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5 To One Ha
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Another show of Northern optimism in the early months of the Lincoln administration. Uncle Sam approaches from the left holding a bayonet, causing five Southern soldiers to flee in panic to the right. In their haste to retreat the Confederates drop their flag, muskets, a hat, and a boot. A black child and two black men, one fiddling, watch with obvious glee from the background. Prominent in the center foreground are a mound marked "76" bearing an American flag and a crowing cock. In the background are the Capitol at Washington (left) and the palmetto trees of South Carolina (right).|Entered . . . by W. Wiswell . . . Ohio, June 8th 1861.|The Library's copy of the print is the copyright deposit impression.|Title appears as it is written on the item.|Weitenkampf, p. 132.|Forms part of: American cartoon print filing series (Library of Congress)|Published in: American political prints, 1766-1876 / Bernard F. Reilly. Boston : G.K. Hall, 1991, entry 1861-28.

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U.S. History
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Library of Congress - Cartoons 1766-1876
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06/08/2013
6 Cents. Humbug Glory Bank
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Another mock bank note parodying the "shinplasters" of the 1837 panic. Such small-denomination notes were based on the division of the Spanish dollar, the dominant specie of the time. Hence they were issued in sums of 6 (more accurately 6 1/4), 25, 50, and 75 cents. These fractional notes proliferated during the Panic of 1837 with the emergency suspension of specie (i.e., money in coin) payments by New York banks on May 10 of that year. "Treasury Note" and "Fifty Cents Shin Plaster" (nos. 1837-9 and -11) also use the bank note format to comment on the dismal state of American finances. Unlike these, however, "Humbug Glory Bank" is actually the same size as a real note. The note is payable to "Tumble Bug Benton," Missouri senator and hard-money advocate Thomas Hart Benton, and is signed by "Cunning Reuben [Whitney, anti-Bank adviser to Jackson and Van Buren] Cash'r" and "Honest Amos [Kendall, Postmaster General and influential advisor to Van Buren] Pres't." It shows several coins with the head of Andrew Jackson at left, a jackass with the title "Roman Firmness," a hickory leaf (alluding to Jackson's nickname "Old Hickory"), and a vignette showing Jackson's hat, clay pipe, spectacles, hickory stick, and veto (of the 1832 bill to recharter the Bank of the United States) in a blaze of light. Above is a quote from Jackson's March 1837 farewell address to the American people, "I leave this great people prosperous and happy."|Copyrighted by Anthony Fleetwood, 1837.|Published at 89 Nassau Str. New York.|Signed facetiously: Martin Van Buren Sc.|The print was deposited for copyright on August 21, 1837, by Anthony Fleetwood, and published at the same address (89 Nassau Street) as "Capitol Fashions" (no. 1837-1), also an etching. The Library's impression (the copyright deposit proof) is printed on extremely thin tissue.|Title appears as it is written on the item.|Forms part of: American cartoon print filing series (Library of Congress)|Published in: American political prints, 1766-1876 / Bernard F. Reilly. Boston : G.K. Hall, 1991, entry 1837-10.

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06/13/2013
Abe Linking With His Significantly Named Cabinet
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Entered according to Act of Congress in the year 1864 by M.E. Goodwin in the Clerk's Off. in the Dist. Court of the United States for the Southern Dist. of N.Y. Designed by R.D. Goodwin.|Title appears as it is written on the item.|Forms part of: American cartoon print filing series (Library of Congress)

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06/08/2013
Abolition Frowned Down
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A satire on enforcement of the "gag-rule" in the House of Representatives, prohibiting discussion of the question of slavery. Growing antislavery sentiment in the North coincided with increased resentment by southern congressmen of such discussion as meddlesome and insulting to their constituencies. The print may relate to John Quincy Adams's opposition to passage of the resolution in 1838, or (more likely) to his continued frustration in attempting to force the slavery issue through presentation of northern constituents' petitions in 1839. In December 1839 a new "gag rule" was passed by the House forbidding debate, reading, printing of, or even reference to any petition on the subject of abolition. Here Adams cowers prostrate on a pile composed of petitions, a copy of the abolitionist newspaper the "Emancipator," and a resolution to recognize Haiti. He says "I cannot stand Thomson's [sic] frown." South Carolina representative Waddy Thompson, Jr., a Whig defender of slavery, glowers at him from behind a sack and two casks, saying "Sir the South loses caste whenever she suffers this subject to be discussed here; it must be indignantly frowned down." Two blacks crouch behind Thompson, one saying "de dem Bobolishn is down flat!" Weitenkampf cites an impression with an imprint naming Robinson as printer and publisher, this line being apparently trimmed from the Library's impression. The drawing style and handling of the figures strongly suggest that "Abolition Frowned Down" is by the same Robinson artist as the anonymous "Called to Account" and "Symptoms of a Duel" (nos. 1839-10 and -11).|Drawn by HD?|Entd . . . 1839 by H.R. Robinson . . . Southn. Dist. of N.Y.|Title appears as it is written on the item.|Weitenkampf, p. 59.|Forms part of: American cartoon print filing series (Library of Congress)|Published in: American political prints, 1766-1876 / Bernard F. Reilly. Boston : G.K. Hall, 1991, entry 1839-12.

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06/08/2013
The Adventures of General Beauregard and His Charger--In Four Parts
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A folding comic puzzle in which the heads of Confederate General P.G.T. Beauregard and a donkey switch bodies. An example of mass of anti-Beauregard material published in the north after the outbreak of hostilities leading to Civil War.|Published by Samuel Upham, 310 Chestnut Street, Philadelphia. Entered according to Act of Congress, in the year 1861, by Samuel C. Upham, 310 Chestnut St., Philadelphia, in the Clerk's Office of the District Court of the United States, in and of the Eastern District of Pennsylvania.|Title appears as it is written on the item.|Forms part of: American cartoon print filing series (Library of Congress)

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U.S. History
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06/13/2013
An Affecting Scene In Kentucky
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A racist attack on Democratic vice-presidential candidate Richard M. Johnson. The Kentucky Congressman's nomination, in May 1835, as Van Buren's running-mate for the 1836 election raised eyebrows even among party faithful, because of Johnson's common-law marriage to a mulatto woman, Julia Chinn, by whom he fathered two daughters. The artist ridicules Johnson's domestic situation, and the Democrats' constituency as well. Seated in a chair with his hand over his face, a visibly distraught Johnson lets a copy of James Watson Webb's "New York Courier and Enquirer" fall to the floor and moans, "When I read the scurrilous attacks in the Newspapers on the Mother of my Children, pardon me, my friends if I give way to feelings!!! My dear Girls, bring me your Mother's picture, that I may show it to my friends here." On the right are his two daughters, Adaline and Imogene, wearing elegant evening dresses. One presents a painting of a black woman wearing a turban, and says, "Here it is Pa, but don't take on so." The second daughter says, "Poor dear Pa, how much he is affected." A man behind them exclaims, "Pickle! Pop!! and Ginger!!! Can the slayer of Tecumseh be thus overcome like a summer cloud! fire and furies. oh!" Johnson is reported to have slain the Indian chief Tecumseh. Flanking Johnson are a gaunt abolitionist (right) and a black man. The abolitionist holds a copy of the "Emancipator," a Hartford, Connecticut newspaper, and says, "Be comforted Richard; all of us abolitionists will support thee." The black man pledges, ". . . de honor of a Gentlemen dat all de Gentlemen of Colour will support you." On the far left is a stout postmaster who says, "Your Excellency, I am sure all of us Postmasters and deputies will stick to you; if you promise to keep us in office." The print seems to date from early in the campaign of 1836. Johnson's wife Julia Chinn died in 1833. Adaline, one of the two daughters pictured, died in February 1836. Although Weitenkampf dates the print at 1840, when Johnson was again Van Buren's running-mate, the presence of both daughters and the drawing style are persuasive evidence for an 1836 date.|Probably published by Henry R. Robinson, New York.|Title appears as it is written on the item.|Weitenkampf, p. 63.|Forms part of: American cartoon print filing series (Library of Congress)|Published in: American political prints, 1766-1876 / Bernard F. Reilly. Boston : G.K. Hall, 1991, entry 1836-15.

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U.S. History
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Library of Congress - Cartoons 1766-1876
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06/13/2013
After A Little While
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A pro-Republican campaign print casting Lincoln as peacemaker, and as the hope for reconciliation between the North and South. The top half of the composition represents the North and the bottom the South. In the center, Lincoln rides forth on a prancing horse, as a group of farmers at the left wave their hats and cheer, "All is right now! hurrah!" Below him is a streamer "Union Henceforth Now and For Ever." On the right the upper scene, in the North, shows a "Northern Fanatic" in a jail "Imprisonment for Life." Above the jail is a gallows, "Higher Law." The prisoner is jeered by a crowd, saying, "That serves them [him?] right." The bottom right scene in the South shows a "Southern Fanatic" jailed while several onlookers say, "They won't do any more mischief." In the center, to the left, a weary Jefferson Davis begins to dismount from his horse. Below him are two clasped hands, with the title "After a Little While."|Lith. by Chas. Magnus, N.Y.|Title appears as it is written on the item.|Published in: American political prints, 1766-1876 / Bernard F. Reilly. Boston : G.K. Hall, 1991, entry 1864-29.

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06/13/2013
All Fours-Important State of The Game-The Knave About To Be Lost
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The presidential campaign of 1836 viewed as a card game by a satirist in sympathy with the Whigs. Opposing candidates Martin Van Buren (Democrat) and William Henry Harrison (Whig) face each other across a card table. Behind Van Buren stands his vice-presidential running mate Richard M. Johnson. Behind Harrison is incumbent President Andrew Jackson, who smokes a clay pipe and stands on tip-toes to spy on Harrison's hand. With his left hand he signals to Van Buren. Jackson: "What a h---ll of a hand old Harrison's got. I'm afraid Martin and Dick Johnson will go off with a flea in their ear." Johnson: "The old general is making signs that Harrison has the two highest trump cards and low. Martin he'll catch your Jack and then the jig's up! You'd better beg." Van Buren: "I ask one." Harrison: "Take it! now look out for your Jack!" On the wall above the table is a painting of the Battle of the Thames, one of Harrison's celebrated military victories a well as the occasion on which Johnson is reported to have slain the Indian chief Tecumseh. The print is probably by Robinson draughtsman Edward W. Clay, judging from its similarity to his "Grand Match Between the Kinderhook Poney ..." (no. 1836-14) and other signed work of the period.|Entered . . . 1836 by H.R. Robinson.|Published May 1836 by the proprietor H.R. Robinson, 48 Cortlandt St. N. York.|Title appears as it is written on the item.|Weitenkampf, p. 44.|Forms part of: American cartoon print filing series (Library of Congress)|Published in: American political prints, 1766-1876 / Bernard F. Reilly. Boston : G.K. Hall, 1991, entry 1836-11.

