Mid Michigan Community College

This Group is managed by MMCC's Online Learning & Instructional Design Team. *** Mission: The purpose of Mid Michigan Community College is to provide educational and community leadership for the development of human ability. To this end the College provides post-secondary education and services to enable students and the community to achieve success in a global society. Vision: Mid Michigan Community College dedicates itself to being a learning organization that connects and partners with its community for the success of its members. Enduring Goals: 1. Enabling Student Success 2. Enhancing Employee Success 3. Engaging the Community 4. Improving Institutional Effectiveness
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All resources in Mid Michigan Community College

General Chemistry I

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This survey chemistry course is designed to introduce students to the world of chemistry. In this course, we will study chemistry from the ground up, learning the basics of the atom and its behavior. We will apply this knowledge to understand the chemical properties of matter and the changes and reactions that take place in all types of matter. Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to: Define the general term 'chemistry.' Distinguish between the physical and chemical properties of matter. Distinguish between mixtures and pure substances. Describe the arrangement of the periodic table. Perform mathematical operations involving significant figures. Convert measurements into scientific notation. Explain the law of conservation of mass, the law of definite composition, and the law of multiple proportions. Summarize the essential points of Dalton's atomic theory. Define the term 'atom.' Describe electron configurations. Draw Lewis structures for molecules. Name ionic and covalent compounds using the rules for nomenclature of inorganic compounds. Explain the relationship between enthalpy change and a reaction's tendency to occur. (Chemistry 101; See also: Biology 105. Mechanical Engineering 004)

Material Type: Assessment, Full Course, Homework/Assignment, Lecture, Lecture Notes, Reading, Syllabus, Textbook

Analytical Chemistry

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Analytical chemistry spans nearly all areas of chemistry but involves the development of tools and methods to measure physical properties of substances and apply those techniques to the identification of their presence (qualitative analysis) and quantify the amount present (quantitative analysis) of species in a wide variety of settings.

Material Type: Textbook

Analytical Chemistry 2.0

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Analytical chemistry is more than a collection of analytical methods and an understanding of equilibrium chemistry; it is an approach to solving chemical problems. Although equilibrium chemistry and analytical methods are important, their coverage should not come at the expense of other equally important topics. The introductory course in analytical chemistry is the ideal place in the undergraduate chemistry curriculum for exploring topics such as experimental design, sampling, calibration strategies, standardization, optimization, statistics, and the validation of experimental results. Analytical methods come and go, but best practices for designing and validating analytical methods are universal. Because chemistry is an experimental science it is essential that all chemistry students understand the importance of making good measurements.

Material Type: Textbook

Author: David Harvey

The Basics of General, Organic, and Biological Chemistry

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This is a free textbook offered by Saylor Foundation. The Basics of General, Organic, and Biological Chemistry by David W. Ball, John W. Hill, and Rhonda J. Scott is a new textbook offering for the one-semester GOB Chemistry course. The authors designed this book from the ground up to meet the needs of a one-semester course. It is 20 chapters in length and approximately 350-400 pages; just the right breadth and depth for instructors to teach and students to grasp. In addition, The Basics of General, Organic, and Biological Chemistry is written not by one chemist, but THREE chemistry professors with specific, complimentary research and teaching areas. David W. Ball’s specialty is physical chemistry, John W. Hill’s is organic chemistry, and finally, Rhonda J. Scott’s background is in enzyme and peptide chemistry. These three authors have the expertise to identify and present only the most important material for students to learn in the GOB Chemistry course.

Material Type: Textbook

Authors: David W. Ball, John W. Hill and Rhonda J. Scott

Biological Chemistry

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Chemical Biology research uses the tools of chemistry and synthesis to understand biology and disease pathways at the molecular level. Advanced Biological Chemistry interests include diverse topics such as nucleic acids, DNA repair, bioconjugate chemistry, peptides and peptidomimetics, glycoscience, biomolecular structure and function, imaging, and biological catalysis. Biophysical Chemistry represents the union of Chemistry, Physics, and Biology using a variety of experimental and theoretical approaches to understand the structure and function of biological systems.

