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Draft - Introduction To Computer Applications
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
Rating
1.0 stars

The focus of this class is on learning the basics of commonly used computer applications, web concepts, multimedia, and general digital literacy to prepare you for living a digital life. Students will be able to navigate basic computer functions, MS Office Suite, Google Workspace, and social media websites. The course is designed to gain and enhance students' abilities to effectively apply digital tools, technologies, and resources to communicate ideas and solve problems. Students will learn how to navigate, evaluate, create, and critically apply information by using a wide variety of applications such as MS Word, MS Excel, PowerPoint, Prezi, and social media platforms.  This course will also provide guidance on the professional and ethical application of these tools.

Subject:
Information Science
Material Type:
Module
Author:
Aleshia Hayes
Deborah Bockman
Date Added:
05/03/2022
Here Comes the Hurricane! Saving Lives through Logical Reasoning and Computer Science
Read the Fine Print
Educational Use
Rating
4.0 stars

Students use a hurricane tracking map to measure the distance from a specific latitude and longitude location of the eye of a hurricane to a city. Then they use the map's scale factor to convert the distance to miles. They also apply the distance formula by creating an x-y coordinate plane on the map. Students are challenged to analyze what data might be used by computer science engineers to write code that generates hurricane tracking models. Then students analyze a MATLAB® computer code that uses the distance formula repetitively to generate a table of data that tracks a hurricane at specific time intervals. Students come to realize that using a computer program to generate the calculations (instead of by hand) is very advantageous for a dynamic situation like tracking storm movements. Their inspection of some MATLAB code helps them understand how it communicates what to do using mathematical formulas, logical instructions and repeated tasks. They also conclude that the example program is too simplistic to really be a useful tool; useful computer model tools must necessarily be much more complex.

Subject:
Engineering
Atmospheric Science
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Provider:
TeachEngineering
Provider Set:
TeachEngineering
Author:
Armando Vital
Fritz Claydon
Justin Chang
K. B. Nakshatrala
Rodrigues
Stuart Long
Date Added:
09/18/2014
The Internet (04:05): Cloud Computing
Only Sharing Permitted
CC BY-ND
Rating
0.0 stars

The final video in our series on the Internet. In this one we look at what is cloud computing as well as some example of how cloud computing makes your life so much cooler.

We also present our top website to check out.

Links from the video:
-w3schools http://www.w3schools.com/
-HostGator http://www.hostgator.com/
-Bitly https://bitly.com/
-Google URL Shortener http://goo.gl/
-The IT Crowd - Series 3 - Episode 4: The Internet -http://youtu.be/iDbyYGrswtg
-Paul Soares Jr. https://www.youtube.com/user/paulsoaresjr

Subject:
Computer Science
Material Type:
Lecture
Provider:
Mr. Ford's Class
Author:
Scott Ford
Date Added:
09/26/2014
A First Course in Electrical and Computer Engineering
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
Rating
0.0 stars

This book was written for an experimental freshman course at the University of Colorado. The course is now an elective that the majority of our electrical and computer engineering students take in the second semester of their freshman year, just before their first circuits course. Our department decided to offer this course for several reasons:

we wanted to pique student' interest in engineering by acquainting them with engineering teachers early in their university careers and by providing with exposure to the types of problems that electrical and computer engineers are asked to solve;
we wanted students entering the electrical and computer engineering programs to be prepared in complex analysis, phasors, and linear algebra, topics that are of fundamental importance in our discipline;
we wanted students to have an introduction to a software application tool, such as MATLAB, to complete their preparation for practical and efficient computing in their subsequent courses and in their professional careers;
we wanted students to make early contact with advanced topics like vector graphics, filtering, and binary coding so that they would gain a more rounded picture of modern electrical and computer engineering.
In order to introduce this course, we had to sacrifice a second semester of Pascal programming. We concluded that the sacrifice was worth making because we found that most of our students were prepared for high-level language computing after just one semester of programming.

We believe engineering educators elsewhere are reaching similar conclusions about their own students and curriculums. We hope this book helps create a much needed dialogue about curriculum revision and that it leads to the development of similar introductory courses that encourage students to enter and practice our craft.Students electing to take this course have completed one semester of calculus, computer programming, chemistry, and humanities.

