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  • Calfornia Social Work Education Center
Ethnic Sensitive Child Welfare Practice: Videotape Series Guide
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This is for videotape owners who have lost their user's guide. It suggests ways to use the videotapes and includes information on focusing discussions, leading exercises, providing handouts, and preparing exam questions. (35 pages)Orozco, E., & Clark, S. J. (1997).

Subject:
Social Work
Material Type:
Module
Author:
CalSWEC
Date Added:
03/02/2018
Factors Leading to Premature Terminations of Kinship Care Placements
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This curriculum focuses on factors that may lead to differential placement outcomes for children who have become dependents of the court, as the result of abuse and neglect, and have been placed with kin rather than in traditional foster homes. It is intended for use by child welfare faculty in California’s schools of social work or social welfare in both BSW and MSW programs and may be used in direct practice or Human Behavior and the Social Environment (HBSE) classes. In addition, the curriculum, or parts from it, may be used in workshops provided to line workers, supervisors, and/or managers by any of the public child welfare training academies in California or public child welfare agencies. The intent of this curriculum is to provide students and child welfare professionals with (a) background information on kinship care as an alternative to traditional foster care, (b) a brief review of the literature pertaining to the characteristics of dependent children in kinship care and their care providers, (c) opportunities to discuss beliefs about why kinship care is valuable (or not) and why it may or may not be successful, (d) demographic data pertaining to selected characteristics of children in kinship care and their care providers derived from a sample of California child welfare cases, (e) factors which may or may not be related to premature termination of kinship care placements, (f) caregiver perceptions of differential placement outcomes, (g) social worker perceptions of differential placement outcomes, and (h) opportunities to discuss how students and/or child welfare workers can decrease premature termination of kinship care placements. The curriculum is accompanied by a PowerPoint presentation containing key points from each module followed by one or more slides presenting an “active learning experience.” (78 pages) Chang, J., Liles, R., & Hoang, T. (2006).

Subject:
Social Work
Material Type:
Module
Author:
CalSWEC
Date Added:
03/01/2018
Family Group Decision-Making Models for Social Workers in the Child Welfare Setting
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This curriculum introduces the Family Group Decision Making (FGDM) model of working with families in child welfare and is based on a core belief that within families lies the wisdom to find solutions to protect their own children and resolve other issues of concern. The six modules cover the historical perspective of FGDM; models of FGDM; cultural competency; micro, mezzo, and macro level skills utilized in FGDM; practice; and outcome measures. In addition to lecture content, modules include instructional guides and suggestions, interactive exercises, topics for discussion, video and other resource suggestions, and a pre- and posttest instrument with answer sheet. An appendix of handouts, workshop evaluation form, references, and list of information sources and resources is included. (128 pages)Okamura, A., Quinnett, E. (2000).

Subject:
Social Work
Material Type:
Module
Author:
CalSWEC
Date Added:
03/01/2018
Indian Families and Child Welfare: A Training Curriculum
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This module supports the guidelines of the Indian Child Welfare Act. It provides information on overcoming Indian families' fundamental mistrust and engaging families appropriately; how federal Indian policy affects Indian communities: Indian culture, traditions, family, and child rearing; the role of extended family systems and community networks for reservation and non-reservation Indians; the premise and guidelines of the ICWA and related federal and state laws that govern the implementation of the ICWA: the notion that the best interests of the Indian child are served by the tribes; collaborating with tribal workers; the role of cultural factors in risk assessment of Indian child welfare cases; community resources and skills in networking within the Indian community and within rural Indian community settings; skills in a variety of social work methods; and the differences between particular tribes. (236 pages)Becker, I., Daly, D., Gross, B., Robertson, G., Robinson, M., Casey, D., et al. (2000).

Subject:
Social Work
Material Type:
Module
Author:
CalSWEC
Date Added:
03/01/2018
Kinship Care in California: An Empirically-Based Curriculum
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This curriculum, which may be used in whole or in part, offers an overview of kinship care including a brief historical context for this resource, funding associated with kinship care, and some of the legal issues that have shaped kinship care policy. Characteristics of kinship care providers and children are presented, along with a thorough examination of outcomes associated with kinship care. In addition, data on the number of children in foster care, kinship care in the context of the larger out-of-home care population, outcomes associated with kinship care versus non-kin care, and the discrepancy between AFDC and AFDC-FC payments in California and the role these differential payment rates may play in kinship care outcomes are provided. Last, child welfare workers' views about the primary differences between kinship foster parents and foster family parents, and changes in policy and practice are considered. (188 pages)Berrick, J. D., Needell, B., & Barth, R. P. (1995).

