Keywords: Explanations (5)

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Ethnography, Spring 2003
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Ethnography, Spring 2003

A practicum-style course in anthropological methods of ethnographic fieldwork and writing, intended ... (more)

A practicum-style course in anthropological methods of ethnographic fieldwork and writing, intended especially for STS, CMS, HTC, and Sloan graduate students, but open to others with permission of instructor. Depending on student experience in ethnographic reading and practice, the subject is a mix of reading anthropological and science studies ethnographies; and formulating and pursuing ethnographic work in local labs, companies, or other sites. (less)

Subject:
Science and Technology
Social Sciences
Material Type:
Full Course
Homework and Assignments
Syllabi
Provider:
M.I.T.
Provider Set:
MIT OpenCourseWare
Author:
Dumit, Joseph
Facilitating Conceptual Learning Through Analogy And Explanation
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Facilitating Conceptual Learning Through Analogy And Explanation

Research in cognitive science has shown that students typically have a difficult ... (more)

Research in cognitive science has shown that students typically have a difficult time acquiring deep conceptual understanding in domains like mathematics and physics and often rely on textbook examples to solve new problems. The use of prior examples facilitates learning, but the advantage is often limited to very similar problems. One reason students rely so heavily on using prior examples is that they lack a deep understanding for how the principles are instantiated in the examples. We review and present research aimed at helping students learn the relations between principles and examples through generating explanations and making analogies. (less)

Subject:
Physics
Education
Material Type:
Reference
Provider:
ComPADRE Digital Library
Provider Set:
ComPADRE: Resources for Physics and Astronomy Education
Author:
Brian H. Ross
Timothy Nokes
Instructional explanations as an interface - The role of explanatory primitives
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Instructional explanations as an interface - The role of explanatory primitives

What makes an instructional sequence in physics meaningful to students? Why do ... (more)

What makes an instructional sequence in physics meaningful to students? Why do some explanations seem more plausible than others? Why is it that an explanation can appear plausible to one student but not to another? We present a model that addresses these questions. Elaborating diSessa’s (1993) concept of p-prims, we develop a model of explanatory primitives and argue that different individuals have different sets of explanatory primitives, or they assign different priorities to the same explanatory primitives. Individual differences in explanatory primitives can account for differences in reactions to an instructional explanation, and we present empirical data to support this claim. We then use the model to analyze Jim Minsrell’s (1982) instructional sequence about normal forces to illustrate how an effective learning sequence addresses differences between individuals by evoking a rich set of explanatory primitives. (less)

Subject:
Physics
Education
Material Type:
Reference
Provider:
ComPADRE Digital Library
Provider Set:
ComPADRE: Resources for Physics and Astronomy Education
Author:
Andrea A. diSessa
Shulamit Kapon
Jukes family members, by Arthur Estabrook, about 1910, still imageSite: DNA Interactive (www.dnai.org)
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Jukes family members, by Arthur Estabrook, about 1910, still imageSite: DNA Interactive (www.dnai.org)

DNAi location: Chronicle>Threat of the Unfit>epilogue In general, eugenicists were lax in ... (more)

DNAi location: Chronicle>Threat of the Unfit>epilogue In general, eugenicists were lax in defining the criteria for measuring many of the "traits" they studied, and they were too quick to force their data to fit into simple Mendelian templates. American eugenicists sought genetic explanations of human behavior to the almost total exclusion of environmental or social circumstances. Ominously, "pauperism" and "social dependency" were interpreted as genetic problems, rather than a financial ones. In retrospect, eugenicists' pedigrees of faulty genes are striking examples of lack of education and opportunity. (less)

Subject:
History, Law, Politics
Life Science
Social Sciences
Material Type:
Images and Illustrations
Provider:
BiosciEdNet (BEN): Digital Library Portal for Teaching and Learning in the Biological Sciences
Provider Set:
BiosciEdNet (BEN): Digital Library Portal for Teaching and Learning in the Biological Sciences
Author:
David Micklos (Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory;DNA Learning Center X-AUDIENCE)
Elof Carlson (SUNY at Stony Brook;Biology Department X-AUDIENCE)
Garland Allen (Washington University at St. Louis;Biology Department X-AUDIENCE)
Jan Witkowski (Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory;Banbury Center X-AUDIENCE)
Paul Lombardo (University of Virginia;Center for Biomedical Ethics X-AUDIENCE)
Steven Selden (University of Maryland;Education Policy and Leadership Department X-AUDIENCE)
Thalassophilia pedigree, 2D animationSite: DNA Interactive (www.dnai.org)
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Thalassophilia pedigree, 2D animationSite: DNA Interactive (www.dnai.org)

In general, eugenicists were lax in defining the criteria for measuring many ... (more)

In general, eugenicists were lax in defining the criteria for measuring many of the "traits" they studied, and they were too quick to force their data to fit into simple Mendelian templates. American eugenicists sought genetic explanations of human behavior to the almost total exclusion of environmental or social circumstances. Thus, Davenport amusingly concluded that naval captains were influenced by a gene for "thalassophilia" (love of the sea), rather than childhoods spent around ships. 퉌ë퀌_More ominously, "pauperism" and "social dependency" were interpreted as genetic problems, rather than a financial ones. 퉌ë퀌_In retrospect, eugenicists' pedigrees of faulty genes are striking examples of lack of education and opportunity. (less)

Subject:
History, Law, Politics
Life Science
Social Sciences
Material Type:
Instructional Material
Readings
Provider:
BiosciEdNet (BEN): Digital Library Portal for Teaching and Learning in the Biological Sciences
Provider Set:
BiosciEdNet (BEN): Digital Library Portal for Teaching and Learning in the Biological Sciences
Author:
David Micklos (Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory;DNA Learning Center X-AUDIENCE)
Elof Carlson (SUNY at Stony Brook;Biology Department X-AUDIENCE)
Garland Allen (Washington University at St. Louis;Biology Department X-AUDIENCE)
Jan Witkowski (Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory;Banbury Center X-AUDIENCE)
Paul Lombardo (University of Virginia;Center for Biomedical Ethics X-AUDIENCE)
Steven Selden (University of Maryland;Education Policy and Leadership Department X-AUDIENCE)
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2002 llaF ,gnivloS melborP gnireenignE dna sretupmoC ot noitcudortnI

.desu si egaugnal gnimmargorp avaJ ehT .gninnalp dna ,tnemeganam ,ecneics ,gnireenigne ni ... (more)

.desu si egaugnal gnimmargorp avaJ ehT .gninnalp dna ,tnemeganam ,ecneics ,gnireenigne ni smelborp gnivlos rof seuqinhcet gnipoleved no si sisahpmE .scipot decnavda detceles dna scihparg retupmoc ,gnihcraes dna gnitros ,serutcurts atad ,sdohtem laciremun ,secafretni resu lacihparg ,stpecnoc gnimmargorp revoc smelborp gnimmargorp ylkeeW .esruoc eht fo sucof eht si tnempoleved dna ngised erawtfos detneiro-tcejbO .snoitacilppa cifitneics dna gnireenigne rof sdohtem lanoitatupmoc dna tnempoleved erawtfos latnemadnuf stneserp esruoc sihT (less)