Author:
Laura Knapp, MSDE Admin, Kathleen Maher-Baker
Subject:
English Language Arts
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Level:
Middle School
Grade:
8
Tags:
Argumentative, MSDE, MSDE ELA, Maryland State Department of Education, Speaking and Listening
License:
Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial
Language:
English

Education Standards (48)

Grade 8 Does Speech Matter Lesson #4 Argumentative Speech Remix

Grade 8 Does Speech Matter Lesson #4 Argumentative Speech Remix

Overview

This lesson is intended to be taught over multiple days, focusing on Chapter XIII: Two Thousand Miles for A Five-Minute Speech from Up From Slavery by Booker T. Washington.  The students will also complete a close read of The Atlanta Exposition Address by Booker T. Washington.  Through the two texts, students will read about the events that led Booker T. Washington to deliver a speech at the Atlanta Exposition.  Students will write and deliver their own speech, supporting their arguments with claims and evidence.

 

Image source: "Booker T. Washington" by skeeze on Pixabay.com

Day 1: Chapter XIII: Two Thousand Miles for a Five-Minute Speech

  • The teacher should review the meaning of point of view and viewpoint with the students and provide some examples before reading the text.
  • Students will read Chapter XIII: Two Thousand Miles For A Five-Minute Speech.
  • While reading, students will identify the events that led Booker T. Washington to deliver the speech at The Atlanta Exposition, as well as Washington’s point of view in the text.
  • Students will look up unknown words via www.dictionary.com while reading the text.
  • Students will annotate the text noting important words, phrases, and ideas that connect to the overall argument that Booker T. Washington is conveying in the text.
  • Students will analyze and discuss Booker T. Washington’s attitudes and beliefs as they are expressed in the text.
  • Students should take notes while reading.  Option to take notes digitally and create their own graphic organizing using a web tool such as AwwApp or Stoodle.
    • Read Chapter XIII: Two Thousand Miles For A Five-Minute Speech.
    • While reading, identify the events that led Booker T. Washington to deliver the speech at The Atlanta Exposition, as well as Washington’s point of view in the text.
    • Look up unknown words via www.dictionary.com while reading the text.
    • Annotate the text noting important words, phrases, and ideas that connect to the overall argument that Booker T. Washington is conveying in the text.
    • Analyze and discuss Booker T. Washington’s attitudes and beliefs as they are expressed in the text.
    • Take notes while reading.  Option to take notes digitally and create your own graphic organizing using a web tool such as AwwApp or Stoodle.

      Day 2: The Atlanta Exposition Address

      • Students will complete an initial read of The Atlanta Exposition Address, and annotate the text noting important words, phrases, and ideas that connect to the overall point that Booker T. Washington is conveying in the speech. Option to share in a web tool such as Padlet.
      • Students will discuss the speech in groups, comparing their annotations and identifying the point that Booker T. Washington is conveying in the speech, as well as the evidence to support the argument.
      • Complete an initial read of The Atlanta Exposition Address, and annotate the text noting important words, phrases, and ideas that connect to the overall point that Booker T. Washington is conveying in the speech.
      • Discuss the speech in groups, comparing your annotations and identifying the point that Booker T. Washington is conveying in the speech, as well as the evidence to support the argument.

      Day 3: Close Read of The Atlanta Exposition Address

      • Students will complete a close read of the speech to determine the author’s point of view in the text and analyze how the author acknowledges and responds to conflicting viewpoints.
      • Students will respond to the following questions:

      o   Where is Booker T. Washington delivering his speech?
      o   Why was Booker T. Washington invited to speak at the Atlanta Exposition?
      o   Who is Booker T. Washington addressing in his speech?
      o   What does Booker T. Washington believe has to be accomplished for African
      Americans to progress?
      o   How do his attitudes and beliefs shape the message(s) that he delivers in the speech?
      o   What were Washington’s views on improving education at Tuskegee Institute?
      o   What message was Booker T. Washington try to convey in the paragraph that starts with, “In this address I said…?”
      o   How does Booker T. Washington acknowledge and respond to conflicting viewpoints after he delivers the speech at The Atlanta Exposition?

      • Students will choose one question to further develop into routine process writing.  Students should produce clear and coherent writing in which the development, organization, and style are appropriate to task, purpose, and audience. Students should strengthen writing as needed by planning, revising, editing, and rewriting as needed. Evidence should be cited as needed from the autobiography.
      • Complete a close read of the speech to determine the author’s point of view in the text and analyze how the author acknowledges and responds to conflicting viewpoints.
      • Respond to the following questions:
        o   Where is Booker T. Washington delivering his speech?
        o   Why was Booker T. Washington invited to speak at the Atlanta Exposition?
        o   Who is Booker T. Washington addressing in his speech?
        o   What does Booker T. Washington believe has to be accomplished for African Americans to progress?
        o   How do his attitudes and beliefs shape the message(s) that he delivers in the speech?
        o   What were Washington’s views on improving education at Tuskegee Institute?
        o   What message was Booker T. Washington try to convey in the paragraph that starts with, “In this address I said…?”
        o   How does Booker T. Washington acknowledge and respond to conflicting viewpoints after he delivers the speech at The Atlanta Exposition?
      • Choose one question to further develop into routine process writing.  Produce clear and coherent writing in which the development, organization, and style are appropriate to task, purpose, and audience. Strengthen your writing as needed by planning, revising, editing, and rewriting as needed. Evidence should be cited as needed from the autobiography.

