All resources in Hawaii ELA Common Core

Common Core Curriculum Grade 3 (Module 1): Becoming a Close Reader and Writing to Learn - My Librarian Is a Camel: Bringing Books to Children around the World

(View Complete Item Description)

This module uses literature and informational text such as "My Librarian Is a Camel" to introduce students to the power of literacy and how people around the world access books. This module is intentionally designed to encourage students to embrace a love of literacy and reading. There are 3 units in this module. Unit 1 explores the question ĺづWhy do people seek the power of reading?ĺăĺ In unit 2 students explore their own ĺづpowers of readingĺăĺ that help them access text. And unit 3 explores how geography impacts readersĺăĚă access to books.

Material Type: Lesson Plan, Reading, Teaching/Learning Strategy, Unit of Study

Common Core Curriculum Grade 4 Module 1 Overview: Becoming a Close Reader and Writing to Learn - Native Americans in New York

(View Complete Item Description)

This module ensures that students read, write, listen and speak to learn the history and contributions of Native Americans in New York State, particularly the Iroquois Confederacy. It focuses on reading and listening to primary and secondary sources to gather specific details and determine central ideas, and to reinforce reading fluency and paragraph writing. Students will read literature to develop an understanding of setting, characterization and theme, and informational writing.

Material Type: Lesson Plan, Teaching/Learning Strategy, Unit of Study

Grade 4 ELA Module 2A

(View Complete Item Description)

Students learn about what life was like in Colonial America. They go on to study the many roles people played in a colonial settlement and how necessary their interdependence was for survival. Students select one role to explore more deeply through various forms of nonfiction texts. With an emphasis on making inferences, summarizing informational text, basic research (note-taking and pulling together information from a variety of texts), this module will foster students’ abilities to synthesize information from multiple sources and integrate research into their writing. At the end of the module, students participate in several critique experiences during the revision process as they write a research-based narrative that vividly describes an event in a colonist’s life.

Material Type: Module

Lessons about Making Predictions with Informational Text

(View Complete Item Description)

Making predictions is a skill readers need for comprehending fiction and nonfiction. Three lessons are identified here to give young readers opportunities to make predictions about nonfiction text found in print or on web pages. The lessons are aligned with the national standards for English language arts. The article appears in the free, online magazine that focuses on the seven essential principles of climate literacy.

Material Type: Activity/Lab, Lesson Plan, Reading, Teaching/Learning Strategy

Authors: Jessica Fries-Gaither, National Science Foundation

Lessons about Asking, Answering Questions

(View Complete Item Description)

Using the web-based lessons highlighted in this article, students learn how to pose questions before, during, and after reading nonfiction, fiction, and diagrams. This reading comprehension strategy is included in the literacy column of the magazine Beyond Weather and the Water Cycle, a free, online publication for K-5 teachers.

Material Type: Lesson Plan, Teaching/Learning Strategy

Authors: Jessica Fries-Gaither, National Science Foundation

Cultural Snapshots of Daily Life in Japan for Elementary Students

(View Complete Item Description)

Sushi, anime, Hello Kitty Đ these are a few of the most well-known products that have become symbolic of Japan. However, sushi is a delicacy and therefore not something that most Japanese eat daily, the popularity of anime varies across the country, and not everyone is a zealous Hello Kitty fan. The purpose of these activities, then, is to go beyond the stereotypes often associated with these popular products and examine aspects of Japanese culture that reveal fundamental values in Japanese society. Specifically, the primary sources chosen here all reflect careful attention to detail and presentation as well as efficient, thoughtful, and creative use of limited time and space. The classroom activities that go along with the primary sources have been designed to help young students recognize similarities and differences between Japanese culture and their own.

Material Type: Lecture, Lesson Plan, Reading, Teaching/Learning Strategy

Authors: Ann Marie Gleeson, Lina Yamashita, Mika Fukutomi

Grade 3 ELA Module 2A

(View Complete Item Description)

In this module, students will use literacy skills to become experts— people who use reading, writing, listening and speaking to build and share deep knowledge about a topic. (This focus on research intentionally builds Module 1, in which students explored the superpowers of reading.) The module will begin with a class study of the bullfrog, an example of a “true frog,” that exhibit quintessentially froggy characteristics. In Unit 2, students will form research groups to become experts on various “freaky” frogs—frogs that push the boundaries of “froginess” with unusual adaptations that help them to survive in extreme environments throughout the world. Students will build their reading, research, writing and collaborative discussion skills through studying their expert frog. Throughout the module, students will consistently reflect on the role of literacy in building and sharing expertise. Students will demonstrate their expertise through a “freaky frog trading card”—a research-based narrative that highlights their research and educates others about the amazing diversity of frogs with a focus on how their freaky frog survives.