Concurrently with this course, students take physics and a second semester of calculus, as well as a second semester in the humanities. By omitting the advanced topics marked by asterisks, we are able to cover Complex Numbers through Linear Algebra, plus two of the three remaining chapters. The book is organized so that the instructor can select any two of the three. If every chapter of this book is covered, including the advanced topics, then enough material exists for a two-semester course.

The first three chapters of this book provide a fairly complete coverage of complex numbers, the functions e^x and e^jand phasors. Our department philosophy is that these topics must be understood if a student is to succeed in electrical and computer engineering. These three chapters may also be used as a supplement to a circuits course. A measured pace of presentation, taking between sixteen and eighteen lectures, is sufficient to cover all but the advanced sections in Complex Numbers through Phasors.

The chapter on "linear algebra" is prerequisite for all subsequent chapters. We use eight to ten lectures to cover it. We devote twelve to sixteen lectures to cover topics from Vector Graphics through Binary Codes. (We assume a semester consisting of 42 lectures and three exams.) The chapter on vector graphics applies the linear algebra learned in the previous chapter to the problem of translating, scaling, and rotating images. "Filtering" introduces the student to basic ideas in averaging and filtering. The chapter on "Binary Codes" covers the rudiments of binary coding, including Huffman codes and Hamming codes.

If the users of this book find "Vector Graphics" through "Binary Codes" too confining, we encourage them to supplement the essential material in "Complex Numbers" through "Linear Algebra" with their own course notes on additional topics. Within electrical and computer engineering there are endless possibilities. Practically any set of topics that can be taught with conviction and enthusiasm will whet the student's appetite. We encourage you to write to us or to our editor, Tom Robbins, about your ideas for additional topics. We would like to think that our book and its subsequent editions will have an open architecture that enables us to accommodate a wide range of student and faculty interests.

Throughout this book we have used MATLAB programs to illustrate key ideas. MATLAB is an interactive, matrix-oriented language that is ideally suited to circuit analysis, linear systems, control theory, communications, linear algebra, and numerical analysis. MATLAB is rapidly becoming a standard software tool in universities and engineering companies. (For more information about MATLAB, return the attached card in the back of this book to The MathWorks, Inc.) MATLAB programs are designed to develop the student's ability to solve meaningful problems, compute, and plot in a high-level applications language. Our students get started in MATLAB by working through “An Introduction to MATLAB,” while seated at an IBM PC (or look-alike) or an Apple Macintosh. We also have them run through the demonstration programs in "Complex Numbers". Each week we give three classroom lectures and conduct a one-hour computer lab session. Students use this lab session to hone MATLAB skills, to write programs, or to conduct the numerical experiments that are given at the end of each chapter. We require that these experiments be carried out and then reported in a short lab report that contains (i) introduction, (ii) analytical computations, (iii) computer code, (iv) experimental results, and (v) conclusions. The quality of the numerical results and the computer graphics astonishes students. Solutions to the chapter problems are available from the publisher for instructors who adopt this text for classroom use.

We wish to acknowledge our late colleague Richard Roberts, who encouraged us to publish this book, and Michael Lightner and Ruth Ravenel, who taught "Linear Algebra" and "Vector Graphics" and offered helpful suggestions on the manuscript. We thank C. T. Mullis for allowing us to use his notes on binary codes to guide our writing of "Binary Codes". We thank Cédric Demeure and Peter Massey for their contributions to the writing of "An Introduction to MATLAB" and "The Edix Editor". We thank Tom Robbins, our editor at Addison-Wesley, for his encouragement, patience, and many suggestions. We are especially grateful to Julie Fredlund, who composed this text through many drafts and improved it in many ways. We thank her for preparing an excellent manuscript for production.

Subject:
Computer Science
Engineering
Material Type:
Textbook
Provider:
Rice University
Provider Set:
OpenStax CNX
Author:
Louis Scharf
Date Added:
11/26/2019
Telecommunication (05:05): Computer Networks (part 2)
Only Sharing Permitted
CC BY-ND
Rating
0.0 stars

We conclude out look at telecommunications and computer networks. We also give our list of additional resources to check out.

