Author:
Alyssa King, MSDE Admin, Tracy Cramer
Subject:
Information Science, Electronic Technology
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Level:
High School
Grade:
9, 10, 11, 12
Tags:
Digital Citizenship, Library, Library Media, MSDE, MSDE Library, Online Safety, Privacy, Security
License:
Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 United States
Language:
English
Media Formats:
Downloadable docs, Text/HTML, Video

Education Standards (1)

Privacy and Security for Teens

Privacy and Security for Teens

Overview

How safe are your students online? 

This lesson includes resources with facts and tips about online privacy and security for students. Students will 1.) evaluate resources for best practices in cyber privacy and security and 2.) identify a goal to strengthen an area of cyber privacy and security in their online behavior. 

(Thumbnail image attribute: Alpha Stock Images http://alphastockimages.com/)

Introduction - Online Age Requirement Poll

Ask students What do you think should be the minimum age for a person to use social media like Snapchat or Instagram? 

Consider using a formative assessment web tool such as Poll Everywhere or Mentimeter in order to visually display student results.

What do you think should be the minumum age for a person to use social media like Snapchat or Instagram? 

Cyber Law and Best Consumer Practices

Transition: After the introduction, share the COPPA and CIPA explained PowerPoint slides (download from this lesson Resource Library) and compare student responses from the introduction to the laws. Clarify or ask questions as needed.

The purpose of this task is to allow students to examine vetted resources related to consumer privacy and security. Provide students time to explore the following resources (detailed in Student Content). Consider grouping students.

Heads up: Stop. Think. Connect (FTC.gov)

Stay Safe Online: Privacy Tips for Teens (National Cyber Security Alliance)

OnGuardOnline (FTC.gov)

For assessment of this task, consider asking students to create a product that will reflect their evaluation of the privacy and security resources. Ideas include:

  • A top ten list for teens that includes a rationale for the selections made
  • A poster or infographic that highlights most important facts and tips
  • A PSA (public service announcement) that can be audio or video

What should teens know about cybersecurity? How can teens keep their personal computers or mobile devices secure? How can they keep their private information safe and secure?

Heads up: Stop. Think. Connect (FTC.gov)

This downloadable PDF brochure provides tips on protecting yourself online. Topics include social media, cyberbullying, privacy, and security. 

Stay Safe Online: Privacy Tips for Teens (National Cyber Security Alliance)

StaySafeOnline is a website powered by the National Cyber Security Alliance to promote online safety. Attention is given to both a personal aspect of online security as well as the social implications. There is a section on privacy tips for teens that includes a downloadable PDF summary. 

OnGuardOnline (FTC.gov)

OnGuardOnline is a website published by the Federal Trade Commission to provide tips and online safety information to consumers.  Topics include cybercrime, phishing scams, computer security, and public wi-fi safety. Be sure to check out the videos and games.  

Create a product that will reflect your evaluation of the privacy and security resources you investigated based on your teacher's directive.

How will YOU protect your cyber-self?

In this task, students will shift to a more personal reflection about cyber privacy and security to initiate a personal change in online behavior. 

Consider using these additional resources, which will provide students information about the personal mobile device they might use, or the social media presence they might have:

How to Manage Privacy Settings on [Popular] Apps

Apple Inc. Privacy

Google Safety Center: Explore Safety Tools

For assessment of this task, consider asking students to create a product that will reflect applicable privacy and security settings, along with behaviors that accompany use of social media and/or online presence. Ideas include:

  • Personal reflection through journaling
  • Discussion that might follow a socratic seminar or fishbowl strategy
  • Students can demonstrate or assist another student or family member in strengthening personal privacy settings--this can be documented in a journal, podcast, vlog, etc.

What changes can you make in the way you use technology? Consider how you use a personal computer or mobile device. What settings might need to be changed? What personal habits might you try to change and why?

Select one or more of the tips that you find relevant to your cyber privacy and security. Set a personal goal that will help you implement a particular strategy into your daily life--this might mean changing an online habit.

How to Manage Privacy Settings on [Popular] Apps

This blog post (2017) shares information about privacy settings for common social media platforms including Facebook, Messenger, Twitter, WhatsApp, Snapchat, and Instagram. Since this information may change, visit the official policies of the social media sites to get the latest privacy and security tips.  

Apple Inc. Privacy

Apple’s Privacy website provides users with privacy and security tips for all Apple products. Users can select from a variety of topics. Many topics include step by step instructions.  

Google Safety Center: Explore Safety Tools

Safety Tools is a website published by Google to provide users with privacy and security tips and assistance for Google products, which include Android devices. Users can select from a variety of topics for step by step instructions.  

Initiate a change in personal online behavior and share your reflections based on your teacher's directive.