Subject:
English Language Arts, Composition and Rhetoric
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Level:
High School
Grade:
11
Provider:
Pearson
Tags:
American Dream, Grade 11 ELA, Writing
License:
Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0
Language:
English

Reading about the American Dream

Reading about the American Dream

Overview

In this lesson, students will meet with their Independent Reading group to discuss their book and how it relates to the conversations they have been having about the American Dream.

Preparation

  • Read the lesson and student content.
  • Anticipate student difficulties and identify the differentiation options you will choose for working with your students.

Independent Reading Groups

Independent Reading Groups

  • Meet with your group and decide who will fill each role—leader, note taker, reporter, and timekeeper—today.
  • Help students prepare to work in groups by reminding them of the different roles.

Opening

Opening Independent Reading Groups

  • Meet with your group and decide who will fill each role—leader, note taker, reporter, and timekeeper— today.

Book Discussion

Book Discussion

  • Look back at your notes from your last Book Club meeting.. Discuss major developments or changes in the following categories:
    • Setting
    • Key characters
    • Plot
  • Discuss any points that need clarifying.
    • What are you able to figure out or guess together?
  • What happened to the character(s) you saw pursuing the American Dream?
    • How did their stories end?
  • What broader themes, messages, or lessons have emerged about the American Dream? Explain.
  • Project or display the student instructions for easier viewing.
  • Remind students that they will be using their books for evidence in their final papers; encourage them to take advantage of the time with their groups.

Work Time

Book Discussion

Discuss your book with your group. Use the following points to guide your discussion.

  • Look back at your notes from your last Book Club meeting. Discuss major developments or changes in the following categories:
    • Setting
    • Key characters
    • Plot
  • Discuss any points that need clarifying.
    • What are you able to figure out or guess together?
  • What happened to the character(s) you saw pursuing the American Dream?
    • How did their stories end?
  • What broader themes, messages, or lessons have emerged about the American Dream? Explain.

Journal Entry 9

Journal Entry 9

Complete Journal Entry 9: review your previous entries, then write on the topic below.

  • How has your own thinking about the American Dream changed over the unit so far?
  • What has caused these changes?
  • Prompt students to read through their earlier journal entries before writing this one (they are in Lessons 2 , 3 , 7 , 8 , 10 , 15 , and 16 ).
    • SWD: Students with executive functioning difficulties may benefit from using a chart or making a list to track the evolution of their own thinking on this topic. If you choose, work with them to facilitate this intermediate step.
    • ELL: This is a good opportunity to check in with ELLs and review their writing with them to help them organize their thoughts and ideas.

Closing

Journal Entry 9

Complete Journal Entry 9: review your previous entries, then write on the topic below.

  • How has your own thinking about the American Dream changed over the unit so far?
  • What has caused these changes?

Writing Review

Writing Review

  • Review your numbered journal entries, Dialectical Journal entries, and notes in preparation for your final paper, which you will begin in the next lesson.
  • Explain to students that they need to have all of the writing they've done fresh in their minds before writing the final paper.

Homework

Writing Review

  • Review your journal entries, Dialectical Journal, and notes in preparation for your final paper, which you will begin in the next lesson.

Independent Reading Dialectical Journal