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U.S. History
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06/08/2013
All On Hobbies, Gee Up, Gee Ho!
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The major figures in American national politics in 1838 are gently satirized, each characterized as riding a favorite issue or "hobbyhorse." At the lead (far left) is President Martin Van Buren, riding a horse "Sub-Treasury," which he calls his "Old Hickory nag." The artist refers to Van Buren's independent treasury program, a system whereby federal funds were to be administered by revenue-collecting agencies or local "sub-treasuries" rather than by a national bank. The Independent Treasury Bill was perceived as an outgrowth of predecessor Jackson's anti-Bank program. Another hobbyhorse, "United States Bank" (center), is shared by Whig senators Henry Clay and Daniel Webster, leaders of congressional opposition to Jackson and Van Buren's respective fiscal agendas. Clay says, "Either you or I must get off Dan, for this horse wont carry double!" Webster responds, "Dash my Whig if I get off Hal!" Directly behind Van Buren Democratic Senator Thomas Hart Benton rides a horse "Specie Currency," an allusion to Benton's championing of hard money economics. Benton was identified with administration efforts to curb the use of currency in favor of "specie" or coin, and to increase the ratio of gold to silver in circulation. He says, "My Golden Poney carries more weight than any of them!" Behind Clay and Webster is South Carolina senator John C. Calhoun, advocate of state's rights and the driver of Southern nullification of the "Tariff of Abominations." On the right are William Henry Harrison, in military uniform and riding an "Anti-Masonic" hobby, and Massachusetts Congressman John Quincy Adams on his "Abolition" mount. Harrison's horse is named after the party which supported his 1836 bid for the Presidency. When he says, ". . . unless there is another Morgan abduction, I'm afraid he'll [the horse] lose his wind!" he alludes to the suspicious 1826 death of William Morgan (purportedly at the hands of Masons) which fueled considerable anti-Masonic sentiment in the United States. Adams laments, "This horse, instead of being my Topaz, is my Ebony." |Entd . . . 1838 by H.R. Robinson.|Printed & publd. by H.R. Robinson, 52 Cortlandt St. N.Y.|Signed with monogram: C (Edward Williams Clay).|The print was registered for copyright on March 16, 1838.|Title appears as it is written on the item.|Blaisdell and Selz, no. 16.|Davison, no. 104.|Weitenkampf, p. 53.|Forms part of: American cartoon print filing series (Library of Congress)|Published in: American political prints, 1766-1876 / Bernard F. Reilly. Boston : G.K. Hall, 1991, entry 1838-1.

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U.S. History
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Library of Congress - Cartoons 1766-1876
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06/08/2013
All The West Going For Matty
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A Whig cartoon spoofing Democratic claims of Western support for Van Buren during the election of 1840. Pursued by animals from the "Alleghany Mountains" and the Mississippi River, including among others a buffalo, alligator, beaver, turtle, and fox, Van Buren flees to the right saying, "This is going for me with a vengeance! I wish I was safe at Kinderhook! [his birthplace and family home was Kinderhook, New York] for I am a used up man!" A parchment "Sub-Treasury Bill" has fallen at his feet, referring to the independent treasury plan, the centerpiece of Van Buren's fiscal program.|Entered . . . 1840 by J. Childs.|Published by John Childs, 90 Nassau St. N.Y.|Signed with monogram: EWC (Edward Williams Clay).|Title appears as it is written on the item.|Weitenkampf, p. 61.|Forms part of: American cartoon print filing series (Library of Congress)|Published in: American political prints, 1766-1876 / Bernard F. Reilly. Boston : G.K. Hall, 1991, entry 1840-53.

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U.S. History
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06/08/2013
The Almighty Lever
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E. W. Clay's apocalyptic allegory has public opinion as a giant lever, tilting decisively in favor of the Whigs late in the presidential campaign of 1840. In a symbolic landscape masses of people climb onto the lever, which then nudges the great ball of "Loco Focoism" over a precipice. In the sky appears an eagle with a shield, arrows, and olive branches, holding a banner with the commentary: "With a log cabin and barrel of hard Cider for a fulcrum, public opinion for a "lever," with old Tip on the tip end the ball of Locofocoism will be rolled into oblivion and a gallant soldier raised to the white house. March 4th 1841." In the distance is a recently cleared field, the White House, and the Capitol. Van Buren and several others topple from the giant ball, on which also appears a strong box inscribed "Sub Treasury." A crowd of erstwhile supporters flee from the edge of the chasm, leaving behind "Treasury Notes." The print probably appeared in September 1840, since the Library's impression was deposited for copyright on September 24. Nancy Davison and Frank Weitenkampf both attribute the print to Edward W. Clay. This is supported by stylistic comparison with his other 1840 cartoons. The "W.C." signature appears to be a truncated form of his "EWC" monogram.|Entered . . . 1840 by J. Childs.|Published by John Childs, 90 Nassau Street New York.|Signed: W.C. inv. (Edward Williams Clay).|Title appears as it is written on the item.|Davison, no. 133.|Lorant, p. 158-159.|Weitenkampf, p. 66.|Forms part of: American cartoon print filing series (Library of Congress)|Published in: American political prints, 1766-1876 / Bernard F. Reilly. Boston : G.K. Hall, 1991, entry 1840-58.

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U.S. History
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06/08/2013
Am I Not A Man and A Brother?
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The large, bold woodcut image of a supplicant male slave in chains appears on the 1837 broadside publication of John Greenleaf Whittier's antislavery poem, "Our Countrymen in Chains." The design was originally adopted as the seal of the Society for the Abolition of Slavery in England in the 1780s, and appeared on several medallions for the society made by Josiah Wedgwood as early as 1787. Here, in addition to Whittier's poem, the appeal to conscience against slavery continues with two further quotes. The first is the scriptural warning, "He that stealeth a man and selleth him, or if he be found in his hand, he shall surely be put to death. "Exod[us] XXI, 16." Next the claim, "England has 800,000 Slaves, and she has made them free. America has 2,250,000! and she holds them fast!!!!" The broadside is advertised at "Price Two Cents Single; or $1.00 per hundred.|N.Y. sold at the Anti-Slavery Office, 144 Nassau St. 1837.|Title appears as it is written on the item.|Wedgwood Portraits and the American Revolution, p. 116-117.|Published in: American political prints, 1766-1876 / Bernard F. Reilly. Boston : G.K. Hall, 1991, entry 1837-16.

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U.S. History
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Library of Congress - Cartoons 1766-1876
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06/08/2013
America. A National Song
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An allegorical illustration on the cover of a patriotic song, dedicated to the "National Guards of Philadelphia." A pronouncedly decollete Columbia or Liberty figure sits astride a bald eagle which flies over the globe. The eagle clutches lightning bolts and an olive branch in its talons, while Columbia holds a scroll (probably the Constitution) and an American flag.|Entered . . . 1859 by Lewis Dela . . . Pennsylvania.|Lewis N. Rosenthal Lith. Phila.|Philadelphia, Lee & Walker, 722 Chestnut Street.|The Library's copy of the music cover was deposited for copyright on September 15, 1859.|Title appears as it is written on the item.|Published in: American political prints, 1766-1876 / Bernard F. Reilly. Boston : G.K. Hall, 1991, entry 1859-2.

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U.S. History
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06/13/2013
American Citizens! We Appeal To You In All Calmness. Is It Not Time To Pause? . . . A Paper Entitled The American Patriot
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An advertisement announcing publication of the "American Citizen," a short-lived nativist newspaper. The broadside is illustrated with an elaborate and venomous anti-Catholic scene. At left a temple of Liberty stands on a mound labeled "Constitution and Laws." At the foot of the hill is a gathering of native Americans, including sailors, farmers, soldiers, and a Revolutionary War veteran. They hold banners emblazoned with such mottoes as "The Bible The Cornerstone of Liberty," "Beware of Foreign Influence," "None But Americans Shall Rule America," and "Education, Morality, and Religion." Other banners bear the names of sites of great revolutionary battles. In the background are a harbor with ships and the skyline of a city. In contrast, an unruly contingent of foreigners, mostly Irish, alight from a newly landed ship at right. The ship, "from Cork," bears the papal coat of arms. The foreigners carry banners reading, "We Are Bound to Carry Out the Pious Intentions of His Holiness the Pope," "Americans Shant Rule Us!!" and "Fradom of Spache and Action!" Among them are several clerics, a drunken mother with several children, and a few unkempt ruffians. One of the newcomers (lower right) beats a man with a club. In the distance, across the ocean, the basilica of St. Peter's in Rome is visible. From it issues a giant basilisk wearing the pope's crown, which is seized by a large hand from above. A commentary is provided in the lengthy continuation of the title: "Already the enemies of our dearest institutions, like the foreign spies in the Trojan horse of old, are within our gates. They are disgorging themselves upon us, at the rate of Hundreds of Thousands Every Year! They aim at nothing short of conquest and supremacy over us." Below the illustration the text states that the "American Patriot" favors "protection of American Mechanics Against Foreign Pauper Labor. Foreigners having a residence in the country of 21 years before voting, Our present Free School System, and Carrying out the laws of the State, as regards sending back Foreign Paupers and Criminals." The paper opposes "Papal Agression & Roman Catholicism, Foreigners holding office, Raising Foreign Military Companies in the United States, Nunneries and Jesuits, To being taxed for the support of Foreign paupers millions of dollars yearly To secret Foreign Orders in the U.S." |The Patriot is published by J.E. Farwell & Co., 32 Congress St., Boston, and for sale at the Periodical Depots in this place.|Title appears as it is written on the item.|Purchase; Caroline and Erwin Swann Memorial Fund.|Forms part of: American cartoon print filing series (Library of Congress)|Published in: American political prints, 1766-1876 / Bernard F. Reilly. Boston : G.K. Hall, 1991, entry 1852-3.

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U.S. History
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06/13/2013
The American Flag, A New National Lyric
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A patriotic, Unionist sheet music illustration. Liberty stands on a pedestal, wearing a Phrygian cap, a white tunic over a long gown emblazoned with stars, and a red sash. She holds a sword in her right hand and a staff with American flag in her left.|Entered according to Act of Congress by Charles S. Stoddard.|Gilmour & Dean, Litho.|The Library's copy of the music sheet was deposited for copyright by Charles S. Stoddard on April 18, 1862.|Title appears as it is written on the item.|Published in: American political prints, 1766-1876 / Bernard F. Reilly. Boston : G.K. Hall, 1991, entry 1862-4.

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06/08/2013
American Liberty
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An illustrated sheet music cover for a patriotic song by Freeman Scott. The title appears on a striped shield with laurel and oak branches below and a flag, liberty pole and cap, spears, and bundled fasces (symbolic of unity) behind.|Entered . . . 1850 by M. Keller & J. Neff . . . Eastern District of Philadelphia.|Philadelphia Mathias Keller & J. Neff . . . Baltimore W. C. Peters.|Title appears as it is written on the item.|Published in: American political prints, 1766-1876 / Bernard F. Reilly. Boston : G.K. Hall, 1991, entry 1850-3.

