Appalachia IU

Appalachia Intermediate Unit 8 is one of 29 PA Intermediate Units participating in the Pennsylvania Association of Intermediate Unit’s OER implementation. This group provides a space to collaborate, evaluate, share, develop and promote the free and open use of educational resources by and for LEAs in Pennsylvania.
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All resources in Appalachia IU

Problem Based Module: Communication Barriers

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In this project, you will explore a real-world problem, and then work through a series of steps to analyze that problem, research ways the problem could be solved, then propose a possible solution to that problem. Often, there are no specific right or wrong solutions, but sometimes one particular solution may be better than others. The key is making sure you fully understand the problem, have researched some possible solutions, and have proposed the solution that you can support with information / evidence.Begin by reading the problem statement in Step 1. Take the time to review all the information provided in the statement, including exploring the websites, videos and / or articles that are linked. Then work on steps 2 through 8 to complete this problem-based learning experience.

Material Type: Lesson Plan

Authors: Bonnie Waltz, Deanna Mayers, Tracy Rains

Listening With a Purpose

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Active listening is more than just hearing someone speak. It requires you to be engaged in the moment, to receive the words and body language of someone else, meaningfully. Only then can you feel empathy for the speaker--that is, try to feel what they’re feeling. In this seminar, you will become familiar with nonverbal listening skills--those strategies that require you to say nothing, yet still be part of the conversation. As you learn more about these non-verbal listening skills, you will begin to classify them into particular situations, understanding when certain gestures might be preferred or not preferred.StandardsCC.1.5.9-10.AInitiate and participate effectively in a range of collaborative discussions on grades level topics, texts, and issues, building on others’ ideas and expressing their own clearly and persuasively.CC.1.5.9-10.CIntegrate multiple sources of information presented in diverse media or formats (e.g. visually, quantitatively, orally) evaluating the credibility and accuracy of each source.CC.1.5.9-10.DPresent information, findings, and supporting evidence clearly, concisely, and logically such that listeners can follow the line of reasoning; ensure that the presentation is appropriate to purpose, audience, and task.

Material Type: Lesson Plan

Authors: Bonnie Waltz, Deanna Mayers, Tracy Rains

Planning & Presenting Effectively

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Speaking in public can be a terrifying experience. But it can also be exciting and beneficial--for the speaker and the audience. This seminar will focus on presenting clear and concise information to an intended audience. To be an effective speaker, you must understand empathy--the ability to feel what others feel, especially your audience. You will also need to be able to speak differently to different audiences, classifying your presentations in various categories. (You probably do that already, but it’s important to understand how you communicate in different ways, depending on who’s listening.)StandardsCC.1.5.9-10.AInitiate and participate effectively in a range of collaborative discussions on grade level topics, texts, and issues, building on others’ ideas and expressing their own clearly and persuasively.CC.1.5.9-10.CIntegrate multiple sources of information presented in diverse media or formats (e.g., visually, quantitatively, orally) evaluating the credibility and accuracy of each source.CC.1.5.9-10.DPresent information, findings, and supporting evidence clearly, concisely, and logically such that listeners can follow the line of reasoning; ensure that the presentation is appropriate to purpose, audience, and task.

Material Type: Lesson Plan

Authors: Bonnie Waltz, Deanna Mayers, Tracy Rains

Moving the Plot With Dialogue

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In this seminar, you’ll learn about dialogue, including how writers use it to “move” their stories along. As a narrator, you will practice using dialogue, which will help you understand how people involved in conflict interact genuinely. Some lines of dialogue will be longer than others; there’s a reason for that. Some narratives have very little dialogue; there’s a reason for that. Ultimately, you will continue to analyze the perspectives of characters (people) in a narrative setting to better understand the human condition and how their voices contribute to it. This seminar will require innovation on your part, as you will not only learn terminology associated with dialogue, but also put those devices into action as you create your own (mini) narrative with characters who interact.StandardsCC.1.4.9-10.MWrite narratives to develop real or imagined experiences or events.CC.1.4.9-10.NEngage and orient the reader by setting out a problem, situation, or observation, establishing one or multiple points of view, and introducing a narrator and/or characters.CC.1.4.9-10.PCreate a smooth progression of experiences or events using a variety of techniques to sequence events so that they build on one another to create a coherent whole; provide a conclusion that follows from and reflects on what is experienced, observed, or resolved over the course of the narrative. 

