West Shore School District

The West Shore School District is the second largest suburban school district in the Greater Harrisburg metropolitan area. The District is located in southcentral Pennsylvania across the Susquehanna River from Harrisburg, the state capital. Home to approximately 7,800 students and 950 staff members in Cumberland and York counties, West Shore covers 78 square miles of rural, suburban, commercial, and industrial regions. The goal of the WSSD OER Group is to curate and share resources using the OER Commons.
41 members | 240 affiliated resources

All resources in West Shore School District

52 Minute Challenge

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Students get one class period (52 minutes) to find a real problem on campus, document it, develop a solution and prepare a market-based presentation to be peer-reviewed the next day. The main goal of this project is to highlight the importance of collaboration when working under a tight deadline - a common situation in today's working world. This project integrates engineering, design and business concepts and meets learning standards from 9th to 12th grade.

Material Type: Assessment, Interactive, Lecture, Lesson Plan, Simulation, Teaching/Learning Strategy

Ancient History Encyclopedia

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Ancient History Encyclopedia is a non-profit educational website with a global vision: to provide the best ancient history information on the internet for free.

Material Type: Diagram/Illustration, Homework/Assignment, Interactive, Reading, Textbook

The Human Past: Introduction to Archaeology, Fall 2006

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Archaeology reconstructs ancient human activities and their environmental contexts. Drawing on case studies in contrasting environmental settings from the Near East and Mesoamerica, considers these activities and the forces that shaped them. In laboratory sessions students encounter various classes of archaeological data and analyze archaeological artifacts made from materials such as stone, bone, ceramics, glass, and metal. These analyses help reconstruct the past. This class introduces the multidisciplinary nature of archaeology, both in theory and practice. Lectures provide a comparative examination of the origins of agriculture and the rise of early civilizations in the ancient Near East and Mesoamerica. The laboratory sessions provide practical experience in aspects of archaeological field methods and analytical techniques including the examination of stone, ceramic, and metal artifacts and bone materials. Lab sessions have occasional problem sets which are completed outside of class.

Material Type: Full Course

Author: Harry Merrick

4a. Life in Sumer

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Located in what the ancient Greeks called Mesopotamia, which literally means "the land between the rivers," Sumer was a collection of city-states that occupied the southernmost portion of Mesopotamia. Most were situated along the Tigris and Euphrates Rivers, lying just north of the Persian Gulf.

Material Type: Diagram/Illustration, Reading

4b. Babylonia

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The Babylonians used the innovations of the Sumerians, added to them, and built an empire that gave the world, among other things, codified laws, a tower that soared above the earth, and one of the Seven Wonders of the World.

Material Type: Diagram/Illustration, Reading

The Ancient City of Petra

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This fun Web article is part of OLogy, where kids can collect virtual trading cards and create projects with them. Here, they learn about the ancient city of Petra. The article begins with an overview of this city, which was located along the ancient trade routes between Arabia, Egypt, and the Mediterranean Sea. Kids then have the chance to take a walk through Petra's ruins. This clickable illustration has 11 places for them to explore. The article concludes with an extensive information section on the history of the city.

Material Type: Diagram/Illustration, Interactive

Ancient Civilizations of the World

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In this course, the student will study the emergence of the major civilizations of the ancient world, beginning with the Paleolithic Era (about 2.5 million years ago) and finishing with the end of the Middle Ages in fifteenth century A.D. The student will pay special attention to how societies evolved across this expanse of time - from fragmented and primitive agricultural communities to more advanced and consolidated civilizations. By the end of the course, the student will possess a thorough understanding of important overarching social, political, religious, and economic themes in the ancient world, ranging from the emergence of Confucian philosophy in Asia to the fall of imperial Rome. Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to: Identify and define the world's earliest civilizations, including the Neolithic Revolution, and describe how it shaped the development of these early civilizations; Identify, describe, and compare/contrast the first advanced civilizations in the world - Mesopotamia and Egypt; Identify and describe the emergence of the earliest civilizations in Asia: the Harappan and Aryan societies on the Indian subcontinent and the Shang and Zhou societies in China; Identify and describe the emergence of new philosophies - Daoism and Confucianism - during the Warring States period in China. Identify and describe the subsequent rise of the Qin and Han dynasties; Identify and describe the different periods that characterized ancient Greece - Archaic Greece (or the Greek Dark Ages), classical Greece, and the Hellenistic era; Identify and describe the characteristics of the Roman Kingdom, the Roman Republic, and Imperial Rome; Analyze the emergence of the Mauryan and Gupta empires during the 'classical age' in India; Identify and analyze the Buddhist and Vedic (Hindu) faiths; Identify and describe the rise of civilizations in the Americas, particularly in Meso and South America; Analyze and describe the rise of Islam in the Middle East; Identify and describe the emergence of the Arab caliphate, the Umayyad dynasty, and Abbasid dynasty; Identify and describe the rise and fall of the Byzantine Empire; Identify and analyze key facets of medieval society in Western EuropeĺÎĺĚ_ĺÜthe Catholic Church, feudalism, and the rise of technology and commerce; Analyze and interpret primary-source documents that elucidate the exchanges and advancements made in civilizations across time and space. (History 101)