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U.S. History
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Library of Congress - Cartoons 1766-1876
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06/13/2013
The American Marseillaise, Or Voice of The People
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An illustrated sheet music cover for a Whig campaign song, "The American Marseillaise," composed by Benjamin Cahill to mark the July 4, 1844, Boston Clay rally. In keeping with the title and the occasion of the piece the artist evokes the memory of the Revolution, and draws a parallel between George Washington and Whig presidential candidate Henry Clay. Oval medallion portraits of Washington (left) and Clay (right) are suspended by ribbons decorated with wreaths or leaf clusters. From each oval hang the tendrils of a vine. The ribbons are held by an eagle (center) and are labeled "Pater et Fili" (i.e., father and son), referring to Washington and Clay respectively. Below the eagle is a view of Boston and its harbor with the Bunker Hill Monument obelisk (its size considerably exaggerated) surrounded by crowds of troops and people.|Entered . . . 1844 by B. Cahill.|The Library's copy of the cover was deposited for copyright on July 3, 1844.|Title appears as it is written on the item.|Published in: American political prints, 1766-1876 / Bernard F. Reilly. Boston : G.K. Hall, 1991, entry 1844-11.

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U.S. History
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Library of Congress - Cartoons 1766-1876
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06/13/2013
The American Ram
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On the cover of a patriotic song dedicated to Lincoln's secretary of the navy Gideon Welles Uncle Sam rides a "ram," or ironclad steam vessel, down the Mississippi River. The Library's copy of the music cover was deposited for copyright on August 22, 1863, soon after two decisive Union victories on the Mississippi: Vicksburg (July 4) and Port Hudson (July 9). Welles was responsible for ushering the Union navy into the age of ironclad steamers. Several lines of verse on the cover praise the ironclad rams as "shaking the world with rampant dismay! Iron-harnessed, steam-driven, t sweeps o'er the sea, Our American Rampart, the shield of the free!" |Entered . . . 1863 by H. Tolman & Co. . . . Mass.|Published by Henry Tolman & Co. 291 Washington St.|Signed: Green, eng. (Probably Henry F. Green or Greene).|Title appeas as it is written on the item.|Published in: American political prints, 1766-1876 / Bernard F. Reilly. Boston : G.K. Hall, 1991, entry 1863-11.

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U.S. History
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Library of Congress - Cartoons 1766-1876
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06/13/2013
American Sympathy and Irish Backguardism
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A critical look at Irish Repeal movement leader Daniel O'Connell's condemnation of slavery in the United States. Clay portrays O'Connell's agitation against slavery as an affront to American friends of repeal, who contributed sizable amounts of money for "rent" to support the insurgent movement in Ireland. Conversely, Clay also portrays English-supported American abolitionists as inimical to repeal. In the cartoon is an effeminately dressed Robert Tyler, son and personal secretary to John Tyler, as well as a published poet and repeal advocate. Armed with his "Epitaph on Robert Emmet" (an earlier Irish patriot) and "Ahaseurus" (his religious poem, published in 1842) young Tyler presents O'Connell to his father. Robert Tyler proclaims, "Mr. O'Connell this is my Father, he is a great friend to repeal and when he is re elected he will give you his "mite." I am his Son and though I've got no money I've a great deal of Poetry in me--I have begun Robert Emmet's epitaph-from the sale of which I have no doubt I shall be able to send a large Army to Ireland." President Tyler, rising from his chair, says, "Welcome Mr. O'Connell! I'm just what Bobby says I am--I am all for repeal no halfway man but go the whole figure you jolly old Beggar." O'Connell wears knee-breeches and a hat decorated with a republican cockade and a clay pipe. He holds a club marked "Agitation" and a sack "Repale Rint" (i.e., "repeal rent"), and retorts, "Arrah! give up your Slaves I'd rather shake hands wid a pick-pocket than wid a Slave Holder, and if we ge our repale we'll set em all free before you can say Pathernoster--I dont want any of your blood-stained money!" An abolitionist resembling William Lloyd Garrison, with a document "Petition to Tyler to emancipate his slaves" under his arm, touches O'Connell's shoulder. He reassures the Irishman, "Friend Daniel, we will join you in all your views. your cause and ours is one only we dont want to meddle with Irish repeal for fear we may lose our English friends." On the left a black house slave standing beside Tyler's chair adds "By jolly I wish Massa Harry Clay [Kentucky senator Henry Clay] was here--Dis dam low Irishman not dare talk to him dat way!"|Entered . . . 1843 by H.R. Robinson.|H.R. Robinson 142 Nassau St. New York, Lithy in all its branches.|Signed with monogram: EWC (Edward Williams Clay).|Title appears as it is written on the item.|Weitenkampf, p. 71.|Forms part of: American cartoon print filing series (Library of Congress)|Published in: American political prints, 1766-1876 / Bernard F. Reilly. Boston : G.K. Hall, 1991, entry 1843-2.

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U.S. History
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Library of Congress - Cartoons 1766-1876
Date Added:
06/08/2013
Animal Magnetism
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A swipe at President Van Buren's independent treasury system and his continuation of the monetary policies of predecessor Andrew Jackson. The artist, clearly in sympathy with the Whigs, links corruption in the federal customs and postal systems with the sub-treasury system, whereby federal funds were to be retained by the revenue-collecting agencies and other designated repositories, instead of private banks. The artist forecasts Van Buren's defeat in the 1840 elections. Van Buren, hypnotized by Jackson, is on a couch with a royal crown and scepter on one side and sword and purse on the other. Jackson, his toes touching Van Buren's, sits in a chair to the left with his white plug hat and cane next to him. On the right Treasury Secretary Levi Woodbury (arms crossed), Postmaster General Amos Kendall, and "Globe" editor Francis Preston Blair (far right) observe. Jackson: "Are you asleep? Do you hear me? Tell me what you see?" Van Buren: "I am asleep. I hear nobody but you.--I see a great pole, and a crowd of people. They are cheering an elderly man; whom they hail as President of the United States. On their banners are inscribed Whig Principles!!! I see a little man tumbling down a precipice; on his back is a mill stone inscribed Sub-treasury! oh! lord, oh! lord! Why it is myself!" Woodbury: "Ask him Dr. Jackson, if he sees any thing of "Price" or Swartwout?" (See "Price Current" and "Sub Treasurers Meeting in England," nos. 1838-21 and -20.) Kendall: "Ask him at what rate the Express Mail for North is going now?" Blair: "This will make a good paragraph for the Globe!"|Entered . . . 1839 by John Childs.|New York. Published & sold by J. Childs, Lithographer. 119, Fulton-Street.|Signed with monogram: EWC (Edward Williams Clay).|The Library's impression of the print was deposited for copyright on February 22, 1839.|Title appears as it is written on the item.|Davison, no. 122.|Weitenkampf, p. 58.|Forms part of: American cartoon print filing series (Library of Congress)|Published in: American political prints, 1766-1876 / Bernard F. Reilly. Boston : G.K. Hall, 1991, entry 1839-2.

Subject:
U.S. History
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06/08/2013
Anti Annexation Procession
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A cynical look at the opposition to American annexation of Texas during the 1844 campaign. At the head of a motley procession is Whig candidate and professed anti-annexationist Henry Clay, riding a raccoon (which looks more like a fox). He is followed by three groups of men. The first (right) are the "Hartford Convention Blue-Lights," who shout, "God save the King!" and "Millions for Tribute! not a cent for defence Go it Strong!" Next (center) is a line of "Sunday Mail Petitioners," led by Clay's strongly religious running-mate Theodore Frelinghuysen, riding a donkey and dressed in clerical robes. They represent the proponents of eliminating postal service on Sundays in the United States, whose campaign was criticized by many as a threat to the separation of church and state. One of them remarks, "I go for the Good old times! wholesome, Fine and Imprisonment!" Prominent antislavery advocate William Lloyd Garrison leads the third group. He displays the banner of "Non Resistance, No Government No Laws--Except the 15 Gallon Law!" His folllowers are the "Abolition Martyrs" (far left), who have been tarred-and-feathered for their activism.|Entered . . . 1844 by J. Baillie.|Lith. & pubd. by James Baillie 118 Nassau St. N.Y.|Signed: H. Bucholzer.|The Library's impression was deposited for copyright on August 26, 1844.|Title appears as it is written on the item.|Weitenkampf, p. 77.|Forms part of: American cartoon print filing series (Library of Congress)|Published in: American political prints, 1766-1876 / Bernard F. Reilly. Boston : G.K. Hall, 1991, entry 1844-43.

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U.S. History
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Library of Congress - Cartoons 1766-1876
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06/13/2013
Antimasonic Convention In Valdimor [on The] Corner-Stone March
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An illustrated sheet music cover for a march dedicated to the Masons. According to the text the march was performed "at the Ceremony of laying the Corner Stone of the Masonic Temple, Boston." The illustration parodies the national convention of the Antimasonic party, held in September 1831 in Baltimore ("Valdimor"). The convention nominated William Wirt for President and Amos Ellmaker for Vice President. The attendees are pictured as asses, geese, goats, and other animals gathered at a table presided over by a donkey wearing spectacles (center). A horse at left says, "Mr. President I should like to know what course we are to pursue with regard to the Presidency. I hope no candidate will be entered who is not a "full blooded" Antimason. rather than vote for any other I will "run" for the office myself." A cat in the background says, "No secret societies." A pig at right: "...I agree with my friend opposite. To save my own "Bacon" I would not vote for any man who would not go the "Whole Hog" for Antimasonry. A dog: "...I'm not used to many words. I never spin out a long yarn without getting into a "snarl." I've only to say, that since I have em"barked" in this business I am resolved to go the hull figure." On the wall in the background a clock reads five minutes to midnight.|Boston. Published by C. Bradlee 164 Washington St.|Drawn by David Claypool Johnston.|Entered . . . 1832 by C. Bradlee.|The print appears to have been drawn by David Claypool Johnston. Malcolm Johnson records a sketch for the illustration in the collection of the American Antiquarian Society. D. C. Johnston's "Much Ado about Nothing" (see 1832-3), published in Boston slightly later, is akin in style, lettering, and in the nature of the scene. Both prints include the motif of a clock on the background wall.|Title appears as it is written on the item.|Johnson, no. 141.|Weitenkampf, p. 27.|Published in: American political prints, 1766-1876 / Bernard F. Reilly. Boston : G.K. Hall, 1991, entry 1832-1.

