Keywords: Astronomy (2425)

save
save to

Please log in to save materials.

selected filters:
Aerosols from Nimbus 7 TOMS: Transatlantic Dust Event in 1983

Aerosols from Nimbus 7 TOMS: Transatlantic Dust Event in 1983

Saharan dust storms raise dust that is carried in the upper atmosphere ... (more)

Saharan dust storms raise dust that is carried in the upper atmosphere across the Atlantic Ocean. That dust can land as far west as the Caribbean and the Americas. This dust can carry potentially hazardous bacteria and fungi. (less)

Subject:
Science and Technology
Material Type:
Other
Collection:
NASA GSFC Scientific Visualization Studio
Provider:
NASA
Author:
Jay Herman
Michael Mangos
No Strings Attached
Africa: Showing the Changing Seasons

Africa: Showing the Changing Seasons

SeaWiFS false color data showing seasonal change in the oceans and on ... (more)

SeaWiFS false color data showing seasonal change in the oceans and on land for Africa. The data is seasonally averaged, and shows spring, summer, fall, winter, spring, summer, and fall. (less)

Subject:
Science and Technology
Material Type:
Other
Collection:
NASA GSFC Scientific Visualization Studio
Provider:
NASA
Author:
Gene Feldman
Jesse Allen
Marte Newcombe
No Strings Attached
African Dust Sequence

African Dust Sequence

A 48 hour dust storm on March 1 and 2, 2003 is ... (more)

A 48 hour dust storm on March 1 and 2, 2003 is responsible for a very large dust transport over the Atlantic on March 2 through March 6, 2003. This animation starts with a global view of the world and zooms into the storm area. (less)

Subject:
Science and Technology
Material Type:
Other
Collection:
NASA GSFC Scientific Visualization Studio
Provider:
NASA
Author:
Greg Shirah
Horace Mitchell
Lori Perkins
Marte Newcombe
Vincent Salomonson
No Strings Attached
African Fires during 2002 (WMS)

African Fires during 2002 (WMS)

This animation shows fire activity in Africa from January 1, 2002 to ... (more)

This animation shows fire activity in Africa from January 1, 2002 to December 31, 2002. The fires are shown as tiny particles with each particle depicting the geographic region in which fire was detected. The color of a particle represents the number of days since a sizable amount of fire was detected in that region, with red representing less than 20 days, orange representing 20 to 40 days, yellow representing 40 to 60 days, and gray to black representing more than 60 days. This data was measured by the MODIS instrument on the Terra satellite. MODIS detects fires by measuring the brightness temperature of a region in several frequency bands and looking for hot spots where this temperature is greater than the surrounding region. (less)

Subject:
Science and Technology
Material Type:
Other
Collection:
NASA GSFC Scientific Visualization Studio
Provider:
NASA
Author:
Chris Justice
Cindy Starr
Eric Sokolowsky
Robert Sohlberg
No Strings Attached
African Vegetation: Comparing August 1984 and August 1994

African Vegetation: Comparing August 1984 and August 1994

For many years, scientists have believed that the southern expansion of the ... (more)

For many years, scientists have believed that the southern expansion of the Sahara has been due to human activity. However, results from the AVHRR instrument and its measurements of vegetation suggest a different explanation: rainfall patterns. In drier years (1984 was one of the driest summers in recorded history in Northern Africa), the Sahara expands south, but in wetter years (such as 1994), vegetation moves back and there is no net expansion of the Sahara as had been previously suggested. (less)

Subject:
Science and Technology
Material Type:
Other
Collection:
NASA GSFC Scientific Visualization Studio
Provider:
NASA
Author:
Compton Tucker
Jesse Allen
Sharon Nicholson
No Strings Attached
African Vegetation: Comparing July 1984 and July 1994

African Vegetation: Comparing July 1984 and July 1994

For many years, scientists have believed that the southern expansion of the ... (more)

For many years, scientists have believed that the southern expansion of the Sahara has been due to human activity. However, results from the AVHRR instrument and its measurements of vegetation suggest a different explanation: rainfall patterns. In drier years (1984 was one of the driest summers in recorded history in Northern Africa), the Sahara expands south, but in wetter years (such as 1994), vegetation moves back and there is no net expansion of the Sahara as had been previously suggested. (less)

Subject:
Science and Technology
Material Type:
Other
Collection:
NASA GSFC Scientific Visualization Studio
Provider:
NASA
Author:
Compton Tucker
Jesse Allen
Sharon Nicholson
No Strings Attached