All resources in Lincoln University

Farmer's Agribusiness Training Course: Module 4 - ICT in Support of Farming. Lesson 3 : Record Keeping II

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This Farmers' Agribusiness training course has been developed to help both farmers and farmer organisations. Its intention is to provide access to provide access to additional skills and knowledge that will allow farmers to move from a 'farm' to a 'firm'. This lesson provides information on what farming activities could be considered 'Enterprises' and incorporated into an Enterprise Accounting spreadsheet, how to use functions to calculate totals and averages within the spreadsheet program, customise formula using a spreadsheet program and how to customise the Enterprise accounting template.

Material Type: Textbook

Author: Moore, Andrew

Introduction to Permaculture

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Permaculture Design is a method of land planning that can be applied at scales from the home garden to city block to village to farm. It is an ethically based whole-systems design approach that uses concepts, principles, and methods derived from ecosystems, indigenous technologies, and other time-tested practices to create sustainable human settlements and institutions. Although rooted in horticulture and agriculture, Permaculture design is interdisciplinary, touching on a wide range of subjects including regional planning, ecology, animal husbandry, appropriate technology, architecture, social justice, and international development. This open text book is derived from the content of the Massive Open Online Course “Intro to Permaculture”. The original course also included interactive mapping and design tools that accompanied this content. The course and book provide a general overview of the Permaculture design system. The book can be downloaded as a print version. However, there are many accompanying videos and content pages that are linked to throughout the text, so it is best viewed online where the links can be accessed.

Material Type: Textbook

Author: Andrew Millison

Art Appreciation and Techniques

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This course is an exploration of visual art forms and their cultural connections for the student with little experience in the visual arts. It includes a brief study of art history and in depth studies of the elements, media, and methods used in creative processes and thought. Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to: interpret examples of visual art using a five-step critical process that includes description, analysis, context, meaning, and judgment; identify and describe the elements and principles of art; use analytical skills to connect formal attributes of art with their meaning and expression; explain the role and effect of the visual arts in societies, history, and other world cultures; articulate the political, social, cultural, and aesthetic themes and issues that artists examine in their work; identify the processes and materials involved in art and architectural production; utilize information to locate, evaluate, and communicate information about visual art in its various forms. Note that this course is an alternative to the Saylor FoundationĺÎĺ_ĺĚĺ_s ARTH101A and has been developed through a partnership with the Washington State Board for Community and Technical Colleges; the Saylor Foundation has modified some WSBCTC materials. This free course may be completed online at any time. (Art History 101B)

Material Type: Assessment, Full Course, Homework/Assignment, Reading, Syllabus

Art History

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The history of Art is long and varied, spanning tens of thousands of years from ancient paintings on the walls of caves to the glow of computer-generated images on the screens of the 21st century.

Material Type: Textbook

Microbiology

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Microbiology covers the scope and sequence requirements for a single-semester microbiology course for non-majors. The book presents the core concepts of microbiology with a focus on applications for careers in allied health. The pedagogical features of the text make the material interesting and accessible while maintaining the career-application focus and scientific rigor inherent in the subject matter. Microbiology’s art program enhances students’ understanding of concepts through clear and effective illustrations, diagrams, and photographs.

Material Type: Textbook

Authors: Anh-Hue Thi Tu, Ann Auman, Ann Paterson, Ben Rowley, Brian M. Forster, Clifton Franklund, George Pinchuk, Graciela Brelles-Mariño, Mark Schneegurt, Mark Sutherland, Myriam Alhadeff Feldman, Nina Parker, Paul Flowers, Philip Lister, Summer Allen

Concepts of Biology

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Concepts of Biology is designed for the introductory biology course for nonmajors taught at most two- and four-year colleges. The scope, sequence, and level of the program are designed to match typical course syllabi in the market. Concepts of Biology includes interesting applications, features a rich art program, and conveys the major themes of biology.

Material Type: Textbook

Authors: James Wise, Rebecca Roush, Samantha Fowler

Global Perspectives on Industrialization

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This course will focus on the emergence and evolution of industrial societies around the world. The student will begin by comparing the legacies of industry in ancient and early modern Europe and Asia and examining the agricultural and commercial advances that laid the groundwork for the Industrial Revolution. The student will then follow the history of industrialization in different parts of the world, taking a close look at the economic, social, and environmental effects of industrialization. This course ultimately examines how industrialization developed, spread across the globe, and shaped everyday life in the modern era. Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to: identify key ideas and events in the history of industrialization; identify connections between the development of capitalism and the development of modern industry; use analytical tools to evaluate the factors contributing to industrial change in different societies; identify the consequences of industrialization in the 19th and 20th centuries in different societies; critique historical interpretations of the causes and effects of industrialization; and analyze and interpret primary source documents describing the process of industrialization and life in industrial societies. (History 363)

Material Type: Assessment, Full Course, Lecture, Lecture Notes, Reading, Syllabus, Textbook

Principles of Economics

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Principles of Economics covers scope and sequence requirements for a two-semester introductory economics course. The authors take a balanced approach to micro- and macroeconomics, to both Keynesian and classical views, and to the theory and application of economics concepts. The text also includes many current examples, which are handled in a politically equitable way.

Material Type: Textbook

Authors: Amyaz Moledina, Andres Jauregui, Craig Richardson, Cynthia Gamez, Dan MacDonald, David Shapiro, Diane Keenan, Eric Dodge, Ralph Sonenshine, Steven Greenlaw, Timothy Taylor

Principles of Macroeconomics 2e

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Principles of Macroeconomics covers the scope and sequence requirements of most introductory macroeconomics courses. The text also includes many current examples, which are handled in a politically equitable way. The outcome is a balanced approach to both Keynesian and classical views, and to the theory and application of economics concepts.