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U.S. History
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06/13/2013
The Apotheosis
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The print is a fragment of a larger lithograph entitled "Invasion of Cuba," composed of two panels, applauding American "filibustering" expeditions to liberate Cuba from Spain. (See also "The Great Naval Blockade of Round Island" and "Genl Lopez the Cuban Patriot Getting His Cash," nos. 1849-5 and 1850-10.) "Invasion of Cuba" evidently appeared in the wake of Lopez's second failed invasion of Cuba in August 1851. The left panel, "The Expedition," expresses sympathy with American intervention there in defiance of Great Britain. Our panel criticizes the Fillmore administration's conciliatory attitude toward Cuba, and alignment of the island's Spanish rule with the Catholic Church and other conservative powers in Europe. Spanish governor Jose Gutierez de la Concha sits on a throne in the center of a crowded scene, his left foot on the face of the recumbent female figure of Cuba, as he decorates American consul A. F. Owen, who kneels at left. In the right foreground American Secretary of State Daniel Webster holds a "Secret Treaty with Spain" in one hand and behind his back clasps hands with Britain, represented by a lion in sailor's costume. Nearby stands a fox in uniform, probably representing France. To the right of the throne stand various prelates, bishops, and the pope, along with several beasts wearing crowns. On the left of the throne are ministers with star-shaped heads, in a state of agitation. In the left foreground Brother Jonathan, smoking a cigar and waving a saber, carries off a Cuban flag. Above Gutierez's throne are several smaller scenes of Spanish atrocities. On the left is the execution by a Cuban firing squad of American volunteers under W. H. Crittenden in Havana, August 16, 1851. The captive Americans are bound and kneeling. In the center, expedition commander Narciso Lopez is garroted by a black man, as he sits in a chair decorated with a small cross (an anti-Catholic reference). The scene on the right shows two ships, one American and one Cuban, and has the date August 13. It may represent the capture of Crittenden's retreating forces on the high seas. Below the print is the caustic commentary: "Our Consul at Havana decorated by Don Quixote with the Order of the Golden Fleeze for his Neutrality in the Cuba Question under the Applause of the Absolute Powers! The Stars in Consternation. Jonathan runs off swearing: 'Cuba must be smoked' anyhow!"|Signed with monogram: AW.|Title appears as it is written on the item.|Murrell, p. 188-189 (reproduces the complete print).|Weitenkampf, p. 104.|Forms part of: American cartoon print filing series (Library of Congress)|Published in: American political prints, 1766-1876 / Bernard F. Reilly. Boston : G.K. Hall, 1991, entry 1851-4.

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U.S. History
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Library of Congress - Cartoons 1766-1876
Date Added:
06/13/2013
Argument of The Chivalry
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A dramatic portrayal, clearly biased toward the northern point of view, of an incident in Congress which inflamed sectional passions in 1856. The artist recreates the May 22 attack and severe beating of Massachusetts senator Charles Sumner by Representative Preston S. Brooks of South Carolina. Brooks's actions were provoked by Sumner's insulting public remarks against his cousin, Senator Andrew Pickens Butler, and against Illinois senator Stephen A. Douglas, delivered in the Senate two days earlier. The print shows an enraged Brooks (right) standing over the seated Sumner in the Senate chamber, about to land on him a heavy blow of his cane. The unsuspecting Sumner sits writing at his desk. At left is another group. Brooks's fellow South Carolinian Representative Lawrence M. Keitt stands in the center, raising his own cane menacingly to stay possible intervention by the other legislators present. Clearly no help for Sumner is forthcoming. Behind Keitt's back, concealed in his left hand, Keitt holds a pistol. In the foreground are Georgia senator Robert Toombs (far left) and Illinois senator Stephen A. Douglas (hands in pockets) looking vindicated by the event. Behind them elderly Kentucky senator John J. Crittenden is restrained by a fifth, unidentified man. Above the scene is a quote from Henry Ward Beecher's May 31 speech at a Sumner rally in New York, where he proclaimed, "The symbol of the North is the pen; the symbol of the South is the bludgeon." David Tatham attributes the print to the Bufford shop, and suggests that the Library's copy of the print, the only known example, may have been a trial impression, and that the print may not actually have been released. The attribution to Homer was first made by Milton Kaplan.|Probably printed by John H. Bufford, Boston.|Signed with monogram: WH (Winslow Homer).|Title appears as it is written on the item.|Tatham, "Pictorial Responses to the Caning of Senator Sumner," p. 15-16.|Forms part of: American cartoon print filing series (Library of Congress)|Published in: American political prints, 1766-1876 / Bernard F. Reilly. Boston : G.K. Hall, 1991, entry 1856-1.|Exhibited: American Treasures of the Library of Congress.

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06/08/2013
Arms of Ye Confederacie
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A small card bearing a vitriolic indictment of the Confederacy. The artist particularly attacks the the institution of slavery, the foundation of Southern economy. A large shield is flanked by two figures: a planter (left) and a slave. The planter wears spurs and a broad-brimmed hat and smokes a cigar. The slave is clad only in breeches, and his hands are manacled. Above the shield are two crossed flags, the Confederate flag and one bearing a skull and crossbones and the number 290. Between the flags are a rooster and a streamer with the motto "servitudo esto perpetua." On the shield are images associated with the South: a mint julep, a bottle of "Old Rye," a pistol and dagger, a whip and manacles, cotton, tobacco, and sugar plants, and slaves hoeing. In the background left, dominated by the palmetto tree of South Carolina, three planters, one holding a whip, play cards at a table. Beyond, two men duel with pistols. On the right, a female slave is auctioned as two slave children stand by and a black woman watches from a cabin doorway.|G.H. Heap Inv. [i.e., published].|H.H. Tilley Del. et Sc.|Title appears as it is written on the item.|Forms part of: American cartoon print filing series (Library of Congress)|Published in: American political prints, 1766-1876 / Bernard F. Reilly. Boston : G.K. Hall, 1991, entry 1862-13.

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U.S. History
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06/08/2013
"As Yet, I Have Found No Difficulty In Standing Upon My Own Platform"
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A puzzling caricature, probably dealing with Reconstruction under Andrew Johnson's administration. The work is quite crudely drawn. An acrobat, with mustache and sideburns and wearing a jester's cap, holds in each hand a mask, one grinning and one frowning. His legs stretch from the head of Pennsylvania congressman Thaddeus Stevens, who holds a paper labeled "Committee of 15" and is seated on a black man, who crawls on all fours, to the head of an unidentified man (probably Johnson) who holds the U.S. Constitution. The latter's back is turned to the viewer and several geese, some alive and some dead, appear at his feet. Stevens, an abolitionist, was one of the most prominent members of the Joint Committee on Reconstruction, composed of fifteen members of Congress. The fool remarks, "As yet, I have found no difficulty in standing upon my own platform."|Entered according to Act of Congress June 8th 1866.|Title appears as it is written on the item.|Weitenkampf, p. 153.|Forms part of: American cartoon print filing series (Library of Congress)|Published in: American political prints, 1766-1876 / Bernard F. Reilly. Boston : G.K. Hall, 1991, entry 1866-3.

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U.S. History
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The Assassination of The Sage of Ashland
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The artist conveys some of the profound disappointment and anger among Henry Clay's many supporters at the nomination of Zachary Taylor at the June 1848 Whig convention in Philadelphia. The convention's act was seen as a betrayal of the elder Whig statesman. In a scene based on act 3, scene 1 of Shakespeare's "Julius Caesar," the artist portrays Clay's opponents as treacherous conspirators stalking the unsuspecting statesman. Clay is pictured seated in the library of his estate at Ashland in Kentucky, reading the New York "Tribune," whose editor Horace Greeley was a Clay stalwart. Ten men with raised daggers prepare to attack him from behind. These include various Whig powers Daniel Webster, editor James Watson Webb, former New York mayor William V. Brady, Pennsylvania congressman David Wilmot, Kentucky senator and former Clay ally John J. Crittenden, and New York state party boss Thurlow Weed. Webster: "How many times shall Caesar bleed in sport" Webb: "Liberty! Freedom! Tyranny is dead!!!" Wilmot: "Go to the Pulpit Brutus" Brady: "And you too Cassius" Crittenden: "Stand fast together, lest some friend of Caesar's Should Chance" Weed: "By the necessity of my Nature, Your Enemy".|Drawn by "W.J.C."|Entered . . . 1848 by H.R. Robinson.|Published by H.R. Robinson 31 Park Row, (Opposite the Park Fountain) N. York.|Title appears as it is written on the item.|Lorant, p. 188.|Weitenkampf, p. 93.|Forms part of: American cartoon print filing series (Library of Congress)|Published in: American political prints, 1766-1876 / Bernard F. Reilly. Boston : G.K. Hall, 1991, entry 1848-22.

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U.S. History
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06/08/2013
An August Convention
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The National Union Convention met in Philadelphia in August 1866 to create a political party that would back President Andrew Johnson's Reconstruction program and to elect a new Congress. Here, the convention is portrayed as a gathering of muzzled dogs, their collars inscribed with state names, who file toward a large doghouse, the "Wigwam." Except for the unwelcome arrival of Copperheads or Peace Democrats Fernando Wood and C. L. Vallandigham, the meeting was surprisingly harmonious even with the participation of representatives from both North and South. Here two dogs, "Massachusetts" and "South Carolina," side by side, lead the pack toward the Wigwam. Wood and Vallandigham are portrayed as cats, each held by the scruff of its neck by guard dogs Edgar Cowan and J. R. Doolittle. At bottom left stands a dog with a brush and a pail marked "N.Y. Times" tied to its tail. In the background "The Dead Dog of The White House," incumbent Andrew Johnson, lies in the road in front of the presidential mansion, which flies from its roof an American flag labeled "My Policy." "My Policy" was Johnson's campaign catchword. The Philadelphia movement ultimately failed, and anti-Johnson Republicans achieved more than a two-thirds majority in both houses of Congress. |Title appears as it is written on the item.|Weitenkampf, p. 154.|Forms part of: American cartoon print filing series (Library of Congress)|Published in: American political prints, 1766-1876 / Bernard F. Reilly. Boston : G.K. Hall, 1991, entry 1866-4.

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06/13/2013
The Available Party Trying To Get Their Villany Endorsed By The Every Man They Have Assasinated
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Again partisan bitterness, over the perceived Whig betrayal of Henry Clay's hopes for the presidential nomination and over subsequent efforts to obtain Clay's endorsement of Zachary Taylor's candidacy, is vented in this scene. The "available" label is applied in a pejorative sense, suggesting a party whose choice of a candidate was guided not by principles but by public image or popularity. Henry Clay is seated at a desk before three men who present him with a document that reads: "MR. CLAY, we have called on you to humbly request that you will state to your Friends, that you approve of the Philadelphia Convention, and that you Endorse General Taylor as a good Whig." William V. Brady, former mayor of New York City, stands closest to Clay and explains, "Mr. Clay while I was Mayor of the City of New York I used all the Influence I had to have you nominated, you have always been my first choice." Seated in a chair at far right is Senator John J. Crittenden, who urges Brady to tell Clay ". . . that he was our first Choice." Standing next to Brady, holding the endorsement document, is James Watson Webb, publisher of the New York "Courier & Enquirer. " He warns, "hold your tounge [sic] Crittenden you will ruin every thing." Clay responds to their request, "Gentlemen I cannot endorse a note that the drawer himself has not signed," a cunning reference to Taylor's well-known reluctance to specifically commit himself to Whig principles. Portraits of George Washington and Thomas Jefferson hang on the wall behind Clay. |Drawn by "W.J.C."|Entered . . . 1848 by H.R. Robinson.|Published by H.R. Robinson 31, Park Row directly opposite the Park Fountain, adjoining Lovejoys Hotel.|Title appears as it is written on the item.|Weitenkampf, p. 93.|Forms part of: American cartoon print filing series (Library of Congress)|Published in: American political prints, 1766-1876 / Bernard F. Reilly. Boston : G.K. Hall, 1991, entry 1848-23.