Material Type: Textbook

Presentation Skills - EklavyaParv

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The possession of impressive presentation skills brings success in life. In all domains of life we need to remain presentable. In the Social-Business-Professional-Educational-Personal-Cultural or in any other segment of life, we need to impress others. Hence, Presentation Skills are must be imparted to the learners.

Material Type: Diagram/Illustration, Lecture Notes, Student Guide, Teaching/Learning Strategy, Textbook

Public Speaking

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The course is an introduction to the preparation and delivery of oral presentations in an extemporaneous style. Emphasis is on ethical research, critical and logical analysis, and organization of informative and persuasive presentations.

Material Type: Full Course, Textbook

Public Speaking

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The purpose of this course is to systematically examine the elements and factors which result in an effective speech. Tying these together are the themes of information and ethics, emphasized in each resource because they are becoming increasingly important to all communicators. Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to: resolve ethical issues involving speech preparation and presentation; recommend techniques for resolving issues, which may interfere with active listening; identify the most effective speech topics, qualities, content, and delivery techniques based on the specific characteristics of an audience; evaluate the effectiveness of speeches for different types of audiences; use online and library-based research to find and critique the credibility of sources of information; cite sources of information appropriately, accurately, and clearly in both spoken and written contexts; choose the most effective pattern of organization for presenting different types of information to a listening audience; evaluate the effectiveness of supporting details or evidence based on the main ideas or arguments they are used to support; choose the most appropriate pattern for organizing a persuasive speech, based on the relationship between arguments and evidence or the relationship between the topic and the audience; identify whether the functions of an introduction or conclusion have been fulfilled and will be effective when presented to a specific type of audience; create keyword and sentence outlines for informative and persuasive speeches; revise a passage written for readers so that it can be delivered effectively and engagingly to listeners; identify and use techniques to improve the fluidity and clarity of verbal delivery; recognize non-verbal techniques that communicate the speakerĺÎĺ_ĺĚĺ_s confidence and credibility in a sample speech; demonstrate comprehensive knowledge of effective, ethical public speaking by accurately and thoroughly assessing the qualities of entire informative, persuasive, and special occasion speeches. This free course may be completed online at any time. (Communication 101)

Material Type: Assessment, Full Course, Homework/Assignment, Lecture, Reading, Syllabus, Textbook

Stand up, Speak out: The Practice and Ethics of Public Speaking

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From audience analysis to giving a presentation, Stand up, Speak out: The Practice and Ethics of Public Speaking will guide students through the speech making process. The authors focus on the process of speech making because they have created this book to be a user-friendly guide to creating, researching, and presenting public speeches. While both classic and current academic research in public speaking guide this book, the authors believe that a new textbook in public speaking should first, and foremost, be a practical book that helps students prepare and deliver a variety of different types of speeches — and that is the primary goal of this book.With practicality in mind, the authors developed, Stand up, Speak out: The Practice and Ethics of Public Speaking, as a streamlined public speaking textbook. Many public speaking textbooks today contain over twenty different chapters, which is often impossible to cover in a ten-week quarter or a sixteen-week semester; this textbook is eighteen unique chapters. The fifteen chapters are divided into four clear units of information: introduction to public speaking, speech preparation, speech creation, and speech presentation.

Material Type: Textbook

Author: Jason Wrench, Anne Goding, Danette Johnson, Bernardo Attias

Intercultural Communication

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This course is designed to help you identify how to become a better communicator in these sorts of cross-cultural situations. You will learn about barriers to successful communication that involve cultural differences. You will also learn more about your own communication style and how it can be developed to facilitate more successful intercultural encounters.

Material Type: Activity/Lab, Full Course, Homework/Assignment, Reading, Syllabus

Principles Of Human Communication

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An introduction to the human communication concentration in the communications major. This course will introduce you to communication principles, common communication practices, and a selection of theories to better understand the communication transactions that you experience in your daily life.

Material Type: Activity/Lab, Full Course, Homework/Assignment, Reading, Syllabus

Media Constructions of Martin Luther King, Jr.

