Author:
Cherie Johnson
Subject:
Languages, Language Education (ESL), English Language Arts, Language, Grammar and Vocabulary
Material Type:
Homework/Assignment
Level:
Middle School, High School
Tags:
NE ELA
License:
Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial Share Alike
Language:
English

Education Standards

Are we through with prepositional phrases?

Are we through with prepositional phrases?

Overview

The ability to identify prepositional phrases strengthens a writer's ability to write and punctuate complete, grammatically sound sentences.

This plan has been created by Cherie J. Johnson for the purpose of helping middle school students on their way to becoming clean, clear, fluent writers. This material was put together while participating in the workshop- Nebraska’s OER Common’s Hub for ELA & Reading; July 22-24, 2020. 

Overview

Middle School scholars should be able to find prepositional phrases in writing.

Who cares. Who cares? Why?

Prepositional phrases add information to a sentence, but they are not the foundation of the sentence. The best way to check if a sentence is grammatically sound is to find prepostional phrases and throw them out; subjects and predicates are not in the prepositional phrases. What you should have left, after tossing the prep phrases, is the foundational clauses of the sentence containing the subjects and predicates.

The ability to identify prepositional phrases strengthens a writer's ability to write and punctuate complete, grammatically sound sentences.

This plan has been created by Cherie J. Johnson for the purpose of helping middle school students on their way to becoming clean, clear, fluent writers. This material was put together while participating in the workshop- Nebraska’s OER Common’s Hub for ELA & Reading; July 22-24, 2020. 

Nebraska State Standards

LA 7.2.1.h Proofread and edit writing recursively for format and conventions of standard English (e.g., spelling, capitalization, grammar, punctuation, syntax, semantics).

Goal

I use a hard copy notebook with my 7th grade students. It is divided into 4 sections: writing notes, writing vocabulary, reading notes, reading vocabulary. Each time we have a new goal/objective they date and then write out the goal. Research supports the value of students using actual paper and pencil/pen for learning.

Here are some FYI links:

 https://www.timeshighereducation.com/news/pen-and-paper-beats-computers-retaining-knowledge

http://www.ascd.org/publications/educational-leadership/apr18/vol75/num07/The-Magic-of-Writing-Stuff-Down.aspx

This explanation of why learn about prepositional phrases is wordy. It is a lot for 7th grade scholars to write all at once and not throw their pencils at their instructors in rebellion! So this is one of those rare occasions where an organizer or fill in the blank work sheet might be of help. This hard copy should be given out and then put in their notebook. If learning through and electronic platform is happening the student could print their own hard copy if possible.

Goal- lesson's goal or objective

Goal- Scholars will be able to (SWBAT) find and craft prepositional phrases.

Who cares. Who cares? Why?

Prepositional phrases add information to a sentence, but they are not the foundation of the sentence. The best way to check if a sentence is grammatically sound is to find prepostional phrases and throw them out; subjects and predicates will not be in the prepositional phrases. What you should have left, after you toss the prep phrases, is the foundational clauses of the sentence containing the subjects and predicates. The ability to identify prepositional phrases strengthens a writer's ability to write and punctuate complete, grammatically sound sentences.

This document can be printed and used for fill in the blank style notes on the goal of this lesson. Complete and place in notebook.

https://docs.google.com/document/d/1ZEpBN56vNlK2QJQkzF47Nh7MNHOG6FrRmsHRaN2Ftaw/edit#

 

 

Apply prior knowledge.

This is your anticipatory set. the wroithing in their notebooks and sharing with their neighbor gets the brain moving. 

Subject and predicate are the two foundational pieces a complete sentence needs.

We would have covered this before tackling prepositional phrases.

Write today's date and learning goal in your notebook.

What are the two foundational parts of language that are required for a complete sentence? 

1. Use your resources (neighbor/notebook) to answer this question.

2. Write the question and answer in your notebook and share when called.

3. Check your neighbor to see if they have completed this.

New knowledge

This section of new knowledge could be copied and pasted and turned into fill in the blank style notes. However, having done that once already, I would not want to do again unless very necessary.

Prepositional phrases

Write in your notebooks-

1. Prepositions (prep) communicate-

  •          location             Ex: against, in, on
  •          time                   Ex: at, during
  •          direction            Ex: towards, through, up, down

         

2. "A preposition relates the noun or pronoun following it to another word in the sentence." 

https://www.houstonisd.org/cms/lib2/TX01001591/Centricity/Domain/26063/Prepositions%20-%20Prepositional%20Phrases%20-%20Study%20Guide-1.pdf

3. A prep is always the first word in a prep phrase.

4. The noun that follows the prep is the end of the prep phrase and is called the object of the phrase.

5. The subject and predicate (verb) of a clause/sentence is never in the prep phrase.

6. http://onin.com/stuff/preposition_bingo.pdf- copy these into your notebook.

Apply new knowledge

E). Have students share their sentences. Call on students at random using what ever system you choose for your classroom. This is a great check for understanding.

F). Give the students time to complete this.They can work alone or with their neighbor, then do it together as a group. This is a great check for understanding.

 

A). Write a prep phrase for each of the 50 prepositions; write them in your notebook.

Example

  •       around- around the bend
  •       of- of you
  •       towards- towards the boat dock

B). Working with your neighbor, write their prep phrase for each of these prepositions in your notebook.

C). For each of the prep phrases in your notebook, highlight the preposition and underline the object of the prep phrase. (I cannot highlight within this platform, so I will bold instead.)

Example

                     yours                                                            your neighbor's

  •       around-        around the bend                           around the stroke
  •       of-                of you                                            of midnight
  •       towards-      towards the boat dock                  towards the yummy bakery

 

D). As a class, stand up. Your teacher will sing along with the recording, Over The River And Through The Woods To Grandmother's House We Go. At each preposition, dip your knees.

The following link you may need to copy and paste into the search bar to pull up the recording.

    file:///Users/cjohnson/Downloads/70c9ce4e-9a33-4cff-8cc8-e721fe865356%20(1).ogg

I wish I had a video of every class that tries this! : >}

E). Each student write 10 sentences using multiple prep phrases in each sentence. Highlight each prep phrase when you are done writing your sentences. Prepare to share.

F).Use the link to practice finding prep phrases. Or, better, use a hard copy and highlight.

 https://docs.google.com/document/d/1399zZ1YLAswDvRd-iLLFfuv5A0mM-MZ0Vsiblf3-nIo/edit

Goal reviewed

Let's review our goal:

Goal- Scholars will be able to (SWBAT) craft prepositional phrases and identify prep phrases.

If you think you accomplished this goal, give me high five! 

If you think you know this stuff so well you could teach it to someone else, give me a high 10!

If you think you are still needing help to really meet this goal, give me a thumbs up! 

Great job!