Material Type: Module

The Frog Prince - Compare and Contrast

(View Complete Item Description)

This lesson can be used with numerous pieces of literature, videos or cassette material to develop viewing and listening skills and the students ability to compare and contrast. One of the richest sources is in the area of fairytales and folktales. This an especially good source if you can find a modernized version in video or cassette form to contrast with the more traditional written form. I have used the "Frog Prince" because of this factor and because it was part of the 4th grade language arts reading unit.

Material Type: Lesson Plan

Author: Barbara Waters

Grade 5 ELA Module 2A

(View Complete Item Description)

This module—intended to be used in conjunction with a Social Studies unit about Latin America—features a close read of The Most Beautiful Roof in the World (1160L)* by Kathryn Lasky. This beautifully illustrated informational text describes the work of scientists documenting the biodiversity of rainforests. The specific literacy focus is on reading scientific and technical text as well as writing to inform and explain. In the first unit, students build basic background knowledge about the rainforest (particularly those of the Western Hemisphere), and begin to examine how scientists closely observe the natural world to then help them communicate their research through carefully organized and worded scientific text. Unit 2 focuses on a case study of Meg Lowman, the researcher featured in The Most Beautiful Roof in the World. Students then analyze the structure and function of scientific field guides and filed journals determining what quality field guides and journals look and sound like. Students research about a living thing that scientist Meg Lowman may encounter in the rainforest in her research and write with clear and effective word choice about their chosen insect of the rainforest. As the final performance task, students produce an informational report and then field journal–style pages intended for younger readers.

Material Type: Module

Grade 5 ELA Module 3A

(View Complete Item Description)

This module begins with a brief study of the importance of sports in American culture over time. The heart of this module is a whole class study of the short but challenging biography Promises to Keep: How Jackie Robinson Changed America (1030L) by his daughter, Sharon Robinson. (Students will read selected segments; some of these will be read aloud.) Students will analyze Jackie Robinson as a specific example of an athlete who served as a leader who broke barriers in society. They will also begin to study argumentative writing, analyzing how the author Sharon Robinson provides evidence to support her opinions. In Unit 3, students then choose to learn about one of three other respected sports figures (Roberto Clemente, Babe Didrikson, or Jim Thorpe). Students will develop their understanding of the cultural context in which these athletes competed and the barriers these athletes broke during the times in which they lived. Students will build their research skills by reading biographical articles and other informational texts and by participating in Webquests. They also will continue to build their skills to write arguments based on multiple sources, focusing on crafting clear opinions and providing sufficient reasons and evidence. For the final performance task, each student will write a letter to a publishing company explaining the need for a biography about their selected athlete, in which they discuss the athlete, evaluate the barriers that he/she broke during the era in which he/she lived, and give an opinion about the importance of that athlete’s impact on American society. They must support their opinions with evidence from their research.

Material Type: Module

Grade 5 ELA Module 1

(View Complete Item Description)

What are human rights, and how do real people and fictional characters respond when those rights are challenged? Students will develop their ability to read and understand complex text as they consider this question. Students will begin to build knowledge about human rights through a close read of the introduction and selected articles of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights (UDHR), paired with short firsthand accounts of people around the world who currently face human rights challenges. In Unit 2, students will do an extended study of Esperanza Rising (740L) by Pam Muñoz Ryan, applying their new learning about human rights as one lens through which to interpret the character and theme in this rich novel—a complex coming-of-age story set in Mexico and rural California during the early 1930s. Through close reading, interpretation, and analysis of fiction and nonfiction texts, students will synthesize their understanding of human rights. The specific literacy focus is on supporting understanding through quoting directly from text, inferring theme, and comparing and contrasting how different texts address the topics and themes of human rights. Students will write an analytical essay in which they describe how a character in the novel responds to challenges. In Unit 3, students will continue to revisit the text and themes of the UDHR and Esperanza Rising as they read, write, and ultimately perform Readers Theater. Students will compare novels and Readers Theater as two forms of narrative writing. They will then select specific articles of the UDHR that relate thematically to the novel and reread key passages of the novel with that theme in mind. They will write individual and small group scripts based on these key passages and on phrases from the UDHR. Students will revise, rehearse, and ultimately perform their group Readers Theater scripts for their class and/or school or community members.

