All resources in Trinity International University

Intermediate Biblical Greek Reader: Galatians and Related Texts

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After completing basic biblical Greek, students are often eager to continue to learn and strengthen their skills of translation and interpretation. This intermediate graded reader is designed to meet those needs. The reader is “intermediate” in the sense that it presumes the user will have already learned the basics of Greek grammar and syntax and has memorized Greek vocabulary words that appear frequently in the New Testament. The reader is “graded” in the sense that it moves from simpler translation work (Galatians) towards more advanced readings from the book of James, the Septuagint, and from one of the Church Fathers. In each reading lesson, the Greek text is given, followed by supplemental notes that offer help with vocabulary, challenging word forms, and syntax. Discussion questions are also included to foster group conversation and engagement. There are many good Greek readers in existence, but this reader differs from most others in a few important ways. Most readers offer text selections from different parts of the Bible, but in this reader the user works through one entire book (Galatians). All subsequent lessons, then, build off of this interaction with Galatians through short readings that are in some way related to Galatians. The Septuagint passages in the reader offer some broader context for texts that Paul quotes explicitly from the Septuagint. The Patristic reading from John Chrysystom comes from one of his homilies on Galatians. This approach to a Greek reader allows for both variety and coherence in the learning process.

Material Type: Textbook

Authors: Jonah M. Sandford, Nijay K. Gupta

Elementary New Testament Greek

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The need for this particular grammar arises from the peculiar shape of the MDiv curriculum at Asbury Theological Seminary. Several years ago the faculty adopted a curriculum that required one semester of Greek and one semester of Hebrew, each as preparatory for a basic exegesis course in each discipline. It became clear after several years of trial and error that a “lexical” or “tools” approach to learning Greek and Hebrew was inadequate, no matter how skilled the instructors or how motivated the students. In today's general vacuum of grammatical training in public education across the United States, students typically enter seminary training with no knowledge of how languages work. Any training we might give them in accessing grammatical information through the use of Bible software programs will, we learned, come to naught in the absence of an understanding of just what such information actually means. We agreed that we actually needed to “teach the language itself,” at least in some rudimentary fashion, if we hoped students would make sense of grammatical and linguistic issues involved biblical interpretation. The first 12 chapters of this grammar are designed to correspond to the first semester's instructional agenda. In these chapters we introduce all the parts of speech, explain and drill the basic elements of grammar, set forth the larger verb system (excluding the perfect system), teach the tenses of the Indicative Mood only (again, excluding the perfect system), and help students build a vocabulary of all NT words occurring 100 times or more. We also lead students into the NT itself with carefully chosen examples, while at the same time guiding them in each lesson to learn the use of the standard NT lexicon [BDAG] and an exegetical grammar [Wallace's Greek Grammar Beyond the Basics]. We are well aware of the limitations of this approach, but genuinely believe that some instruction along these lines is better than none, and that such an approach provide a foundation for students interested in moving beyond the first semester (into chapters 13-24) into a firmer grasp of the language of the NT.

Material Type: Textbook

Author: Joseph R. Dongell

Allen Institute: Mitosis and Microscopy

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The content of the lesson reinforces existing knowledge of mitosis, helps students transition from looking at drawn images or plant cells (such as in the classic onion cell mitosis experiment) to high resolution microscopy data, and introduces open research questions in the field of cell biology. Students also have the opportunity to explore what happens to cell structures that are not directly related to chromosome reproduction during the process of mitosis and cytokinesis. The data used in the virtual experiment portion of this unit come from the Allen Cell Explorer, an open data set featuring tens of thousands of research-grade cell images. Students will learn about one kind of data collected in research settings and begin learning how it can be used. The Allen Institute is a biological sciences nonprofit located in Seattle, WA, with focus research areas in neuroscience, cell biology, and immunology. The Institute shares all of its data and analysis tools freely with the scientific community. In addition to the research applications, educators can use the open data and tools to provide real-world and cutting-edge science experiences for their students. Because the Allen Institute shares all of its data openly, students are able to conduct virtual labs and independent research right in their browsers and generate new scientific insights. Educator resources are geared towards instructors at the high school and college level. Explore virtual events for educators and for students, turnkey virtual labs, and more. All resources and virtual events are free. Additional educator resources are available at alleninstitute.org/learn.

Material Type: Activity/Lab, Data Set, Homework/Assignment, Interactive, Lesson Plan, Unit of Study

Author: Allen Instutute

Allen Institute: The Building Blocks of the Brain

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The content of this lesson develops the link between gene expression, explores the functions and specialization of various brain regions, and compares studies of the brain at the level of genes, neurons, and regions. It also introduces open research questions in the world of neuroscience. Students are guided through a data set that is under active development and are encouraged to consider current and future research. The datasets used in the virtual experiment portion of this unit comes from Allen Brain Map, a group of open datasets encompassing gene expression in the brain, visual behavior, properties of neurons, neural development, and more. Students will learn what kind of data is collected in research settings and begin learning how it can be used. The Allen Institute is a biological sciences nonprofit located in Seattle, WA, with focus research areas in neuroscience, cell biology, and immunology. The Institute shares all of its data and analysis tools freely with the scientific community. In addition to the research applications, educators can use the open data and tools to provide real-world and cutting-edge science experiences for their students. Because the Allen Institute shares all of its data openly, students are able to conduct virtual labs and independent research right in their browsers and generate new scientific insights. Educator resources are geared towards instructors at the high school and college level. Explore virtual events for educators and for students, turnkey virtual labs, and more. All resources and virtual events are free. Additional educator resources are available at alleninstitute.org/learn.

Material Type: Activity/Lab, Data Set, Homework/Assignment, Lesson Plan, Primary Source, Unit of Study

Author: Allen Institute

Anatomy and Physiology I Lecture

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This course is the first part of the two semester course of Anatomy and Physiology. It integrates the anatomy and physiology of cells, tissues, organs and human body systems, It includes the study of the gross and microscopic structure of the systems of the human body with special emphasis on the relationship between structure and function. It is based on OpenStax Anatomy and Physiology book and is supplemented by content from the Open Learning Initiative (Carnegie Mellon University Open Learning Initative) and Boundless Physiology Open Book.

Material Type: Full Course

Author: Judyta Juranek