Material Type: Assessment, Full Course, Lecture, Reading, Syllabus

The Silk Road and Central Eurasia

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This course will introduce the student to the history of Central Eurasia and the Silk Road from 4500 B.C.E to the nineteenth century. The student will learn about the culture of the nomadic peoples of Central Eurasia as well as the development of the Silk Road. By the end of the course, the student will understand how the Silk Road influenced the development of nomadic societies in Central Eurasia as well as powerful empires in China, the Middle East, and Europe. Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to: identify and describe the emergence of early nomadic cultures in Central Eurasia; identify and describe the rise of silk production in China; identify and describe the various routes of the Silk Road; identify and describe the reasons for China's opening of the Silk Road in the second century; identify and describe Han China's political and commercial relationships with nomadic tribes in Central Eurasia; identify and describe the impact of the Hellenistic World and the Roman Empire on the Silk Road; describe and analyze the 'golden age' of the Silk Road; identify and describe the impact of the Mongol Empire on Silk Road cultures; identify and describe the transmission of art, religion, and technology via the Silk Road; analyze and describe the arrival of European traders and explorers seeking a 'new' silk route in the 1400s; identify and describe the 'Great Game' rivalry between China, Britain, and Russia in Central Eurasia in the nineteenth century; analyze and interpret primary source documents that elucidate political, economic, and cultural exchange along the Silk Road. (History 341)

Material Type: Assessment, Full Course, Lecture, Reading, Syllabus, Textbook

8b. The Caste System

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If a Hindu person were asked to explain the nature of the caste system, he or she might start to tell the story of Brahma — the four-headed, four-handed deity worshipped as the creator of the universe.

Material Type: Diagram/Illustration, Reading

9e. Taoism and Confucianism — Ancient Philosophies

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The 6th century B.C.E. was an amazing time of philosophical growth for ancient China. It was during that time that the two most influential spiritual leaders native to China, Confucius and Lao-tzu, are thought to have lived and taught. The philosophies that they practiced, Taoism and Confucianism, existed simultaneously in dynastic China, attracting countless numbers of followers over the past 2,500 years. The fascination of both the Eastern and Western worlds with these two legendary figures and the philosophies that they created remains strong.

Material Type: Diagram/Illustration, Reading

8c. The Rise of Hinduism

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Not many things have endured without interruption or major transformation for over 5,000 years. Hindu traditions such as these are great exceptions. Arguably, Hinduism is the oldest religion on Earth.

Material Type: Diagram/Illustration, Reading

China: One of the World's Greatest Civilizations

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The authors of this unit define the characteristics of "civilization" and present Chinese culture and history in light of these characteristics. The original eight-week unit is available in the Primary Source library; four lessons are presented here: an introduction to the elements of civilization, Chinese dynasties, Chinese philosophy and the importance of silk to China's economic history.

Material Type: Lesson Plan, Teaching/Learning Strategy

Authors: Jessica Germain, Lara SanGiovanni, Sandra Lovett

Exploring the World of Ancient Civilizations

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High School Global History teacher Sarah Caufield, from the New York Harbor School, turns the learning of ancient civilizations over to her students as they conduct brief research to share with their peers. Students work in self-selected groups and determine the key information to include on the poster they create about a given ancient civilization. Topics include the function and purpose of the civilization, early writing systems, calendar systems, religion, and goods and trade. Students then participate in a gallery walk where they use a rubric to grade and provide feedback on their classmatesŐ work.Students work very naturally and effectively within teams and across teams and provide feedback openly.

Material Type: Lesson Plan, Teaching/Learning Strategy

Human-Environment Interactions in India

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In the media and in the classroom, much emphasis has been placed on India's stunning economic growth since the 1990s. Less attention has been paid, however, to the consequences of the country's rapid industrialization on the nation's people and natural environment. Like many other developing societies throughout history, India's economic progress has resulted in environmental degradation, natural resource depletion, and increased consumption and waste, thereby threatening people's health, access to resources, and traditional ways of life. Using case studies on pollution in the Ganges River, coal mining in Jharkhand, and data comparing the country's total and per capita energy consumption, this cluster explores, and places within a global context, the pressing environmental and human challenges brought by India's industrialization.

Material Type: Case Study, Lecture, Lesson Plan, Reading, Teaching/Learning Strategy

Authors: Lina Yamashita, Liz Howald, Michael H. Fisher

5. Ancient Greece

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Democracy. Philosophy. Sculpture. Dramatic tragedies. The Olympic Games. Many of the fundamental elements of Western culture first arose more than 2000 years ago in ancient Greece.

Material Type: Diagram/Illustration, Reading