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06/08/2013
Bagging The Game
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The artist predicts a decisive Whig victory in the presidential election of 1848, with Whig candidate Zachary Taylor "bagging" all of the states in an electoral sweep. (Taylor actually carried only fifteen of the thirty states.) A kneeling Taylor (left) gathers fallen pigeons, each bearing a state's name, into a bag. Holding up the New York bird he muses, "My purpose would be suited without this fellow, however I'll take him: the more the merrier for the 4th of March next." Taylor's strength in New York was considered questionable before the election. Standing to the right is Lewis Cass with a musket at his side. Looking over at Taylor, he marvels, "What an all devouring appetite the fellow has: I expect he'll bag me in the bargain!" In the background Martin Van Buren is caught by the seat of his trousers on the nails of a fence. Holding a rooster labeled "Proviso" he cries, "Cass, come and help an old crony won't you!" Peering over from behind the fence is Pennsylvania congressman David Wilmot, author of the Wilmot Proviso, who threatens Van Buren with a switch, "I'll teach you to come ta robbing my barn!" Van Buren and the Barnburner Democrats adopted the proviso, which barred slavery in American territory gained in the Mexican War, as the main plank in their 1848 campaign platform.|Probably drawn by E.F. Durang.|Pubd. by Able [i.e., Peter E. Abel] & Durang. Philada.|Title appears as it is written on the item.|Weitenkampf, p. 97.|Forms part of: American cartoon print filing series (Library of Congress)|Published in: American political prints, 1766-1876 / Bernard F. Reilly. Boston : G.K. Hall, 1991, entry 1848-46.

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U.S. History
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06/08/2013
Balloon Ascension To The Presidential Chair
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Reflecting Whig preelection confidence in the campaign of 1844, the artist portrays that party's ascendancy over the Democrats in the race for the presidency. Bucholzer uses the metaphor of a hot-air balloon race between Whig candidates Henry Clay and Theodore Frelinghuysen (on the right) and Democratic nominee James K. Polk. The Whigs ascend with ease; Clay waves a flag and Frelinghuysen points toward the "Presidential Chair" which appears at left on a bed of clouds. The Democratic balloon fails to rise for lack of gas and is prodded with a cane by Andrew Jackson. Jackson says, "I'll use my best endeavours to "poke" [i.e., "Polk"] it up. But it's harder work than gaining the battle of New Orleans!" In the balloon's carriage (actually a wooden tub) are Polk, a Loco Foco Democrat (looking upward through a telescope), and a bag of "Mint drops" (symbolizing the hard-money policies pursued by the Democrats). The carriage is supported by party stalwarts Thomas Hart Benton and John C. Calhoun. Polk says: "I think my friends have placed me in a very ridiculous position! They set me up here only to "poke" fun at me." Calhoun warns: "Push hard, Benton, or they'll never get any higher." Benton: "I'm afraid they'll have to throw the mint drops overboard!" From above, Clay offers: "Throw us a line, Polk, and we'll give you a tow!" Meanwhile, in the background a fox with the head of Martin van Buren slinks away saying, "If you had had the wit to put me in there, it would have gone up." He voices his disappointment at not being chosen Democratic nominee.|Entered . . . 1844 by James Baillie.|Lith. & pub. by James Baillie 33 Spruce St. N.Y.|Signed: H. Bucholzer.|The Library has two states of the print, one a proof before title (Landauer Collection; LC-USZ62-90665). The titled impression was deposited for copyright on June 26, 1844. It was followed two weeks later by the same artist's "Bursting the Balloon" (no. 1844-33), a companion piece or sequel.|Title appears as it is written on the item.|Weitenkampf, p. 78.|Forms part of: American cartoon print filing series (Library of Congress)|Published in: American political prints, 1766-1876 / Bernard F. Reilly. Boston : G.K. Hall, 1991, entry 1844-32.

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Library of Congress - Cartoons 1766-1876
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06/13/2013
Baltimore Convention, Old Tippecanoe, A Patriotic Song
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An illustrated sheet music cover for a "Patriotic Song. Written, to be sung at Baltimore during the Young Men's Whig Convention" of May 1840. The composer is identified as "a Pennsylvanian." The illustration, like the song itself, celebrates the distinguished military record of Whig presidential candidate William Henry Harrison. A ring of smoke issues from two cannons and frames the central view of a log cabin in the wilderness. Outside the house are a cider barrel, a plough, a covered wagon, and (in the foreground) an ox cart and driver. Superimposed on the smoke ring are nine ovals containing scenes from Harrison's military career. They are (counterclockwise from bottom): Ensign Harrison 19 years of age" "Lieut. Harrison at Maumee Rapids" "Govr. Harrison making a treaty with the Sacke & Fox Indians" "Genl. Harrison hastening at night to the assistance of Genl. Winchester" "Harrison's Victory at the Thames" "Harrison's Victory at Tippecanoe" "Genl. Harrison & his Army going into winter quarters at the Maumee Rapids, in 1812" "Genl.Harrison in 1812 at the Head of 7000 Troops" "Genl. Harrison at the Council of Vincennes with Tecumseh." At the top of the oval is a bust of Harrison flanked by flags, muskets, bayonets, and fasces. Over his head hovers a dove holding a star.|Entered . . . 1840 by Ld. Meignen & Co.|Leopold. Meignen & Co. Publishers & Importers of Music.|On Stone by James Queen.|P.S. Duval, Lith Phila.|The Library's impression of the print is damaged slightly, with a tear running through the log house.|Title appears as it is written on the item.|Published in: American political prints, 1766-1876 / Bernard F. Reilly. Boston : G.K. Hall, 1991, entry 1840-11.

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Library of Congress - Cartoons 1766-1876
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06/13/2013
The Baltimoreans Going The Whole Ass Tail and All
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Caricature of Fanny Elssler, in carriage being drawn by men with ears of jackasses, going to Baltimore.|Signed in stone: HB.|Title appears as it is written on the item.|Forms part of: American cartoon print filing series (Library of Congress)

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The Bandits Bride Vide Herald May 5th 1847
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Lith. & pub. by H.R. Robinson 142 Nassau St. N. York.|Title appears as it is written on the item.|Forms part of: American cartoon print filing series (Library of Congress)

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06/13/2013
Barn-Burners In A Fix
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A satire on the Barnburners, a radical faction of New York State Democrats, led by John Van Buren, whose commitment to social and monetary reforms was likened to a farmer's burning his barn to rid it of rats. Here the barn is ablaze, trapping several of the movement's leaders on its roof. Benjamin F. Butler, raising his arms, vows, "If I ever get out of this scrape safe it's the last act of Barn burning that I'll be guilty of." New York "Evening Post" editor and radical spokesman William Cullen Bryant despairs, "Woe is me! I can't get off, and if I stay up here it's sure destruction!" An unidentified man says, "Alas! alas! we're caught in a tight fix." At right John Van Buren vainly tries to raise a ladder to the roof, complaining, "I can't get near enough to help them down with the ladder, so old Dad you'd better jump off." His father, Martin Van Buren, appearing here as a fox, leaps from the other end of the roof, saying, "Our sufferings is intolerable! I'll take your advice my son and jump off--So here goes!" On the far right New Hampshire Democrat Franklin Pierce has mired his wagon in a muddy lane. It is loaded with boxes "Free Trade" and "No Internal Improvements," traditional Democratic planks. Pierce calls to Bryant, "there's more truth than poetry in what you say. We never needed your help more, for we are stuck in the mud and want your shoulder to the wheel." Although Weitenkampf tentatively dates the cartoon 1847, the inclusion of Franklin Pierce suggests a later date. The work apparently relates to the regular Democrats' 1852 solicitation of Barnburner support for Pierce, who was their presidential candidate that year.|Pubd. by John Childs, 84 Nassau St. N. York.|Title appears as it is written on the item.|Weitenkampf, p. 89.|Forms part of: American cartoon print filing series (Library of Congress)|Published in: American political prints, 1766-1876 / Bernard F. Reilly. Boston : G.K. Hall, 1991, entry 1852-36.

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The Battle of Bull's Run
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Cartoon print shows Union troops after the Battle of Bull Run during the Civil War from the point of view of a copperhead, that is, a northern Democrat supporting Confederate troops. The image is keyed to eighteen points in the image: Beauregard's headquarters, Jefferson Davis' headquarters, Johnston's headquarters, Elzy's Maryland battery, General McDowell, General Tyler, The Bull's Run, Fire Zouaves, New York 19th Regiment, Sherman's battery, Ely member of Congress, barricade for member of Congress, Lovejoy & Company, Ladies as spectators, Riddle Brown & Company, Blenker's Brigade, Senator Wilson, and the U.S. Dragoon.|Lith. fr[?] A. Pfott.|Title appears as it is written on the item.|Forms part of: American cartoon print filing series (Library of Congress)

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Battle of Cerro Gordo
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An attack on James K. Polk's attempts to undermine Winfield Scott's military efforts and reputation through his handling of the Mexican War in April 1847. Shortly after Scott's victory at Cerro Gordo, Polk dispatched State Department official Nicholas Trist to Mexico to negotiate peace with the Mexican government. The artist views the move, as did many contemporaries, as motivated by political concerns about the Whig general's presidential ambitions. Scott, on a large hill at right, offers a steaming plate of soup to departing Mexican commander Santa Anna, who rides away on horseback. (For the soup allusion see "Distinguished Military Operations," no. 1846-15). From a ravine behind Scott, Polk goads Trist as he aims a water hose at the general. The hose is fueled by a pump operated by two boys in the background. In the distance American troops engage the Mexicans on the hills near Cerro Gordo. In the upper left appears the dialogue: Scott: "General Santa Anna!! do stop and take 'a hasty plate of soup?'" Santa Anna: "I thank you, Sir, your soup's too hot-I must be off!" Polk: "Trist, take care & cool 'old Hasty's' soup, before "our friend" meets him again." Trist: "Your Excellency will pardon me, but I've tried in vain to cool 'Old Hasty's' soup." Polk: "Then put out 'Old Hasty's' fire, or "that fatal soup will burn our fingers yet!" Trist: "Your excellency would do well to send 'Old Hasty' home and give "our friend" 'Pillow' for his Comfort." The last reference was to Gen. Gideon J. Pillow, an incompetent but a favorite of Polk, whose antagonism toward Scott was public knowledge, particularly after Cerro Gordo.|Title appears as it is written on the item.|Weitenkampf, p. 89.|Forms part of: American cartoon print filing series (Library of Congress)|Published in: American political prints, 1766-1876 / Bernard F. Reilly. Boston : G.K. Hall, 1991, entry 1847-2.