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This kit explores the ways in which King and his legacy have been portrayed in various media forms. The first lesson follows a chronology of King's life through interactive decoding of rich media documents (comic books, billboards, songs, music videos, etc.). The following lessons use excerpts of Dr. King's speeches from 1963, 1967 and 1968 to examine his views on social change; explore the portrayal of King in magazine covers, advertisements, Web sites, film clips and monuments; and use letters to the editor about celebrating King to explore challenges to change.

Material Type: Activity/Lab, Diagram/Illustration, Homework/Assignment, Lesson Plan, Reading, Teaching/Learning Strategy, Unit of Study

Authors: Andrea Volckmar, Barry Derfel, Chris, Christopher Carey, Cyndy Scheibe, Eric Acree, Faith Rogow, Kim Fontana, Lauren Trichon, Moira Lang, Robin Rosoff, Sox Sperry, Sperry, Tanya Saunders

Media Construction of Presidential Campaigns

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This curriculum kit helps to teach about the role of media in 28 U.S. elections ranging from 1800-2008. Over 160 media documents are included for decoding, including slides of posters, handbills and political cartoons; audio clips of songs and radio programs; and video clips of speeches, debates, comedy TV and political commercials. Students will learn how to analyze historical documents, the history of presidential campaigns, the crafting and marketing of campaign messages, and the impact of new technologies and new media on presidential campaigns.

Material Type: Activity/Lab, Diagram/Illustration, Homework/Assignment, Lesson Plan, Reading, Teaching/Learning Strategy, Unit of Study

Author: Sox Sperry & Chris Sperry

Computer-Aided Design (CAD)

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CAD, or computer-aided design, is a powerful modeling tool that technical professionals use. This course will introduce the student to the process of modeling 2- and 3-D objects with computer-aided design; the student will learn the basics of drafting by hand as well. Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to: Describe the design process and basic CAD practices for engineering design and drawing; Identify CAD representations like orthographic projections, 3D modeling, and section views; Identify and use CAD annotation and presentation skills like dimensioning, tolerance, and assembly drawings; Create 2D sketches and parts using CAD software; Edit and modify 2D sketches and parts using CAD software; Print and present 2D sketches and parts using CAD software; Model basic and advanced 3D parts using CAD software; Edit and modify basic and advanced 3D parts using CAD software; Create 3D assemblies using CAD software; Create 2D projections from 3D models and assemblies and learn how to annotate projections; Apply the skills attained from 2D and 3D modeling to design working drawings by using CAD software. (Mechanical Engineering 104)

Material Type: Full Course

A Beginner's Guide to High-Performance Computing

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This module presents some of the general ideas behind and basics principles of high-performance computing (HPC) as performed on a supercomputer. These concepts should remain valid even as the technical specification of the latest machines continually change. Although this material is aimed at HPC supercomputers, if history be a guide, present HPC hardware and software become desktop machines in less than a decade.

Material Type: Module

Author: Rubin Landau

Race, Crime, and Citizenship in American Law, Fall 2014

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This seminar looks at key issues in the historical development and current state of modern American criminal justice, with an emphasis on its relationship to citizenship, nationhood, and race/ethnicity. We begin with a range of perspectives on the rise of what is often called "mass incarceration": how did our current system of criminal punishment take shape, and what role did race play in that process? Part Two takes up a series of case studies, including racial disparities in the administration of the death penalty, enforcement of the drug laws, and the regulation of police investigations. The third and final part of the seminar looks at national security policing: the development of a constitutional law governing the intersection of ethnicity, religion, and counter-terrorism, and the impact of counter-terrorism policy on domestic police practices.

Material Type: Full Course

Author: Ghachem, Malick

Ethics in Law Enforcement

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In this book, you will examine the moral and ethical issues that exist within law enforcement. This book will also familiarize you with the basic history, principles, and theories of ethics. These concepts will then be applied to the major components of the criminal justice system: policing, the courts, and corrections. Discussion will focus on personal values, individual responsibility, decision making, discretion, and the structure of accountability. Specific topics covered will include core values, codes of conduct, ethical dilemmas, organizational consequences, liability, and the importance of critical thinking. By the end of this book, you will be able to distinguish and critically debate contemporary ethical issues in law enforcement.

Material Type: Textbook

Author: Steve McCartney