Open Access, its history, advantages, initiatives, copyrights and licensing, evaluation matrix for research – all in the context of scholarly communication. In this Module with just two units, we would like to help you share your work in Open Access though repositories and journals. At the end of this module, you are expected to be able to: - Understand the publication process involved in dissemination of scholarly works; - Choose appropriate Open Access journals and repositories for sharing research results; - Use social media to promote personal research work and build reputation. In Unit 1, we discuss the research publication process at five stages – planning stage, preparing stage, pre-publication stage, publication stage and postpublication stage. We emphasize the importance of social media in sharing and making your work visible to the target groups. In Unit 2, we focus on sharing your research through OA repositories and Journals. First we discussed the different types of repositories to select and highlighted the steps that you may consider including deposit in your own institutional repositories or in global open repositories. We then discuss the sources of finding and deciding on OA journals. This unit also provides guidance on choosing the right OA journals, as the quality of OA journals is often questioned. This is Module Five of the UNESCO's Open Access Curriculum for Researchers. Full-Text is available at http://unesdoc.unesco.org/images/0023/002322/232211E.pdf

Material Type: Full Course, Module, Textbook, Unit of Study

Authors: Anup Kumar Das, Sanjaya Mishra

Research Evaluation Metrics

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This module dwells on a number of methods (including old and new) available for research evaluation. The module comprises the following four units: Unit 1. Introduction to Research Evaluation Metrics and Related Indicators. Unit 2. Innovations in Measuring Science and Scholarship: Analytical Tools and Indicators in Evaluation Scholarship Communications. Unit 3. Article and Author Level Measurements, and Unit 4. Online Citation and Reference Management Tools. Brief overviews of the units are presented below. Unit 1 encompassed and discussed citation analysis, use of citation-based indicators for research evaluation, common bibliometric indicators, classical bibliometric laws, author level indicators using authors' public profiles, article level metrics using altmetric tools. It is to be noted that author level indicators and article level metrics are new tools for research evaluation. Author level indicators encompasses h index, citations count, i10 index, g index, articles with citation, average citations per article, Eigenfactor score, impact points, and RG score. Article level metrics or altmetrics are based on Twitter, Facebook, Mendeley, CiteULike, and Delicious which have been discussed. All technical terms used in the Unit have been defined. Unit 2 deals with analytical tools and indicators used in evaluating scholarly communications. The tools covered are The Web of Science, Scopus, Indian Citation Index (ICI), CiteSeerX, Google Scholar and Google Scholar Citations. Among these all the tools except Indian Citation Index (ICI) are international in scope. ICI is not very much known outside India. It is a powerful tool as far Indian scholarly literature is concerned. As Indian journals publish a sizable amount of foreign literature, the tool will be useful for foreign countries as well. The analytical products with journal performance metrics Journal Citation Reports (JCR®) has also been described. In the chapter titled New Platforms for Evaluating Scholarly Communications three websites i.e. SCImago Journal & Country Rank (SJR) [ScimagoJR.com], eigenFACTOR.org, JournalMetrics.com and one software called Publish or Perish (POP) Software have been discussed. Article and author level measurements have been discussed in Unit 3. Author and researcher identifiers are absolutely essential for searching databases in the WWW because a name like D Singh can harbour a number of names such as Dan Singh, Dhan Singh, Dhyan Singh, Darbara Singh, Daulat Singh, Durlabh Singh and more. The ResearcherID.com, launched by Thomson Reuters, is a web-based global registry of authors and researchers that individualises each and every name. Open Researcher and Contributor ID (ORCID) is also a registry that uniquely identifies an author or researcher. Both have been discussed in this Unit. Article Level Metrics (Altmetrics) has been treated in this Unit with the discussion as to how altmetrics can be measured with Altmetric.com and ImpactStory.org. Altmetrics for Online Journals has also been touched. There are a number of academic social networks of which ResearchGate.net, Academia.edu, GetCited.org, etc. have been discussed. Regional journal networks with bibliometric indicators are also in existence. Two networks of this type such as SciELO – Scientific Electronic Library Online, and Redalyc have been dealt with. The last unit (Unit 4) is on online citation and reference management tools. The tools discussed are Mendeley, CiteULike, Zotero, Google Scholar Library, and EndNote Basic. The features of all the management tools have been discussed with figures, tables, and text boxes. This is Module Four of the UNESCO's Open Access Curriculum for Researchers. Full-Text is available at http://unesdoc.unesco.org/images/0023/002322/232210E.pdf