Material Type: Module

Grade 6 ELA Module 1

(View Complete Item Description)

In this module, students are involved in a deep study of mythology, its purposes, and elements. Students will read Rick Riordan’s The Lightning Thief (780L), a high-interest novel about a sixth-grade boy on a hero’s journey. Some students may be familiar with this popular fantasy book; in this module, students will read with a focus on the archetypal journey and close reading of the many mythical allusions. As they begin the novel, students also will read a complex informational text that explains the archetypal storyline of the hero’s journey which has been repeated in literature throughout the centuries. Through the close reading of literary and informational texts, students will learn multiple strategies for acquiring and using academic vocabulary. Students will also build routines and expectations of discussion as they work in small groups. At the end of Unit 1, having read half of the novel, students will explain, with text-based evidence, how Percy is an archetypal hero. In Unit 2, students will continue reading The Lightning Thief (more independently): in class, they will focus on the novel’s many allusions to classic myths; those allusions will serve as an entry point into a deeper study of Greek mythology. They also will continue to build their informational reading skills through the close reading of texts about the close reading of texts about the elements of myths. This will create a conceptual framework to support students’ reading of mythology. As a whole class, students will closely read several complex Greek myths. They then will work in small groups to build expertise on one of those myths. In Unit 3, students shift their focus to narrative writing skills. This series of writing lessons will scaffold students to their final performance task in which they will apply their knowledge about the hero’s journey and the elements of mythology to create their own hero’s journey stories.

Material Type: Module

Common Core Curriculum Grade 6 ELA - Making Evidence-Based Claims

(View Complete Item Description)

Making Evidence-Based Claims ELA/Literacy Units empower students with a critical reading and writing skill at the heart of the Common Core: making evidence-based claims about complex texts. These units are part of the Developing Core Proficiencies Program. This unit develops students' €abilities to make evidence-based claims through activities based on a close reading of the Commencement Address Steve Jobs delivered at Stanford University on June, 2005.

Material Type: Primary Source, Reading, Teaching/Learning Strategy, Unit of Study

Grade 7 ELA Module 1

(View Complete Item Description)

In this 8 eight-week module, students explore the experiences of people of Southern Sudan during and after the Second Sudanese Civil War. They build proficiency in using textual evidence to support ideas in their writing, both in shorter responses and in an extended essay. In Unit 1, students begin the novel A Long Walk to Water (720L) by Linda Sue Park. Students will read closely to practice citing evidence and drawing inferences from this compelling text as they begin to analyze and contrast the points of view of the two central characters, Salva and Nya. They also will read informational text to gather evidence on the perspectives of the Dinka and Nuer tribes of Southern Sudan. In Unit 2, students will read the remainder of the novel, focusing on the commonalities between Salva and Nya in relation to the novel’s theme: how individuals survive in challenging environments. (The main characters’ journeys are fraught with challenges imposed by the environment, including the lack of safe drinking water, threats posed by animals, and the constant scarcity of food. They are also challenged by political and social environments.). As in Unit 1, students will read this literature closely alongside complex informational texts (focusing on background on Sudan and factual accounts of the experiences of refugees from the Second Sudanese Civil War). Unit 2 culminates with a literary analysis essay about the theme of survival. Unit 3 brings students back to a deep exploration of character and point of view: students will combine their research about Sudan with specific quotes from A Long Walk to Water as they craft a two-voice poem, comparing and contrasting the points of view of the two main characters, Salva and Nya,. The two-voice poem gives students an opportunity to use both their analysis of the characters and theme in the novel and their research about the experiences of the people of Southern Sudan during the Second Sudanese Civil War.

Material Type: Module

Living the Revolution, America 1789-1820: Primary Sources

(View Complete Item Description)

The National Humanities center presents reading guides with primary source materials for the study of America 1789-1820: Living the Revolution. Primary source materials include autobiographies, plays, essays, orations, addresses, political documents, letters, poems, cartoons, and more. Resources are divided into the topics: Predicament, Religion, Politics, Expansion, and Equality.

Material Type: Diagram/Illustration, Reading