Material Type: Lesson Plan

Author: Tracy Rains

Resolving Internal and External Conflicts

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In many English classes, conflicts appear in fiction: short stories, novels, and plays. But conflicts--both internal and external--also play a part in our daily lives and become part of our narratives. In fact, a personal narrative (an essay about a personal experience) revolves around a central conflict. Often, the conflict is caused by internal or external forces, and the narrator reveals how the problem was resolved. In this seminar, you will learn more about internal and external conflicts and how both contribute to our human experience. In the process, you will continue to analyze the perspectives of the people involved in the conflict, striving to accurately portray their roles in your narrative.Standards CC.1.4.9-10.MWrite narratives to develop real or imagined experiences or events.CC.1.4.9-10.NEngage and orient the reader by setting out a problem, situation, or observation, establishing one or multiple points of view, and introducing a narrator and/or characters.CC.1.4.9-10.PCreate a smooth progression of experiences or events using a variety of techniques to sequence events so that they build on one another to create a coherent whole; provide a conclusion that follows from and reflects on what is experienced, observed, or resolved over the course of the narrative. 

Material Type: Lesson Plan

Author: Tracy Rains

The Personal Point of View

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You’ve probably learned about point of view in previous English classes, even as far back as elementary school. It’s an important aspect of storytelling, including storytelling in the form of the personal narrative. In this seminar, you will refresh your memory about point of view and push your learning to determine the role it plays in a narrative. You will also be imagining different stories that you have to tell, considering how your personal narratives might change depending on the point of view. Seeing a conflict from a different perspective is important, so analyzing it through the lens of someone else could have a strong impact on your writing. In short, you will focus not just on the story itself but also the voice telling the story.StandardsCC.1.4.9-10.MWrite narratives to develop real or imagined experiences or events.CC.1.4.9-10.NEngage and orient the reader by setting out a problem, situation, or observation, establishing one or multiple points of view, and introducing a narrator and/or characters.CC.1.4.9-10.PCreate a smooth progression of experiences or events using a variety of techniques to sequence events so that they build on one another to create a coherent whole; provide a conclusion that follows from and reflects on what is experienced, observed, or resolved over the course of the narrative.  

Material Type: Lesson Plan

Author: Tracy Rains

PROBLEM: Censorship of Personal Expression

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In this project, you will explore a real-world problem, and then work through a series of steps to analyze that problem, research ways the problem could be solved, then propose a possible solution to that problem. Often, there are no specific right or wrong solutions, but sometimes one particular solution may be better than others. The key is making sure you fully understand the problem, have researched some possible solutions, and have proposed the solution that you can support with information / evidence. Begin by reading the problem statement in Step 1. Take the time to review all the information provided in the statement, including exploring the websites, videos and / or articles that are linked. Then work on steps 2 through 8 to complete this problem-based learning experience.

Material Type: Lesson Plan

Author: Tracy Rains

Prokaryotic Cells

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Cells are the fundamental unit of all living things; however, there are many different types of cells. Students often look at the world with a concrete, inflexible view, knowing only what they see with their eyes. Life is diverse and different, and you will be challenged as you investigate life that is different from you. For this experience, we focus on one of the two major divisions of cells called Prokaryotic Cells. These cells are considered primitive compared to the cells that make up humans. Learners will explore various types of prokaryotic cells and reflect on how they relate to their cell functions.StandardsBIO.A.1.2.1 Compare cellular structures and their functions in prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells

Material Type: Lesson Plan

Authors: Bonnie Waltz, Deanna Mayers, Tracy Rains

The Basics of Cells

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Cells are the fundamental unit of all living things. Cells are composed of a variety of organelles that underlie the structure and function of the cell. In this experience we will complete a brief overview of cell theory and look at the basics of how we study cells.StandardsBIO.A.1.2.2 Describe and interpret relationships between structure and function at various levels of biological organization (i.e., organelles, cells, tissues, organs, organ systems, and multicellular organisms).