Subject:
Social Work
Material Type:
Module
Author:
CalSWEC
Date Added:
03/02/2018
Legal Guardianship and Child Welfare in California: An Empirically Based Curriculum
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This curriculum on legal guardianship created by the permanency planning process can be used in whole or in part. It offers an overview of legal guardianship, including its history, role in the implementation of permanency planning, and some of the issues surrounding its use. In addition, it shares data collected from a focus group of California child welfare workers that candidly share the ways day-to-day practice differs from stated policy and discuss their views of how and why guardianship operates in the child welfare arena. A survey of county child welfare staff covers transracial placements, emancipation outcomes, and the details of the process in which the decision to recommend guardianship is made. (118 pages)Simmons, B., & Barth, R. P. (1995).

Subject:
Social Work
Material Type:
Module
Author:
CalSWEC
Date Added:
03/02/2018
Non-Violent Conflict Management: Conflict Resolution, Dealing with Anger, Negotiation and Mediation
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Conflict is inevitable and if unresolved, has negative impacts that reach far beyond the principal parties. Managing conflict in a non-violent manner can increase the ability of everyone involved to work more effectively with clients, staff, and other personnel. This module teaches conflict management through a combination of skill-building and philosophical discussion to enable participants to become invested in the idea that non-violent conflict management is better, more effective, and more efficacious in the long run than either conflict avoidance or an aggressive approach that produces "winners" and "losers." The material can be presented in training sessions of varying lengths from one class to an entire semester. The author recommends separating the three modules over time to allow time for integration of skills. (95 pages)Rice, S. (2000).

Subject:
Social Work
Material Type:
Module
Author:
CalSWEC
Date Added:
03/01/2018
Pathways to Collaboration: Factors That Help and Hinder Collaboration Between Substance Abuse and Child Welfare Fields
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Research over the past decade has documented a strong relationship between substance abuse and problems of child abuse and neglect. Although many data collection systems do not gather accurate data on substance abuse and child welfare, most studies in the U.S. suggest parental substance abuse is a factor in one third to two-thirds of child involvement in the child welfare system. Parental substance abuse appears to be strongly associated with higher rates of physical abuse or neglect among families in community samples, higher rates of substantiated child maltreatment in cases referred into child welfare, higher rates of out-of-home placements, re-reports of abuse, and reentry into foster care. This study examined factors that help and hinder the process of collaboration based on in-depth interviews with respondents from substance abuse and child welfare fields working in five California counties with established formal collaborative policies and programs. This curriculum, which is grounded in the findings from the study, provides highlights of research and experiential activities in four primary areas that may be used independently or in combination: (a) overview of research on cross-systems collaboration, (b) promising models and elements for collaborative practice, (c) factors that help and hinder collaboration, and (d) facilitating communication and dealing with confidentiality issues across systems. (161 pages)Drabble, L., Osterling, K. L., Tweed, M., & Pearce, C. A. (2008).

Subject:
Social Work
Material Type:
Module
Author:
CalSWEC
Date Added:
03/01/2018
Process reflection by social worker: separating fact and evidence from assessment and opinion
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In this interactive document a learner can read the case notes taken during an investigative interview. The interview can be viewed at . Reading through the document, the objective is that the learner listen to audio explanations of the social worker, considering why decisions were made to include, and to exclude, specific information. Hovering over a section of the document will darken that section of the text. Click on that section to hear what decisions the social worker made in an effort to clearly separate fact and evidence from assessment and opinion while writing her case notes.