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06/13/2013
Battle of Churrubusco
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A slightly modified version of "Battle of Cerro Gordo" (no. 1847-2), in all likelihood produced by the same lithographer. The scene is quite similar, except for the inclusion of the later battle (the Battle of Churubusco, fought on August 20, 1847) in the background, and the addition of the figure of Gen. Gideon J. Pillow on the left. As in the earlier cartoon Scott chases Mexican commander Santa Anna away with a steaming plate of soup. Trist aims his hose at Scott, but its spray falls short of him. Polk remonstrates to General Pillow, who holds a pillow in his hands. The dialogue reflects mounting tensions between Scott and Pillow, Polk's friend and favorite in the field: Scott: "General, O do "now" stop and try my 'hasty plate of soup?'" Santa Anna: "Never, no never again, it's ginger tea & quite too hot for me!" Polk: "Trist, I told you, Sir, to throw cold water on that 'hasty plate of soup!'" Trist: "Your Excellency! I've tried my best in vain--that soup I cannot reach." Polk: "My dear Pillow do advance and give my friend another passport [alluding to Polk's mistake in allowing Santa Anna's return from exile in 1846], with something soft whereon to rest his weary head. He did not ask "such soup" from me!" Pillow: "Rely on me, my Cousin Polk, I'll cool that soup as 'Leonidas' cooled the Persians at Thermopola." Polk: "It wont do! 'Old Hasty' must be stopped--My honor's gone with that brave Mexican--Cool soup would suit him best, he'd sip, and sip and sip again & give out his Pronunciamentos--his honor save, and my ends gain, 'Old Hasty' to disgrace, but alas! were both undone--but no! 'Old Hasty' shall be made to pay the cost of his audacity--I'll strike him down & send him home!" Pillow: "My dear Cousin you know you have the power, 'tis but to use it, & 'tis done, just as you say."|Title appears as it is written on the item.|Weitenkampf, p. 89.|Forms part of: American cartoon print filing series (Library of Congress)|Published in: American political prints, 1766-1876 / Bernard F. Reilly. Boston : G.K. Hall, 1991, entry 1847-3.

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Battle of Ridgeway, C.W. Victory of Gen'l O'neil. "Masterly" Retreat of The Queens Own
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Entered according to Act of Congress, in the year 1866 by L.C. Mix & Co. in the clerk's office of the District Court of the United States, for the Northern District of New York.|Inscribed in ink upper left: Entd. & Deposd. October 9, 1866.|Title appears as it is written on the item.|Forms part of: American cartoon print filing series (Library of Congress)

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Behind The Scenes
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Another venomous attack on the Lincoln administration by the artist of "The Commander-in-Chief Conciliating the Soldier's Votes, no. 1864-31," and "The Sportsman Upset by the Recoil of His Own Gun," (no. 1864-32). Here Lincoln and his cabinet are shown in a disorderly backstage set, preparing for a production of Shakespeare's "Othello." Lincoln (center) in blackface plays the title role. He recites, "O, that the slave had forty thousand lives! I am not valiant neither:--But why should honour outlive honesty? Let it go all." Behind Lincoln two men, one with his leg over a chair, comment on Lincoln's reading. "Not quite appropriately costumed, is he?" comments the first. The second replies, "Costumed, my dear Sir? Never was such enthusiasm for art:--Blacked himself all over to play the part, Sir!" These may be Republicans Charles Sumner and Thaddeus Stevens. Before them is a wastebasket of discarded documents, including the Constitution, Crittenden Compromise, Monroe Doctrine, "Webster's Speeches," "Decisions of Supreme Court," and "Douglass." At left five ballerinas stand beneath a playbill advertising "Treasury Department, A New Way to Pay Old Debts . . . Raising the Wind . . . Ballet Divertissement." Near their feet is a pile of silver and plate, "Properties of the White House." They listen to a fiddler who, with his back turned to the viewer, stands lecturing before them. At right Secretary of War Edwin Mcm.asters Stanton instructs a small troop of Union soldiers waiting in the wings to ". . . remember, you're to go on in the procession in the first Act and afterwards in the Farce of the Election." One soldier protests, "Now, see here, Boss that isn't fair. We were engaged to do the leading business." Nearby an obviously inebriated Secretary of State William Seward sits at a table with a bottle, muttering, "Sh--shomethin's matt'r er my little bell: The darned thing won't ring anyway cĚ_Ąonfixit'." Seward reportedly once boasted that he could have any individual arrested merely by ringing a bell. He was widely criticized for his arbitrary imprisonment of numerous civilians during the war. On the floor near Seward sits Lincoln's running mate Andrew Johnson, a straw dummy, with a label around his ankle, "To be left till called for." At far right Navy Secretary Gideon Welles slumbers, holding a paper marked "Naval Engagement, Sleeping Beauty, All's Well That Ends Well." In the background abolitionist editor Horace Greeley bumbles about moving scenery and complaining, "O bother! I can't manage these cussed things." Union general Benjamin F. Butler (directly behind Lincoln), dressed as Falstaff, recites, "We that take purses, go by the moon and seven stars; and not by Phoebus! I would to God, thou and I knew where a commodity of good names were to be bought!" He holds a sign "Benefit . . . Falstaff . . . Beauty and the Beast." By this time Butler had achieved notoriety as a dissolute plunderer. To Butler's right a man (who might be the stage manager) orders the crew, "Get ready to shift there 'ere Flats for the Temple of Liberty." The artist of this and nos. 1864-30 and -31 was an exceptionally able draftsman. Judging from the acidity of these satires, he may have been a Southerner, perhaps a Baltimorean. The only satires of the time that compare in artistic quality and political venom are those of Adalbert Volck.|Signed with monogram: CAL?|Title appears as it is written on the item.|Weitenkampf, p. 141.|Forms part of: American cartoon print filing series (Library of Congress)|Published in: American political prints, 1766-1876 / Bernard F. Reilly. Boston : G.K. Hall, 1991, entry 1864-32.

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The Bell and Everett Schottisch
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An illustrated sheet music cover for campaign music honoring Constitutional Union party candidates John Bell and Edward Everett. The candidates' bust portraits are framed in floral and acanthus tracery. In the upper right a streamer with stars and stripes hangs on the twigs which sprout from the rusticated wooden letters of Everett's name. Below is an arrangement of motifs, including an eagle with shield, a cannon, flags, and a fasces. In the distance (left) is a harbor with several ships.|Entered . . . 1860 by Firth, Pond & Co.|Sarony, Major & Knapp Liths. 449 Broadway, N.Y.|Title appears as it is written on the item.|Published in: American political prints, 1766-1876 / Bernard F. Reilly. Boston : G.K. Hall, 1991, entry 1860-17.

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A Big Blue Bottle Fly In The Web
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Another swipe at Whig candidate Winfield Scott's manipulation by antislavery Whigs Seward and Greeley. Here, Scott is a fly caught in a large web, spun by spiders Greeley (left) and Seward (right). Scott exclaims, "I think I've got myself into a hobble!" Greeley, hanging from a thread, decides, "I must hurry up & cover him with our slime as fast as possible!" Seward adds, "I hope he won't break through before I get him secured!" At lower left, Massachusetts Whig Daniel Webster and New York editor James Watson Webb look on. Webster remarks, "What an extraordinary web, Webb!" Webb replies, "Yes it's one of that crafty old spider Seward's and he has caught a large fly who wont get out Scot free--Can't you stir it up a little, Webster!"|Published by John Childs, 84 Nassau St. N. York.|Signed with monogram: EWC (Edward Williams Clay).|Title appears as it is written on the item.|Davison, no. 204.|Weitenkampf, p. 107.|Forms part of: American cartoon print filing series (Library of Congress)|Published in: American political prints, 1766-1876 / Bernard F. Reilly. Boston : G.K. Hall, 1991, entry 1852-30.

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A Bivouack In Safety Or Florida Troops Preventing A Surprise
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Another parody of Van Buren administration efforts to end the long and costly Second Seminole War in Florida. The War Department was regularly subjected to public and congressional attacks for cruelty, waste, and incompetence in its prosecution of the war. It drew especially heavy fire for the introduction of Cuban bloodhounds to hunt the Seminoles in early 1840. (See "The Secretary of War," no. 1840-5). Several dandified soldiers lounge in a commodious tent as a corps of uniformed bloodhounds stand guard outside. Their standard says "Puppy Guard Sentinel." The soldiers are surrounded by luxury items like "Windsor Soap (soft)," cigars, and "eau de cologne," and one is fanned by an Indian squaw. One soldier remarks, brushing his long hair, "I say Major, as we are in no danger of losing our scalps, we may as well put our Soap locks on the Peace Establishment." Another, playing chess, says, "Since our new Allies from Cuba have joined us, we can have a quiet game of Chess without any fear of a check from our red friends in the Swamp." An older, pipe-smoking soldier laments, "Ah! the Army is not what it was! Where's the Hero of Tippecanoe." (He refers to Whig presidential candidate William Henry Harrison.)|Lith. & pub. by H.R. Robinson 52 Cortlandt St. N.Y. & Pennsa Ave Washington D.C.|Signed with monogram: HD (Henry Dacre?).|Title appears as it is written on the item.|Fowble, no. 338.|Murrell, p. 144.|Weitenkampf, p. 59.|Forms part of: American cartoon print filing series (Library of Congress)|Published in: American political prints, 1766-1876 / Bernard F. Reilly. Boston : G.K. Hall, 1991, entry 1840-6.

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06/13/2013
Black C.C. Or The Three Judas's
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The cartoon pertains to some instance of corruption in the Van Buren administration. Van Buren shovels coins from a great pile into a bag held by a man (probably a federal judge), who urges him, "Matty fill up the shovel, you are not the first man, I have helped out of a dirty scrape what is a little bribery and corruption to us limbs of the law, I have been the means of clearing hundreds." At left wait two other men, called "Black" and "Cooper," holding bags. Black to Cooper: "I mean to take my mint drops to Hansells the broker and get depreciated paper for it. that will do to pay my landlady her bill and all my other expenses too." Cooper: "Black dont you think the judge will preach a good sermon for this. when he gets in Georgia. I say Matty dont you mean to count it. I wish I had brought a larger bag." Van Buren: "No Mr. Cooper I'm above numbers a shovel full or two more or less is of no consequence I will charge it all to the account of the Florida War [i.e., the expensive conflict with the Seminole Indians which dragged on throughout Van Buren's presidency]." "Black.C.C." is probably the work of Napoleon Sarony, given its affinity in draftsmanship and lithographic technique to his "The New Era or Effects of a Standing Army" (no. 1840-3).|Printed & published by H.R. Robinson, 52 Cortlandt St. N.Y. & Pennsa. Avenue Washington D.C.|Probably drawn by Napoleon Sarony.|Title appears as it is written on the item.|Weitenkampf, p. 62.|Forms part of: American cartoon print filing series (Library of Congress)|Published in: American political prints, 1766-1876 / Bernard F. Reilly. Boston : G.K. Hall, 1991, entry 1840-4.