Material Type: Lesson Plan

Authors: Bonnie Waltz, Deanna Mayers, Tracy Rains

Eukaryotic Cells

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Eukaryotic cells are the foundation of our human body. They help us produce energy, grow, move, and carry out all our life functions. Looking at these cells, the learner will be challenged to explain how they help us grow and function. Eukaryotic cells are unique in the cellular world because they have membrane bound organelles. For this lesson experience, the learner will explore eukaryotic cell structure and function. Additionally they will travel through models of the cells, drawing comparisons with life functions at the micro and macro level.StandardsBIO.A.1.2.1 Compare cellular structures and their functions in prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells

Material Type: Lesson Plan

Authors: Bonnie Waltz, Deanna Mayers, Tracy Rains

Problem Based Module: Mitochondrial Disease

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In this project, you will explore a real-world problem, and then work through a series of steps to analyze that problem, research ways the problem could be solved, then propose a possible solution to that problem. Often, there are no specific right or wrong solutions, but sometimes one particular solution may be better than others. The key is making sure you fully understand the problem, have researched some possible solutions, and have proposed the solution that you can support with information / evidence.Begin by reading the problem statement in Step 1. Take the time to review all the information provided in the statement, including exploring the websites, videos and / or articles that are linked. Then work on steps 2 through 8 to complete this problem-based learning experience.

Material Type: Lesson Plan

Authors: Bonnie Waltz, Deanna Mayers, Tracy Rains

Levels of Organization

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All living things are organized. From the simplest molecule to most complex ecosystem, living organisms have structures that perform tasks at every level. From reproduction to gathering energy, even simple single celled organisms have organization. In this seminar we will explore how living things are organized, from the smallest particles imaginable to the most complex ecosystem on Earth.StandardsBIO.A.1.2.2 Describe and interpret relationships between structure and function at various levels of biological organization (i.e., organelles, cells, tissues, organs, organ systems, and multicellular organisms)

Material Type: Lesson Plan

Authors: Bonnie Waltz, Deanna Mayers, Tracy Rains

Themes and Concepts of Biology

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Biology is the study of life; however, there is more to it than this simple definition. In this seminar, you will be investigating the Unifying Principles of Biology. For example, changes and adaption of life are observed in nature. Regardless of the organism, those that are the best adapted will survive. This unifying principle and several others will be explored in this seminar.StandardsBIO.A.1.1 Describe the characteristics of life shared by all prokaryotic and eukaryotic organisms.

Material Type: Lesson Plan

Authors: Bonnie Waltz, Deanna Mayers, Tracy Rains

Traits of Life and Living Things

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This seminar helps the learner explore the basic concepts of life and what that means.  All life has certain things in common as well as a basic level of organization.  In this seminar you will investigate these traits and why they are important to life.StandardsBIO.A.1.1.1 Describe the characteristics of life shared by all prokaryotic and eukaryotic organisms.

Material Type: Lesson Plan

Authors: Bonnie Waltz, Deanna Mayers, Tracy Rains

Problem Based Module: Viruses

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In this project, you will explore a real-world problem, and then work through a series of steps to analyze that problem, research ways the problem could be solved, then propose a possible solution to that problem. Often, there are no specific right or wrong solutions, but sometimes one particular solution may be better than others. The key is making sure you fully understand the problem, have researched some possible solutions, and have proposed the solution that you can support with information / evidence.Begin by reading the problem statement in Step 1. Take the time to review all the information provided in the statement, including exploring the websites, videos and / or articles that are linked. Then work on steps 2 through 8 to complete this problem-based learning experience.