Subject:
Social Work
Material Type:
Interactive
Provider:
California Social Work Education Center (CalSWEC)
Date Added:
07/25/2016
The Relationship Between Reunification Services, Service Utilization, and Successful Reunification 
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This curriculum offers an empirically based instruction tool for child welfare social workers or other related practitioners on family reunification services: the historical groundings and legal frameworks; the types of services that are offered to parents; factors associated with parents’ use of services; and information on the effectiveness of services. The curriculum blends a literature review of current knowledge with a study on family reunification services, with the intent to provide contextual information to aid social workers in the development of appropriate and responsible case plans for parents receiving reunification services in the child welfare system. (158 pages) Vugia, H., Osterling, K. L., D'Andrade, A. (2009).

Subject:
Social Work
Material Type:
Module
Author:
CalSWEC
Date Added:
03/01/2018
The Retention of Public Child Welfare Workers.
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This curriculum is intended to help child welfare workers, administrators, and policy-makers increase the job retention of public child welfare caseworkers. California’s statewide shortage of social workers is expected worsen, and the field of public child welfare is facing its own acute shortage of social work personnel. More important, high turnover rates in child welfare agencies are a major obstacle to timely investigations, compromising the ability of agencies to protect children. The retention of public child welfare workers is an immediate pressing professional and practical concern, and this curriculum points directly to specific solutions to the problem. (58 pages)Weaver, D., Chang, J., & Gil de Gibaja, M. (2006).

Subject:
Social Work
Material Type:
Module
Author:
CalSWEC
Date Added:
03/01/2018
Strategies for Identifying & Assessing Children with Sexually Abusive Behavior Problems: Part One: Two Curriculum Modules
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Module I discusses effects of sexual abuse trauma on young children; describes the adverse effects of sexual abuse trauma and the role of past victimization experiences in motivating sexual acting out; includes a literature review; and covers affective, cognitive, and behavioral effects. Two practice models that explain the effects of abuse are discussed and compared, and an integrative treatment model is introduced. Module II discusses childhood sexual development, reviews research on sexual behavior problems in children, presents research findings about normative sexual development in children as well as criteria differentiating sexually abusive behavior problems from age-appropriate sex play, includes experiential exercises on sexual values, and reviews and discusses clinical and research methods used to classify types of children with sexual behavior problems. Each module contains learning objectives, suggested readings, an outline of issues addressed in the module, and suggestions for teaching the module in the classroom and in field practicum. (143 pages)Rasmusssen, L. (2000).

Subject:
Social Work
Material Type:
Module
Author:
CalSWEC
Date Added:
03/01/2018
Structured Decision Making® and Child Welfare Service Delivery Project
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This curriculum examines the types of decisions child welfare workers are required to make, the factors that influence their decision-making patterns, and various approaches that could potentially improve decision making on both an individual and organizational level. To further explore the issues surrounding decision making, the curriculum focuses specifically on Structured Decision Making® (SDM®), a model that can be used to assist social workers in making accurate and consistent decisions about the levels of risk for maltreatment found in families, to provide guidance about service provision, and to assist with reunification and permanency planning. In 1999, the State of California decided to make SDM® a required tool for child welfare agencies statewide, and SDM® has since been implemented in several counties, including Los Angeles. To explore the implementation and effects of SDM®and its implications on child welfare decision making, the authors conducted a multi-level study in conjunction with the Los Angeles County Department of Children and Family Services. The study addressed three central questions: (a) what are the challenges related to implementing the full SDM® model in the Los Angeles County Department of Children and Family Services (DCFS), (b) what impact does implementation of the full SDM® model have on child welfare service delivery, and (c) what impact does implementation of the full SDM® model have on child permanency outcomes? (254 pages) Kim, A. K., Brooks, D., Kim, H., & Nissly, J. (2008).

Subject:
Social Work
Material Type:
Module
Author:
CalSWEC
Date Added:
03/01/2018
Successful Intervention With Substance Abusers
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This program explores the correlation between the reduction of the incidence of substance abuse and the reduction of the incidence of child abuse. Estimates indicate that 40-60% of child abuse cases are substance abuse related; yet, meager resources and attention are directed toward alleviating the problem. This tape offers six elements that provide a framework for successful intervention with substance abusers. Three role-playing scenarios show how these elements are incorporated into situations that social workers encounter in the field, translating classroom learning into practice. (28 minutes)San Diego State University. (1994).

