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  • Psychonomic Bulletin & Review
Bayesian inference for psychology. Part II: Example applications with JASP
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Bayesian hypothesis testing presents an attractive alternative to p value hypothesis testing. Part I of this series outlined several advantages of Bayesian hypothesis testing, including the ability to quantify evidence and the ability to monitor and update this evidence as data come in, without the need to know the intention with which the data were collected. Despite these and other practical advantages, Bayesian hypothesis tests are still reported relatively rarely. An important impediment to the widespread adoption of Bayesian tests is arguably the lack of user-friendly software for the run-of-the-mill statistical problems that confront psychologists for the analysis of almost every experiment: the t-test, ANOVA, correlation, regression, and contingency tables. In Part II of this series we introduce JASP (http://www.jasp-stats.org), an open-source, cross-platform, user-friendly graphical software package that allows users to carry out Bayesian hypothesis tests for standard statistical problems. JASP is based in part on the Bayesian analyses implemented in Morey and Rouder’s BayesFactor package for R. Armed with JASP, the practical advantages of Bayesian hypothesis testing are only a mouse click away.

Subject:
Psychology
Material Type:
Reading
Provider:
Psychonomic Bulletin & Review
Author:
Akash Raj
Alexander Etz
Alexander Ly
Alexandra Sarafoglou
Bruno Boutin
Damian Dropmann
Don van den Bergh
Dora Matzke
Eric-Jan Wagenmakers
Erik-Jan van Kesteren
Frans Meerhoff
Helen Steingroever
Jeffrey N. Rouder
Johnny van Doorn
Jonathon Love
Josine Verhagen
Koen Derks
Maarten Marsman
Martin Šmíra
Patrick Knight
Quentin F. Gronau
Ravi Selker
Richard D. Morey
Sacha Epskamp
Tahira Jamil
Tim de Jong
Date Added:
08/07/2020
Internal conceptual replications do not increase independent replication success
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Recently, many psychological effects have been surprisingly difficult to reproduce. This article asks why, and investigates whether conceptually replicating an effect in the original publication is related to the success of independent, direct replications. Two prominent accounts of low reproducibility make different predictions in this respect. One account suggests that psychological phenomena are dependent on unknown contexts that are not reproduced in independent replication attempts. By this account, internal replications indicate that a finding is more robust and, thus, that it is easier to independently replicate it. An alternative account suggests that researchers employ questionable research practices (QRPs), which increase false positive rates. By this account, the success of internal replications may just be the result of QRPs and, thus, internal replications are not predictive of independent replication success. The data of a large reproducibility project support the QRP account: replicating an effect in the original publication is not related to independent replication success. Additional analyses reveal that internally replicated and internally unreplicated effects are not very different in terms of variables associated with replication success. Moreover, social psychological effects in particular appear to lack any benefit from internal replications. Overall, these results indicate that, in this dataset at least, the influence of QRPs is at the heart of failures to replicate psychological findings, especially in social psychology. Variable, unknown contexts appear to play only a relatively minor role. I recommend practical solutions for how QRPs can be avoided.

Subject:
Psychology
Material Type:
Reading
Provider:
Psychonomic Bulletin & Review
Author:
Richard Kunert
Date Added:
08/07/2020