Material Type: Textbook

Authors: Amyaz Moledina, Andres Jauregui, Craig Richardson, Cynthia Gamez, Dan MacDonald, David Shapiro, Diane Keenan, Eric Dodge, Ralph Sonenshine, Steven Greenlaw, Timothy Taylor

Principles of Microeconomics 2e

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Principles of Microeconomics covers the scope and sequence of most introductory microeconomics courses. The text includes many current examples, which are handled in a politically equitable way. The outcome is a balanced approach to the theory and application of economics concepts.

Material Type: Textbook

Authors: Amyaz Moledina, Andres Jauregui, Craig Richardson, Cynthia Gamez, Dan MacDonald, David Shapiro, Diane Keenan, Eric Dodge, Ralph Sonenshine, Steven Greenlaw, Timothy Taylor

Chemistry

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Chemistry is designed to meet the scope and sequence requirements of the two-semester general chemistry course. The textbook provides an important opportunity for students to learn the core concepts of chemistry and understand how those concepts apply to their lives and the world around them. The book also includes a number of innovative features, including interactive exercises and real-world applications, designed to enhance student learning.

Material Type: Textbook

Authors: Allison Soult, Andrew Eklund, Carol Martinez, Don Carpenetti, Don Frantz, Emad El-Giar, George Kaminski, Jason Powell, Jennifer Look, Klaus Theopold, Mark Blaser, Paul Flowers, Paul Hooker, Richard Langley, Simon Bott, Tom Sorensen, Troy Milliken, Vicki Moravec, William R. Robinson

Chemistry: Atoms First

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Chemistry: Atoms First is a peer-reviewed, openly licensed introductory textbook produced through a collaborative publishing partnership between OpenStax and the University of Connecticut and UConn Undergraduate Student Government Association. This title is an adaptation of the OpenStax Chemistry text and covers scope and sequence requirements of the two-semester general chemistry course. Reordered to fit an atoms first approach, this title introduces atomic and molecular structure much earlier than the traditional approach, delaying the introduction of more abstract material so students have time to acclimate to the study of chemistry. Chemistry: Atoms First also provides a basis for understanding the application of quantitative principles to the chemistry that underlies the entire course.

Material Type: Textbook

Authors: Allison Soult, Andrew Eklund, Carol Martinez, Donald Carpenetti, Don Frantz, Edward J. Neth, Emad El-Giar, George Kaminski, Jason Powell, Jennifer Look, Klaus Theopold, Mark Blaser, Paul Flowers, Paul Hooker, Richard Langley, Simon Bott, Thomas Sorenson, Troy Milliken, Vicki Moravec, William R. Robinson

Theory of Computation

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Computability Theory deals with one of the most fundamental questions in computer science: What is computing and what are the limits of what a computer can compute? Or, formulated differently: ‰"What kind of problems can be algorithmically solved?‰" During the course this question will be studied. Firstly, the notion of algorithm or computing will be made precise by using the mathematical model of a Turing machine. Secondly, it will be shown that basic issues in computer science, like "Given a program P does it halt for any input x?" or "Given two program P and Q, are they equivalent?" cannot be solved by any Turing machine. This shows that there exist problems that are impossible to solve with a computer, the so-called "undecidable problems".

Material Type: Full Course, Lecture, Lecture Notes, Reading

Author: J.F.M. Tonino

Computer Architecture

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The purpose of this course is to cultivate an understanding of modern computing technology through an in-depth study of the interface between hardware and software. The student will study the history of modern computing technology before learning about modern computer architecture, then the recent switch from sequential processing to parallel processing. Upon completion of this course, students will be able to: identify important advances that have taken place in the history of modern computing and discuss some of the latest trends in computing industry; explain how programs written in high-level programming language, such as C or Java, can be translated into the language of the hardware; describe the interface between hardware and software and explain how software instructs hardware to accomplish desired functions; demonstrate an understanding of the process of carrying out sequential logic design; demonstrate an understanding of computer arithmetic hardware blocks and floating point representation; explain how a hardware programming language is executed on hardware and how hardware and software design affect performance; demonstrate an understanding of the factors that determine the performance of a program; demonstrate an understanding of the techniques that designers use to improve the performance of programs running on hardware; demonstrate an understanding of the importance of memory hierarchy in computer design and explain how memory design impacts overall hardware performance; demonstrate an understanding of storage and I/O devices, their performance measurement, and redundant array of inexpensive disks (more commonly referred to by the acronym RAID) technology; list the reasons for and the consequences of the recent switch from sequential processing to parallel processing in hardware manufacture and explain the basics of parallel programming. (Computer Science 301)

Material Type: Full Course

Computer Communications and Networks

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Detailed introduction to the basic hardware and software, architectural components for computer communications in local area networks. The components that are focused upon include understanding the basics of computer networks, switching, routing, protocols and security.

Material Type: Full Course

Criminal Justice: An Overview of the System

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This book provides an overview of the criminal justice system of the United States. It is intended to provide the introductory student a concise yet balanced introduction to the workings of the legal system as well as policing, courts, corrections, and juvenile justice. Six chapters, each divided into five sections, provide the reader a consistent, comfortable format as well as providing the instructor with a consistent framework for ease of instructional design.

Material Type: Reading, Textbook

OpenEDUC: Investigating Critical and Contemporary Issues in Education

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Included are open-source reading materials, learning objectives, suggested readings and resources, and activities organized into content modules for undergraduate Foundations of Education courses. The specific course included here is EDUC 2110: Investigating Critical and Contemporary Issues in Education.

Material Type: Textbook

Authors: Amy Ingalls, Brian Dotts, Deanna Cozart, James Castle, James Gurney, Tanya Walker