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Blake's Patriotic Log Cabin Music
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A Whig campaign song in praise of William Henry Harrison, illustrated with a rural tableau of the candidate's fabled log cabin on the Ohio River. The cabin stands in a clearing, and flies an American flag. A cider barrel is beside its open door, around which grows a vine. Outside, Harrison, in shirtsleeves and with his hand resting on a shovel, speaks with a drover or farmer whose ox wagon waits nearby. The drover raises a glass of cider. In the foreground is a plough, and in the background a man works on a rail fence. The song is "Respectfully Inscribed to all true Republicans in the United States."|Entered . . . 1840 by G.E. Blake . . . Eastern District of Pena.|Sinclair's Lith.|Title appears as it is written on the item.|Published in: American political prints, 1766-1876 / Bernard F. Reilly. Boston : G.K. Hall, 1991, entry 1840-15.

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The Blessings of Liberty Or How To "hook" A "gentleman of Color"
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A diverse group of abolitionists try to drag an unwilling black man toward the left with a large gaff hook. Holding the hook are (left to right) an old hag, a Quaker man, and two other homely men. The hag declares, "How perverse our dear colored brother is, I shall break my wind if I pull much longer." The Quaker says, "Verily it is hard work to set this Ethiopian at liberty. I fear we must break his back before we can succeed." A woman behind him enjoins "Pull on brethren till you have broken every yoke." Another young woman (center) asks the black, "Don't you feel the blessings of liberty?" The black protests, "Bress my soul, Massa Robolition, why you kidnap me 'way from Massa Clay? Let poor nigger go 'bout his bizness, and hab his own way dis once, and I berry glad." The black struggles to join Henry Clay and Horace Greeley, on the right, who stand with hands joined. The elderly Clay stands leaning on his cane. Greeley, in top hat and white coat, points toward the right and advises Clay, "Don't look behind you, friend Harry, but come and see my crack article on the Tariff." Weitenkampf dates the cartoon 1851, on the basis of the reference to Greeley's support of trade protectionism. The apparent double entendre of the word "hook" in the title is puzzling.|Probably drawn by H. Bucholzer.|Published by Nathaniel Currier, New York?|Title appears as it is written on the item.|Weitenkampf, p. 102.|Forms part of: American cartoon print filing series (Library of Congress)|Published in: American political prints, 1766-1876 / Bernard F. Reilly. Boston : G.K. Hall, 1991, entry 1851-7.

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The Bloody Massacre Perpetrated In King Street Boston On March 5th 1770 By A Party of The 29th Regt.
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A sensationalized portrayal of the skirmish, later to become known as the "Boston Massacre," between British soldiers and citizens of Boston on March 5, 1770. On the right a group of seven uniformed soldiers, on the signal of an officer, fire into a crowd of civilians at left. Three of the latter lie bleeding on the ground. Two other casualties have been lifted by the crowd. In the foreground is a dog; in the background are a row of houses, the First Church, and the Town House. Behind the British troops is another row of buildings including the Royal Custom House, which bears the sign (perhaps a sardonic comment) "Butcher's Hall." Beneath the print are 18 lines of verse, which begin: "Unhappy Boston! see thy Sons deplore, Thy hallowed Walks besmeared with guiltless Gore." Also listed are the "unhappy Sufferers" Saml Gray, Saml Maverick, James Caldwell, Crispus Attucks, and Patrick Carr (killed) and it is noted that there were "Six wounded; two of them (Christr Monk & John Clark) Mortally."|Engrav'd Printed & Sold by Paul Revere Boston.|The print was copied by Revere from a design by Henry Pelham for an engraving eventually published under the title "The Fruits of Arbitrary Power, or the Bloody Massacre," of which only two impressions could be located by Brigham. Revere's print appeared on or about March 28, 1770.|Title appears as it is written on the item.|Brigham, p. 41-57.|Cresswell, no. 246.|Published in: American political prints, 1766-1876 / Bernard F. Reilly. Boston : G.K. Hall, 1991, entry 1770-1.|Published in: Viewpoints; a selection from the pictorial collections of the Library of Congress . . . Washington : Library of Congress, 1975, no. 56.|Exhibited in: Creating the United States, Library of Congress, 2008.

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Bobalition of Slavery
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Another in the series of "bobalition" broadsides, marking the July 14 celebration of the anniversary of the abolition of the slave trade. (See no. 1819-2). The text, facetiously dated "Uly 14teenth 18 hundred and 30 tu," consists of a letter to "Captain Ookpate" from "Pomp Peters" and "Cezar Garbo" regarding the celebratory procession, along with notes on toasts, volunteers, etc. The broadside is illustrated with a cut of a standing black man facing right and another caricature of a strutting militiaman armed with a cutlass and broom.|Title appears as it is written on the item.|Published in: American political prints, 1766-1876 / Bernard F. Rei lly. Boston : G.K. Hall, 1991, entry 1832-4.

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The Buck Chase of 1856
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Democratic candidate James Buchanan, as a buck deer, crosses the finish line of a racecourse ahead of competitors Millard Fillmore and John C. Fremont. Spectators cheer in the stands behind. Fillmore appears as an emaciated horse, fallen on the course. Next, Fremont follows close on the heels of Buchanan. Fremont stands astride two horses: one with the head of New York "Tribune" editor Horace Greeley and the other the "wooly nag" of abolitionism. The latter here more closely resembles a filly than a nag. Greeley: "Monte why didn't you lean more on the wooly horse--you gave me all your weight--never mind we've beat the grey Filly [i.e., Fillmore] next time we'ill head off that hard old Buck." Fremont: "Get out--hang you and the Wooly Horse--I could beat that broken down silver grey "Filly" and the old Buck too--had I gone on my own hook." Fillmore: "Oh! Oh! why did'nt I stay in sweet Italy with my friend King Bomba and the lazy Neapolitans--Then I should not have been blowen up like a Bag of wind in this Chase." Buchanan: "Never mind Gentn. I could not "help" beating you, the American Nation wished it so--I will send you all to Ostend--and I promise you that I will have no Tailors in my white House. [As a youth Fillmore had been apprenticed to a tailor.] Mercy on me! to think that this Glorious People should be almost Pierced to Death [a reference to unpopular Democratic incumbent Franklin Pierce] by War and making Free States in this land of Liberty by a set of Fashion inventores 'I'll none of it.'"|Probably drawn by John L. Magee.|Published by John Childs, 84 So. 3rd St. Phila.|Title appears as it is written on the item.|Published in: American political prints, 1766-1876 / Bernard F. Reilly. Boston : G.K. Hall, 1991, entry 1856-18.

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"Buck" Taking The "pot"
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A pro-Buchanan satire, critical of the divisive or sectionalist appeal of the other two presidential contenders in the 1856 race. "Buck" or Buchanan (left) has evidently won a card game over Fremont (fallen at right) and Millard Fillmore (at right, blindfolded). Holding four aces and a large cauldron of "Union Soup" Buchanan vows, "I have fairly beaten them at their own game, and now that I have became possessed of this great "Reservoir" I will see that each and Every State of this great and glorious Union receives its proper Share of this sacred food." Fremont has tripped over a "Rock of Disunion" and fallen to the ground, still holding his large spoon "Abolition." He laments, "Oh, that I had been born a dog!--This is too much for mortal man to bear. Had I not stumbled over that "Blasted" rock I might have reached the fount of my ambition and with this good ladle 'Deal' to the North, and leave the South to 'Shuffle & Cut' off their mortal coil, by starvation, I shall have to 'Pass'!" Behind Fremont, Fillmore wanders blindfolded, holding a Know Nothing lantern (reflecting his party's nativist affiliation) and a spoon. He despairs, "I regret to say that 'Going It Blind' is a loosing Game, I did hope that I would be able to dip my spoon in the Pot without much difficulty.--My Hand is played out--'Buck' wins, and I am satisfied--Four aces can't be beat! and Buck holds them."|For sale by Nathaniel Currier at No. 2 Spruce St. N.Y.|Title appears as it is written on the item.|Gale, no. 803.|Weitenkampf, p. 118.|Published in: American political prints, 1766-1876 / Bernard F. Reilly. Boston : G.K. Hall, 1991, entry 1856-26.

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The Buffalo Hunt
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An optimistic view of the presidential prospects of Martin Van Buren, nominated at the Free Soil Party's August 1848 convention in Buffalo, New York. Here Van Buren rides a buffalo and thumbs his nose as he sends Democratic candidate Lewis Cass (left) and Whig Zachary Taylor flying. Both are about to land in Salt River. Van Buren says defiantly, "Clear the track! or I'll Ram you both!" Cass, whose "Wilmot Proviso" hat has already landed in the river, exclaims, "Confound this Wilmot Proviso, I'm afraid it will lead to something bad." (On the Wilmot Proviso see "Whig Harmony," no. 1848-21.) Cass's opposition to the proviso put him at odds with a large number of Democrats. Taylor speculates, "If I had stood on the Whig platform firmly, this would not have happened." He cites his reluctance to decisively embrace the regular Whig party doctrines. His cap flies in the air, spilling a packet of "Dead Letters." (On the "dead letter" matter see "The Candidate of Many Parties," no. 1848-24.) |Entered . . . 1848 by H.R. Robinson.|Probably drawn by "W.J.C."|Published by H.R. Robinson 31 Park Row N.Y.|Title appears as it is written on the item.|Weitenkampf, p. 92.|Forms part of: American cartoon print filing series (Library of Congress)|Published in: American political prints, 1766-1876 / Bernard F. Reilly. Boston : G.K. Hall, 1991, entry 1848-38.

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06/08/2013
A Bull Chase. The Words of The Wise, Are As Goads
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Another satire on the special committee of the House of Representatives investigating Van Buren's Treasury Department. The committee, chaired by James Harlan but dominated by Henry A. Wise of Virginia, centered upon Secretary Levi Woodbury and probed irregularities in handling and accounting of federal funds in the customs houses. This occurred in the wake of the Swartwout embezzlement scandal uncovered in November 1838. (See "Price Current" and "Sub Treasurers Meeting in England," nos. 1838-21 and -20.) In "A Bull Chase" Henry A. Wise (left) spears the hindquarters of a bull with the head of Treasury Secretary Woodbury, saying "C'mon Prentiss, I'm into him! He's going to roar!" He apparently addresses Mississippi Congressman Sergeant S. Prentiss, a Whig ally, who is unseen in the wings.|Drawn by Napoleon Sarony?|Entd . . . 1839 by H.R. Robinson.|Printed & publd. by H.R. Robinson, 52 Cortlandt & 1-1/2 Wall St. N.Y.|Title appears as it is written on the item.|Weitenkampf, p. 58 .|Forms part of: American cartoon print filing series (Library of Congress)|Published in: American political prints, 1766-1876 / Bernard F. Reilly. Boston : G.K. Hall, 1991, entry 1839-7.