Links from Video:
-Wifi Analyzer https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.farproc.wifi.analyzer
-Cisco Networking Academy https://www.netacad.com/
-Monoprice http://www.monoprice.com

Subject:
Computer Science
Material Type:
Lecture
Provider:
Mr. Ford's Class
Author:
Scott Ford
Date Added:
09/26/2014
Digital World (01:01):  Introduction to Computers
Only Sharing Permitted
CC BY-ND
Rating
0.0 stars

Our first lesson in our FREE Introduction to Computers/ Business Computers Information Systems (BCIS) course.

This video will introduce new students to this series and what they can expect.
Our first lesson in our FREE Introduction to Computers/ Business Computers Information Systems (BCIS) course.

This video will introduce new students to this series and what they can expect.
Our first lesson in our FREE Introduction to Computers/ Business Computers Information Systems (BCIS) course.

This video will introduce new students to this series and what they can expect.

Subject:
Computer Science
Material Type:
Lecture
Provider:
Mr. Ford's Class
Author:
Scott Ford
Date Added:
09/25/2014
A Primer for Computational Biology
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC-SA
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0.0 stars

A Primer for Computational Biology aims to provide life scientists and students the skills necessary for research in a data-rich world. The text covers accessing and using remote servers via the command-line, writing programs and pipelines for data analysis, and provides useful vocabulary for interdisciplinary work. The book is broken into three parts:

Introduction to Unix/Linux: The command-line is the “natural environment” of scientific computing, and this part covers a wide range of topics, including logging in, working with files and directories, installing programs and writing scripts, and the powerful “pipe” operator for file and data manipulation.
Programming in Python: Python is both a premier language for learning and a common choice in scientific software development. This part covers the basic concepts in programming (data types, if-statements and loops, functions) via examples of DNA-sequence analysis. This part also covers more complex subjects in software development such as objects and classes, modules, and APIs.
Programming in R: The R language specializes in statistical data analysis, and is also quite useful for visualizing large datasets. This third part covers the basics of R as a programming language (data types, if-statements, functions, loops and when to use them) as well as techniques for large-scale, multi-test analyses. Other topics include S3 classes and data visualization with ggplot2.

Subject:
Biology
Material Type:
Textbook
Provider:
Oregon State University
Author:
Shawn T. O’Neil
Date Added:
01/06/2020
Intro to Physical Computing in English Class: micro:bits
Only Sharing Permitted
CC BY-NC-ND
Rating
0.0 stars

This highly engaging lesson focuses on helping students to follow complex multi-step directions to program a micro:Bit in an Hour of Code™ activity related to an informative article. It uses micro:bit Go educational kits and easy JavaScript block coding. The micro:bit is a miniature programmable computer with 25 LED lights that was created by the BBC to introduce children in England to computing. It is available for purchase in the U.S. This lesson meets the 2014 Nebraska Language Arts Standard 8.3.2.c (among others).

Subject:
Computer Science
English Language Arts
Reading Informational Text
Speaking and Listening
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Author:
Becky Fendrick
Date Added:
03/13/2019
Galileo: His Place in Science
Read the Fine Print
Educational Use
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0.0 stars

Einstein called Galileo the "father of modern physics." This media-rich essay from the NOVA Web site looks at Galileo's quest to understand the mathematics of motion.

Subject:
Chemistry
Physics
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Provider:
PBS LearningMedia
Provider Set:
PBS Learning Media: Multimedia Resources for the Classroom and Professional Development
Author:
National Science Foundation
WGBH Educational Foundation
Date Added:
01/29/2004
Computer Hardware (02:02): Processors
Only Sharing Permitted
CC BY-ND
Rating
0.0 stars

Before keyboards, printers, even monitors there was processing. Processing is the reason computers are computers. Processing is the ability of the computer to take in raw data and basically make sense of it.

In this video we look at: Microprocessor (CPUs), Moore's Law, and Motherboard.