Material Type: Full Course, Module, Textbook, Unit of Study

Author: Anup Kumar Das

Scholarly Communication

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Researchers, scholars and scientists main business is scholarly communication. We communicate about our work to others, as we push the boundaries of what we know and the society knows. We question established notions and truths about science. We share our findings with others, and in a way that is popularly known as scholarly communication which emerged with the publication of first journal in 1665. However, the term gained popularity only in the 1970s, as access to peer reviewed and scholarly communication became difficult. This module has four units covering introduction to scholarly communication, peer reviewed journals, electronica journals and databases and the Serials Crisis. At the end of this module, the learner is expected to be able to: - Explain philosophy, mission, and objectives of scholarly communication - Describe the process of scholarly communication - Identify different channels of scholarly communication - Discuss the dysfunctioning of the scholarly communication In Unit 1, Introduction to scholarly communication, we have discussed different aspects of scholarly communication – particularly its genesis, importance and ethics of academic publishing, and different communication channels available in academic publishing. Some of these channels are commonly described as primary sources as they provide first-hand testimony or direct evidence concerning a topic under investigation. Historically, scientific journals were initiated by learned societies and other scholarly communities for reporting results of concluded research works or scientific discoveries. Now many forprofit publishers have started publishing research journals. Unit 2, Communicating with Peer Review Journals, covers two important academic publishing channels, namely peer reviewed journals, conferences and their proceedings. This Unit also highlights different methods and procedures of peer reviewing for publishing primary literature emanated from research studies. The peer reviewing is essential for validating quality of research findings conveyed by researchers, which are subject to fulfilment of ethical standards and appropriate research design, sampling and other methodological issues. In Unit 3, Electronic journals and databases, we have discussed the emergence of electronic journals in academic and research environment due to wide proliferation of information and communication technologies (ICT) in research communications and academic publishing. Scientific communities and scientific communications from the global South are getting substantive attentions through adaptation of electronic journals and electronic academic databases in the process of research communications. In Unit 4, the Serials Crisis, we discuss the cost of peer reviewed publications and the problems faced by researchers in developing countries. The focus of this unit is on highlighting the problems and discusses possible solutions including the emergence of open access as one of the solutions. Open access journal publishing helps in mitigating some of the problems associated with serials crisis. This is Module One of the UNESCO's Open Access Curriculum for Researchers. Full-Text is available at http://unesdoc.unesco.org/images/0023/002319/231938e.pdf

Material Type: Full Course, Module, Textbook, Unit of Study

Author: Anup Kumar Das

Open Educational Resource (OER) presentations for a course on Operating Systems

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This page collects OER presentations (responsive HTML slides with embedded audio, also PDF versions) for a course on Operating Systems (following the book Operating Systems and Middleware: Supporting Controlled Interaction by Max Hailperin). Presentations can be viewed with modern browsers on any device (including mobile), also offline after download. Source files, necessary software, and presentations are published in this GitLab repository under free licenses.

Material Type: Full Course

Author: Jens Lechtenbörger

Topology in Condensed Matter

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The idea behind topological systems is simple: if there exists a quantity, which cannot change in an insulating system where all the particles are localized, then the system must become conducting and obtain propagating particles when the quantity (called a “topological invariant”) finally changes. The practical applications of this principle are quite profound, and already within the last eight years they have lead to prediction and discovery of a vast range of new materials with exotic properties that were considered to be impossible before. What is the focus of this course? Applications of topology in condensed matter based on bulk-edge correspondence. Special attention to the most active research topics in topological condensed matter: theory of topological insulators and Majorana fermions, topological classification of “grand ten” symmetry classes, and topological quantum computation Extensions of topology to further areas of condensed matter, such as photonic and mechanical systems, topological quantum walks, topology in fractionalized systems, driven or dissipative systems.

Material Type: Full Course

Author: Assistant Professor Anton Akhmerov

Leadership for Engineers

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Many of today’s global challenges require tech-driven solutions — climate change, the growth of the world population, cyber security, the increasing demand for scarce resources, digitalization, the transition from fossil fuels to renewable energy. With this in mind, it is no surprise that one fourth of the CEOs of the world’s 100 largest corporations have an engineering degree. Solving these global problems requires leaders who, in the first place, are comfortable with technology, models and quantitative analyses — Leaders who see systems instead of isolated problems. However, simply understanding technology is not enough. Successful leaders today must have both the ideas and the know-how to put these ideas into action by working collaboratively with others, winning their hearts and minds. We need leaders who know how to seize opportunities in a networked world, and can mobilize people and other stakeholders for large-scale change. Leaders who lead fulfilling lives and who are able to move themselves and others from the ‘me’ to the ‘we’. Leaders who are long-term oriented and who deliver economic profit, while also making positive contributions to society and the environment. We call these leaders ‘sustainable leaders’.

Material Type: Full Course

Author: Prof.mr.dr. J.A. de Bruijn

Introduction to Water and Climate

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Water is essential for life on earth and of crucial importance for society. Also within our climate water plays a major role. The natural cycle of ocean to atmosphere, by precipitation back to earth and by rivers and aquifers to the oceans has a decisive impact on regional and global climate patterns. This course will cover six main topics: Global water cycle. In this module you will learn to explain the different processes of the global water cycle. Water systems. In this module you will learn to describe the flows of water and sand in different riverine, coastal and ocean systems. Water and climate change. In this module you will learn to identify mechanisms of climate change and you will learn to explain the interplay of climate change, sea level, clouds, rainfall and future weather. Interventions. In this module you will learn to explain why, when and which engineering interventions are needed in rivers, coast and urban environment. Water resource management. In this module you will learn to explain why water for food and water for cities are the main challenges in water management and what the possibilities and limitations of reservoirs and groundwater are to improve water availability. Challenges. In this module you will learn to explain the challenges in better understanding and adapting to the impact of climate change on water for the coming 50 years.

Material Type: Full Course

Authors: Prof.dr.ir. Herman Russchenberg, Prof.dr.ir. Hubert Savenije, Prof.dr.ir. Marcel Stive, Prof.dr. Nick van de Giesen

Information Literacy II

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This instruction follows on from the online instruction Information Literacy 1, in which you learned how to find, evaluate and use information. Today’s instruction is intended for advanced users.

Material Type: Full Course