Subject:
U.S. History
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Primary Source
Provider:
Library of Congress
Provider Set:
Library of Congress - Cartoons 1766-1876
Date Added:
06/13/2013
Bursting The Balloon
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Democratic frustrations in the race for the "Presidential Chair" are again parodied in the sequel or companion to "Balloon Ascension to the Presidential Chair" (no. 1844-32). Here the ascent of the Democrats is foiled as their balloon explodes, dumping Polk (far right) and his vice-presidential running-mate George M. Dallas into Salt River. Henry Clay seems to have punctured the balloon with a flag staff. Already in the water are former Democratic warhorses Martin Van Buren and Andrew Jackson. "Salt River" was a colloquialism for political misfortune or failure. Polk, falling, says: "This is the worst "bust" that I ever went upon!" Van Buren, spouting water: "This salt water makes me spout like a whale." Jackson, waving his cane: "By the eternal! I told them there was too much gas in their balloon." On the left Whig candidates Clay and Frelinghuysen rise triumphantly toward the Presidential Chair in a balloon adorned with an American eagle. Clay says, "Good-bye Polk, you'll find it much easier travelling in that direction!" Frelinghuysen waves to supporters who cheer him from below, "Hurrah! hurrah for the people's choice! They mount upward like eagles!" |Entered . . . 1844 by James Baillie.|H. Bucholzer.|Lithography and print coloring on reasonable terms by James Baillie No. 33 Spruce St. N.Y.|The Library's impression of "Bursting the Balloon" was deposited for copyright on July 10, 1844.|Title appears as it is written on the item.|Weitenkampf, p. 78.|Forms part of: American cartoon print filing series (Library of Congress)|Published in: American political prints, 1766-1876 / Bernard F. Reilly. Boston : G.K. Hall, 1991, entry 1844-33.

Subject:
U.S. History
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Primary Source
Provider:
Library of Congress
Provider Set:
Library of Congress - Cartoons 1766-1876
Date Added:
06/08/2013
[Calendar For 1863]
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An advertising calendar for a lithographic printing firm, decorated with Unionist symbols and motifs. The calendar for 1863 and the first 6 months of 1864 is surrounded with an elaborate framework of floral and acanthus ornament, surmounted by the figure of Columbia or Liberty. The figure is closely based on Thomas Crawford's statue of Freedom on the U.S. Capitol. She stands holding shield and sword, and wearing a robe emblazoned with stars and an eagle headdress with a crown of stars. At her right are symbols of progress, industry, and culture: a locomotive, a plough with a sheaf of grain, a statue, and a printing press. At her left are artifacts of war such as tents, cannons, arms, and an eagle. Flanking the calendar itself are two vignettes. On the left is a peacetime scene, with a farmer holding a scythe as two field hands harvest grain behind him. On the right a soldier with a rifle stands before a battlefield. Two putti appear in the acanthus scrolls below.|Ehrgott, Forbriger & Co. Lithographers, Cincinnati.|Entered . . . 1862 by Ehrgott, Forbriger & Co. . . . Ohio.|The Library's copy of the calendar was deposited for copyright on January 3, 1863.|Title appears as it is written on the item.|Published in: American political prints, 1766-1876 / Bernard F. Reilly. Boston : G.K. Hall, 1991, entry 1862-17.

Subject:
U.S. History
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Primary Source
Provider:
Library of Congress
Provider Set:
Library of Congress - Cartoons 1766-1876
Date Added:
06/13/2013
[Calendar For 1863]
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An advertising calendar for a lithographic printer, with various patriotic motifs and a subtle commentary on the Emancipation Proclamation. The calendar, for 1863, is set within an elaborate architectural framework. The whole is draped with an enormous flag which hangs down from an enthroned Columbia at top. Columbia sits holding a sword and shield, an eagle on her left, and a globe and the Constitution at her feet. Further left are a plough, scythe, and wheat sheaves. On the right appear symbols of progress and industry including a telescope, locomotive, anvil and hammer, millstone and gear wheel, and bales and barrels of goods. On the middle register are symbols of the arts, sciences, and learning, including an easel painting, palette and brushes, musical instruments, books, urns, and a tapestry. On the far left a seaman mans a cannon before a backdrop of sails and smokestacks. On the right an infantryman stands guard with his dog before an encampment. At the bottom are two scenes. The scene on the left shows three black children and a white child, who watches idly as one of the three stands on a cotton bale and whitewashes over a placard reading "1862." Another black child, kneeling on a crude wooden block with chains attached to it (an allusion to slavery), holds the bucket of whitewash, and the third blows soap bubbles. In the scene on the right the roles are reversed: as the white child works, the three black children are idle. Standing on a pedestal labeled "Emancipation," the white boy inscribes the date "1863" on a panel. He holds a portfolio under his arm. A black child sits on a classical cornice at left, holding a small bucket of paint while one of his companions reclines on the ground. The third black child sits fiddling on a fallen column nearby. A small hourglass appears in a vignette below the calendar. |Ehrgott, Forbriger & Co. Lith. Cincinnati.|Entered . . . 1862 by Ehrgott, Forbriger & Co. . . . Ohio.|The Library's impression of the calendar was deposited for copyright on January 3, 1863. |Title appears as it is written on the item.|Published in: American political prints, 1766-1876 / Bernard F. Reilly. Boston : G.K. Hall, 1991, entry 1862-18.

Subject:
U.S. History
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Primary Source
Provider:
Library of Congress
Provider Set:
Library of Congress - Cartoons 1766-1876
Date Added:
06/13/2013
Called To Account
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Once more the House of Representatives investigation of Treasury practices under the Van Buren administration in connection with the Swartwout embezzlement scandal. (See above nos. 1839-6 through -9.) The print must have appeared in January or February, after the House of Representatives voted to form its select investigative committee by ballot. Speaker of the House James K. Polk, perceived as a friend of the administration, was prevented by a Whig majority in the House from appointing the committee himself, as was customary. Here a kneeling, bespectacled Polk is berated by Satan (who could represent Van Buren). Satan: "What does this mean? How came you to let that Committee be chosen by ballot? Don't you know we're undone? Was it for this I made you Chancellor of the Exchequer? Did not you engage to do all our work? and manage the House for my interest? and here's that cursed [Whig Congressman Henry A.] Wise with his Committee breaking in to our Head Quarters! I'll cashier you!!" Polk: "Dread Sir! be not too wratful with your servant; I did my very best. You know I have not the influence I once had; I'm sure I turned & twisted & did all a man could. Pray try me but once more; See if I don't carry your Sub-Treasury Bill for you, & if that passes you know we are all made!" "Called to Account" is most probably by the same artist as "Symptoms of a Duel" (no. 1839-10).|Drawn by HD?|Entd . . . 1839 by H.R. Robinson.|Printed & publd. by H.R. Robinson, 52 Cortlandt & 11-1/2 Wall st. N. Y.|Title appears as it is written on the item.|Weitenkampf, p. 57.|Forms part of: American cartoon print filing series (Library of Congress)|Published in: American political prints, 1766-1876 / Bernard F. Reilly. Boston : G.K. Hall, 1991, entry 1839-11.

Subject:
U.S. History
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Primary Source
Provider:
Library of Congress
Provider Set:
Library of Congress - Cartoons 1766-1876
Date Added:
06/13/2013
The Candidate of Many Parties. A Phrenological Examination To Ascertain What His Political Principles Are
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Whig nominee Zachary Taylor's reluctance to clearly declare his political views was an issue eagerly exploited by the opposition in the 1848 campaign. Here the artist shows phrenologist Orson S. Fowler probing the candidate's skull to determine his "principles," as New York "Tribune" editor Horace Greeley (left) takes notes. Greeley asks, "What for a Prsident would he make?" Fowler replies, "he says he is 'Incompetent,' & so say his developments." Taylor (center) sits grumbling, "When I get to Washington I will turn [Postmaster General] Cave Johnson out, and put a good Military man in his place, This paying 7.50 for "dead letters," is too much for me to stand." Beginning in late July the "dead letter" issue was a source of great popular amusement at Taylor's expense. After Taylor's nomination in early June, he was sent a letter by John Morehead offering him the candidacy. In an economizing move, Taylor had recently instructed the local postmaster in Baton Rouge not to forward to him any letters on which postage was not prepaid. Consequently, Morehead's notification of nomination was among the mail that landed in the dead letter office in Washington, and after several weeks cost Taylor $7.50 to have retrieved. Among the long list of Taylor's characteristics that Greeley and Fowler have compiled are: "A Quick Fiery Temper," "A lack of self respect," and "Disregard for things Sacred." Each of these falls under a broader category, such as "Combativeness," which is accompanied by a number designating its degree of "development." The number six indicates an ideal level of development, anything lower being deficient. Seven, the highest possible score, was excessive. Here Taylor scores a seven in "Combativeness," but only receives a one for "Self Esteem." In "Firmness" he receives a fourteen, making him remarkably "Obstinate & Mulish." Shelved on the back wall at right are specimens of heads and skulls, including those of Martin Van Buren, James Watson Webb, Henry Clay, and a black man. Posted on the left is a sign advertising "Fowler & Wells. Phrenologists, 131 Nassau St. Clinton Hall, N. York."|Drawn by "W.J.C."|Entered . . . 1848 by H.R. Robinson.|Lithd. & published by H.R. Robinson-31 Park Row New York.|Title appears as it is written on the item.|Lorant, p. 19.|Weitenkampf, p. 93-94.|Forms part of: American cartoon print filing series (Library of Congress)|Published in: American political prints, 1766-1876 / Bernard F. Reilly. Boston : G.K. Hall, 1991, entry 1848-24.

Subject:
U.S. History
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Primary Source
Provider:
Library of Congress
Provider Set:
Library of Congress - Cartoons 1766-1876
Date Added:
06/08/2013
Candidates From The Exempt Brigade
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A grim commentary on the extraordinary measures taken by some Americans to evade military service during the Civil War. A man in shirtsleeves (center) has just had his right hand mutilated by a woman who stands at left, holding a hammer and knife. On a stump before the woman lies the man's severed index finger. "Oh Lord! Oh Lord! how it hurts," howls the man, as he dances about holding his bleeding hand. On the right, another man with an amputated finger extends his hand and reassures him, "Tˆü_ˆüąwont hurt but a minute and then you can get one of those." He refers to a certificate in his left hand, signed by "Dr. Syntax," certifying that "I have examined Adam Cowherd, Esq. and find that he has lost the first finger of his right hand. He affirms that it was cut off while digging post holes. I recommend that he be sent to the Army or to Fort Lafayette." During the Civil War, Fort Lafayette was used as a prison for political offenders.|Entered . . . 1862, by Wm. E.S. Trowbridge . . . Southern District of New York.|The Library's impression of the print was deposited for copyright on August 27, 1862.|Title appears as it is written on the item.|Wm. E.S. Trowbridge, del.|Forms part of: American cartoon print filing series (Library of Congress)|Published in: American political prints, 1766-1876 / Bernard F. Reilly. Boston : G.K. Hall, 1991, entry 1862-6.

Subject:
U.S. History
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Primary Source
Provider:
Library of Congress
Provider Set:
Library of Congress - Cartoons 1766-1876
Date Added:
06/08/2013