Subject:
Social Work
Material Type:
Module
Author:
CalSWEC
Date Added:
03/02/2018
Trauma Advocacy with Mental Health Systems (MHS)
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This is an intermediate level module for undergraduate or graduate level social work students, or for public child welfare staff with some exposure to Trauma Informed Practice. It presents information about trauma related vocabulary, the Mental Health System, advocacy and DSM V trauma related diagnoses.

Learning objects addressed in this module are:

1. Describe the importance of MH Intervention for trauma survivors
2. Identify MH vocabulary regarding trauma and referrals
3. Describe MH service options
4. Describe the basic DSM V Trauma/Stressor Diagnostic Labels
5. Apply a basic MH risk assessment
6. Complete a best practice case-based MH advocacy, referral, and follow-up plan

The module consists of slides introducing the content, 9 self-assessment quiz questions with feedback for incorrect responses, and a list of references and resources for further study. To support learning of new terminology, a summary sheet of vocabulary common to mental health services is provided as a downloadable attachment. The module can be used as a self-study professional development resource or to supplement an in-person course.

Subject:
Social Work
Material Type:
Assessment
Interactive
Module
Provider:
California Social Work Education Center (CalSWEC)
Date Added:
08/02/2016
Use of Cultural Brokers As an Approach to Community Engagement With African American Families in Child Welfare.
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This empirically based curriculum addresses a number of issues related to disparity and disproportionality experienced by African American families involved with child welfare. It is well documented that for decades African American children have been overrepresented in child welfare throughout this country. Yet little is known about what strategies might be implemented in order to reverse this phenomenon. This curriculum is based on findings from a Community-Based Participatory Research Project that brought together African American community leaders and university faculty to examine both the historical evolution and prominent features of a cultural broker approach to promote engagement and partnership with the African American community and the county child welfare agency. This curriculum provides research highlights, historical perspectives, conceptual frameworks, approaches for community engagement, tools and experiential opportunities to strengthen social worker understanding, and knowledge and skills regarding issues related to disproportionality and disparity experienced by African American families in child welfare. It addresses five areas: the history of cultural racism and oppression in child welfare, the prevalence of racial disparities and disproportionality in child welfare, the role of community partnership and collaboration with African American families in child welfare service delivery, the cultural broker approach to community engagement in child welfare practice, and key considerations for improved child welfare partnerships with African American communities. (108 pages) Siegel, D., Jackson, M., Montana, S., & Rondero Hernandez, V. (2011).

Subject:
Social Work
Material Type:
Module
Author:
CalSWEC
Date Added:
02/26/2018
Using Publicly Available Data to Engage IV-E Students in Research and Statistics: Instructional Modules.
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Increasingly, public agencies are adopting models of self-assessment in which administrative data are used to guide and then continuously evaluate the implementation of programs and policies. In California, public child welfare agencies track performance outcomes spanning a range of child safety, permanency, and well-being domains, as dictated by federal and state mandates. This curriculum has been designed to provide Title IV-E and others students interested in public child welfare systems with an overview of the state’s Child Welfare Outcomes and Accountability System. Students will be provided with hands-on opportunities to become experienced and “statistically literate” users of aggregate, public child welfare data from the state’s administrative child welfare system, attending to the often missing link between data/research and practice. This curriculum is organized into five teaching modules, providing instructors with student learning activities, PowerPoint slide presentations, and other materials to support graduate IV-E students in the development of practical data analysis skills. Materials focus on publicly available data hosted through the Child Welfare Indicators Project at the University of California at Berkeley, a long-standing agency/university data partnership: http://cssr.berkeley.edu/ucb_childwelfare. CalSWEC funding for the development of this curriculum was provided to the Child Welfare Performance Indicators Project. Modules were developed to support instructors of both first- and second-year MSW research courses. Module objectives include: (a) to support student (and instructor) understanding of California's child welfare system performance goals and progress to date; (b) to develop students who have highly desirable (and practical) data analysis skills, including the ability to intelligibly distill and present numerical findings; and (c) to prepare a cohort of IV-E MSW students equipped to adopt leadership roles in county child welfare agencies, bringing with them an appreciation for how data can be used to improve practice and inform policies. Putnam-Hornstein, E., Needell, B., Lery, B., King, B., & Weigmann, W. (2013).

Subject:
Social Work
Material Type:
Module
Author:
CalSWEC
Date Added:
02/26/2018