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Ancient History Encyclopedia
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Ancient History Encyclopedia is a non-profit educational website with a global vision: to provide the best ancient history information on the internet for free.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Ancient History
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Homework/Assignment
Interactive
Reading
Textbook
Provider:
Ancient History Encyclopedia
Provider Set:
Individual Authors
Ancient Near East and the Mediterranean World
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This is a collection of digitized material from the Ancient Near East collection at the University of Chicago. The project focused on materials published between 1850 - 1950, drawn from two of the Library's complimentary collections, the Ancient Near East and Classics Collections. Preserved materials relate to the study of the ancient Near East and cover such topics as the archeology, art, history, language, law, and religions of Sumer, Babylonia, Assyria, Egypt, Nubia, Persia, and other ancient peoples of Anatolia and the Fertile Crescent. Classics materials span the time from the rise of Bronze Age Aegean culture through the period in the Middle Ages and include volumes relating to the history, art and archeology of the classical world. Together, these two collections form a rational continuum in the progress of mankind's achievements towards civilization.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Art History
Religious Studies
Education
Material Type:
Reading
Provider:
University of Chicago
Provider Set:
University of Chicago Digital Library Projects
Victory Stele of Naram-Sin
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This art history video discussion looks at the Victory Stele of Naram-Sin, Akkadian, pink limestone, 2254-2218 B.C.E. (Louvre, Paris). This monument depicts the Akkadian victory over the Lullubi Mountain people. In the12th century B.C.E., 1,000 years after it was originally made, the Elamite king, Shutruk-Nahhunte, attacked Babylon and, according to his later inscription, the stele was taken to Susa in what is now Iran. A stele is a vertical stone monument or marker often inscribed with text or relief carving.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Art History
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Lecture
Provider:
Khan Academy
Provider Set:
Smarthistory
Author:
Beth Harris
Steven Zucker