Material Type: Lesson Plan

Authors: Bonnie Waltz, Deanna Mayers, Tracy Rains

Problem Based Module: The Fountain of Youth

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In this project, you will explore a real-world problem, and then work through a series of steps to analyze that problem, research ways the problem could be solved, then propose a possible solution to that problem. Often, there are no specific right or wrong solutions, but sometimes one particular solution may be better than others. The key is making sure you fully understand the problem, have researched some possible solutions, and have proposed the solution that you can support with information / evidence.Begin by reading the problem statement in Step 1. Take the time to review all the information provided in the statement, including exploring the websites, videos and / or articles that are linked. Then work on steps 2 through 8 to complete this problem-based learning experience.

Material Type: Lesson Plan

Authors: Bonnie Waltz, Deanna Mayers, Tracy Rains

ATP as Cellular Energy

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In this seminar you will read closely and analyze the structure of ATP- Adenosine Triphosphate. You will curate your own  information about the importance of ATP in a cell by listening and reading text as to what the experts have to say.  By modeling the function of ATP in an inquiry lab you can accurately identify the  various levels of cellular work done by Adenosine Triphosphate.StandardsBIO.A.3.1.1 Describe the fundamental roles of plastids (e.g., chloroplasts) and mitochondria in energy transformations.BIO.A.3.2.1 Compare and contrast the basic transformation of energy during photosynthesis and cellular respiration.BIO.A.3.2.2 Describe the role of ATP in biochemical reactions

Material Type: Lesson Plan

Authors: Bonnie Waltz, Deanna Mayers, Tracy Rains

Carbon Cycles

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In this seminar you will examine the path of carbon as it transforms from one molecule to the next in the processes of photosynthesis and cell respiration. You will accurately create the chemical equations of photosynthesis and cell respiration and further your practice by using comparison and contrast skills to explore the different types of respiration.StandardsBIO.A.3.1.1 Describe the fundamental roles of plastids (e.g., chloroplasts) and mitochondria in energy transformations.BIO.A.3.2.1 Compare and contrast the basic transformation of energy during photosynthesis and cellular respiration.BIO.A.3.2.2 Describe the role of ATP in biochemical reactions

Material Type: Lesson Plan

Authors: Bonnie Waltz, Deanna Mayers, Tracy Rains

Chloroplast and Mitochondria in Cellular Energy

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In this seminar you will use images to differentiate the structure of a chloroplast and mitochondria. You will follow an animation to learn about the two essential processes that take place in each cell organelle to accurately determine the importance of structure and function. You will also analyze data from mice to determine the effects of exercise and performance enhancing drugs on the presence of mitochondria in a cell, or extract chlorophyll from various levels to examine its function outside a chloroplast.StandardsBIO.A.3.1.1 Describe the fundamental roles of plastids (e.g., chloroplasts) and mitochondria in energy transformations.BIO.A.3.2.1 Compare and contrast the basic transformation of energy during photosynthesis and cellular respiration.BIO.A.3.2.2 Describe the role of ATP in biochemical reactions

Material Type: Lesson Plan

Authors: Bonnie Waltz, Deanna Mayers, Tracy Rains

Problem Based Module: Water is Free?

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In this project, you will explore a real-world problem, and then work through a series of steps to analyze that problem, research ways the problem could be solved, then propose a possible solution to that problem. Often, there are no specific right or wrong solutions, but sometimes one particular solution may be better than others. The key is making sure you fully understand the problem, have researched some possible solutions, and have proposed the solution that you can support with information / evidence.Begin by reading the problem statement in Step 1. Take the time to review all the information provided in the statement, including exploring the websites, videos and / or articles that are linked. Then work on steps 2 through 8 to complete this problem-based learning experience.

Material Type: Lesson Plan

Authors: Bonnie Waltz, Deanna Mayers, Tracy Rains