      Day 4: Socratic Seminar

      • The teacher should use the following questions for a Socratic Seminar and to support students understanding of the texts
        • Does Washington’s speech appeal to emotion or logic?
        • How does Washington’s use of impactful language impact the message conveyed in his speech?
        • Analyze the impact of repeated words and phrases in the text.
        • Washington says, “No race can prosper till it learns that there is as much dignity in tilling a field as in writing a poem.” What is he alluding to in this sentence?
        • How does Booker T. Washington express his viewpoint on industrial education?
        • Which lines in the speech express Booker T. Washington’s viewpoint on education? Analyze those lines to determine what they mean.
        • Define the word aphorism and explain how Washington using an aphorism in his speech.
        • Is this an effective speech?  Why or why not?
        • How does the speech state Booker T. Washington’s position?
        • How did Booker T. Washington begin his career in public speaking?
        • How does the overall message of the speech compare to the overall message of Chapter XIII: Two Thousand Miles For A Five-Minute Speech?
      • Participate in a Socratic Seminar centered around the following questions:
        • Does Washington’s speech appeal to emotion or logic?
        • How does Washington’s use of impactful language impact the message conveyed in his speech?
        • Analyze the impact of repeated words and phrases in the text.
        • Washington says, “No race can prosper till it learns that there is as much dignity in tilling a field as in writing a poem.” What is he alluding to in this sentence?
        • How does Booker T. Washington express his viewpoint on industrial education?
        • Which lines in the speech express Booker T. Washington’s viewpoint on education? Analyze those lines to determine what they mean.
        • Define the word aphorism and explain how Washington using an aphorism in his speech.
        • Is this an effective speech?  Why or why not?
        • How does the speech state Booker T. Washington’s position?
        • How did Booker T. Washington begin his career in public speaking?
        • How does the overall message of the speech compare to the overall message of Chapter XIII: Two Thousand Miles For A Five-Minute Speech?

      Day 5: Argumentative Speech Planning

      • Students should review the components of a basic argument: a claim, evidence, and analysis
      • Students will identify an argument on which to write a speech and the intended audience for the speech.
      • Students will identify how they will support their claim: emotions, logic, facts, real world connections, impactful language, and sources.
      • Students will create a graphic organizer to assist with organizing and writing the speech. Option for students to create their own graphic organizing using a web tool such as AwwApp or Stoodle.
      • Students can refer to Lesson seed 1 for their brainstorm list of topics and ideas for writing a speech.
      • Students will write an argument to support claims with clear reasons.
      • The speech should state what position the students is arguing for or against.
      • Students will present a clear viewpoint and supporting evidence for their claim.
      • Students will introduce the claim and acknowledge and distinguish the claim from alternate or opposing claims.
      • The claim should be supported with logical reasoning and relevant evidence, using accurate, credible sources and demonstrating an understanding of the topic.
      • Words, phrases, and clauses should be used to create cohesion and clarify the relationship among claims, counterclaims, reasons, and evidence.
      • Students will provide a concluding statement that follows from and supports the argument presented.
      • Review the components of a basic argument: a claim, evidence, and analysis
      • Identify an argument on which to write a speech and the intended audience for the speech.
      • Identify how they will support their claim: emotions, logic, facts, real world connections, impactful language, and sources.
      • Create a graphic organizer to assist with organizing and writing the speech. Create your own graphic organizer using a web tool such as AwwApp or Stoodle.
      • Refer to your brainstorm list of topics and ideas for writing a speech from earlier in the unit.
      • Write an argument to support claims with clear reasons.
      • The speech should state what position the students is arguing for or against.
      • Present a clear viewpoint and supporting evidence for your claim.
      • Introduce the claim and acknowledge and distinguish the claim from alternate or opposing claims.
      • Your claim should be supported with logical reasoning and relevant evidence, using accurate, credible sources and demonstrating an understanding of the topic.
      • Words, phrases, and clauses should be used to create cohesion and clarify the relationship among claims, counterclaims, reasons, and evidence.
      • Provide a concluding statement that follows from and supports the argument presented.

      Day 6: Argumentative Speech Revisions

      • The teacher should assist the students or have students peer edit the speech to plan, revise, edit, rewrite, and publish.
      • Students will focus on the purpose and audience for the speech.
      • Students will produce and publish their speeches. Option to publish the speech as a podcast or video. Option to have students share a specific part of their speech (such as the opening or closing) to Padlet (up to 15 seconds) as audio/video for peer feedback).
      • Students should practice the speech and be prepared to deliver the speech in class.
      • Peer edit the speech to plan, revise, edit, rewrite, and publish.
      • Focus on the purpose and audience for the speech.
      • Produce and publish your speech. 
      • Practice the speech and be prepared to deliver your speech in class.

      Days 7 & 8: Speech Delivery

      • Students will deliver their speeches to the class.
      • The teacher will determine a schedule for presentation of speeches.
      • Students will peer-evaluate one another’s speech using a strategy such as PQP (Praise-Question-Polish).
      • Deliver your speech to the class.
      • Peer-evaluate your classmates' speeches using a strategy such as PQP (Praise-Question-Polish).

      Day 9: Closure

      • Students will respond to the essential question: How can taking a stand help to develop a person’s belief system?
      • Students will use the texts referenced throughout the unit to respond to the essential question.
      • Respond to the essential question: How can taking a stand help to develop a person’s belief system?
      • Use the texts referenced throughout the unit to respond to the essential question.