Subject:
Information Science
Material Type:
Lecture
Provider:
Mr. Ford's Class
Author:
Scott Ford
Date Added:
09/25/2014
Computer Hardware (02:03): Storage
Only Sharing Permitted
CC BY-ND
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We examine storage devices in computers. This storage lecture has been broken up into to two section, this one focuses on hard drives and RAM, the next video covered removable storage devices.

Subject:
Information Science
Material Type:
Lecture
Provider:
Mr. Ford's Class
Author:
Scott Ford
Date Added:
09/25/2014
CIS 101 - Computer Fundamentals - OER (Public) Version
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC
Rating
0.0 stars

In this course, students will learn basic Microsoft Windows 10 Operating Systems skills (including Core PC Hardware Components, Graphical User Interface, Local and Cloud File Management, Applications, Internet Browsers, Security, and key System Utilities), Google Email, Contacts, Calendar, and Drive applications, as well as introduction to Word Processing, Spreadsheet and Presentation applications. Additionally, students will learn to create and convert documents between different format (Microsoft and Google apps).

Subject:
Computer Science
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
Linn-Benton Community College
Author:
Ziko Rizk
Date Added:
03/29/2016
Digital World (01:04): What is a Computer
Only Sharing Permitted
CC BY-ND
Rating
0.0 stars

The fourth and final video in our Lesson 1 Digital World series looks at what exactly is a computer. We take a quick look at the history of the PC, the general components of a computer and answer the question "what kind of computer should I buy."

Our next lesson series, will focus on computer hardware.

Links from video:
http://lifehacker.com/
http://www.thinkgeek.com/
http://www.techguylabs.com/
http://www.digitalliteracy.gov/

Subject:
Information Science
Material Type:
Lecture
Provider:
Mr. Ford's Class
Author:
Scott Ford
Date Added:
09/25/2014
Computer Software (03:01): Software Basics
Only Sharing Permitted
CC BY-ND
Rating
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The first video in the Computer Software series, part of our Introduction to Computers course. This video looks at the general types of software, software development, the software development life cycle, as well as explains what computer programers do.

Subject:
Information Science
Material Type:
Lecture
Provider:
Mr. Ford's Class
Author:
Scott Ford
Date Added:
09/25/2014
Computer Hardware (02:06): Output Devices
Only Sharing Permitted
CC BY-ND
Rating
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Our last video in our Computer Hardware lesson, part of the Introduction to Computers course.

This video looks at the most common output devices found on a computer we also list out top 5 resources, be sure to check them out.

http://arstechnica.com/
http://www.cnet.com/
http://www.newegg.com/
http://www.tigerdirect.com/
http://www.tomshardware.com/

Subject:
Information Science
Material Type:
Lecture
Provider:
Mr. Ford's Class
Author:
Scott Ford
Date Added:
09/25/2014
Computer Software (03:02): Boot Process
Only Sharing Permitted
CC BY-ND
Rating
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Welcome to one of the most geeky videos in the entire series. This video will introduce you to the computer boot process, the way a computer starts from the moment you turn the computer on, till the operating system kicks in.

Subject:
Information Science
Material Type:
Lecture
Provider:
Mr. Ford's Class
Author:
Scott Ford
Date Added:
09/25/2014
Computer Software (03:05): Application Software
Only Sharing Permitted
CC BY-ND
Rating
0.0 stars

Our last video in the Computer Software lesson, part of our Introduction to Computers curriculum.

In this video we look at the types of application users can find. We talk about business software and personal software. We also give our 3-5 to picks for viewers to check out.

Links from video:
http://www.lynda.com/
http://teamtreehouse.com/
https://www.udemy.com/courses/
https://evernote.com/
http://www.openoffice.org/
http://www.mozilla.org/en-US/thunderbird/
http://bricklin.com/history/vcexecutable.htm
http://www.cultofmac.com/90060/how-to-completely-uninstall-software-under-mac-os-x-macrx/
https://reporting.bsa.org/r/report/add.aspx?src=us&ln=en-us

Subject:
Information Science
Material Type:
Lecture
Provider:
Mr. Ford's Class
Author:
Scott Ford
Date Added:
09/25/2014