All resources in Washington Social Studies

The State We're In: Washington - Teacher Guide Ch. 4: 1900-2000: A Century of Change

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This is a Teacher's Guide for The State We're In Washington: Your guide to state, tribal and local government. These quides are developed by members of the Washington State Social Studies Cadre. Chapter 4 focuses on the significant amount of change the state of Washington experienced from 1900 to 2000. The resources here may be implemented separately or together to guide students toward a deeper understanding of the content therein and to develop important social studies skills.

Material Type: Lesson, Lesson Plan, Teaching/Learning Strategy

Authors: Barbara Soots, Leslie Heffernan, Ryan Theodoriches, Callie Birklid, Jerry Price, Washington OSPI OER Project

Grade 8 Inquiry: Road to Revolution

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This inquiry by Amy Johnson, Longview Public Schools, is based on the C3 Framework inquiry arc. Students will look at multiple points of view on an assigned Intolerable Act. After researching primary sources, student will create a newspaper using BEST evidence from their sources that answers the question, "Why would this event the colonists to revolt?"

Material Type: Lesson, Lesson Plan, Teaching/Learning Strategy

Authors: Barbara Soots, Jerry Price, Washington OSPI OER Project

Remix

The State We're In: Washington (Chinese Translation)

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Seattle Public Schools OER Grant has produced Chinese translations of The State We're In for use in Middle School Mandarin Dual Language Immersion Programs. The State We’re In: Washington is an online and printed educational publication written by Jill Severn for the League of Women Voters of Washington Education Fund. Part of a larger Civic Education Project, this instructional resource establishes the link between public participation and effective government. Colorful graphs, historical photos and thought-provoking illustrations help to describe the basics of government, and the connection between a governing authority and culture and economy. Young readers and adults alike will gain a robust sense of past and present tribal governance and their relationship to state and local government in Washington. 

Material Type: Textbook

Author: Thad Williams

How great was the Great Migration?

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The goal of this inquiry is for students to gain an informed, critical perspective on the Great Migration of African Americans from the South to the North and West from 1915-1970.  By investigating the movement, including the injustice of Jim Crow in the South, and the racism migrants continued to face in the North and West, students will examine how the migration changed the social fabric of the United States.  Through taking a critical look at the documents, students should understand the extent to which this movement was “great,” and determine if the title Great Migration is fitting. 

Material Type: Lesson Plan

Author: Sue Metzler

Use of Atomic Weapons to End World War II

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This IDM inquiry leads students through an investigation of the decision by the United States to use atomic weapons on Japan at the end of World War II. The compelling question “Was the Dropping of Atomic Weapons on Japan an Appropriate Use of Force?” asks students to identify and weigh evidence from multiple primary and secondary sources supplied as well as others found by the student.

Material Type: Lesson, Unit of Study

Authors: Barbara Soots, Ryan Theodoriches, Washington OSPI OER Project

Civics: Bridging the Divide- Helping Students Engage in Discussions of Controversial Issues

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The Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction has teamed with the Civic Learning Council and the National Constitution Center to provide this professional development opportunity on resources and tools for helping students engage in discussions of controversial issues. Download the video file here: https://www.dropbox.com/s/jefvmk5tv6t0zoa/OSPI_CLC_CIVICS-BridgeTheDivide-FINAL.mp4?dl=0

Material Type: Teaching/Learning Strategy

Authors: Civic Learning Council, National Constitution Center, Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Elections and Voting Teacher Resources - Updated Version

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 It is important to educate future voters about the issues, processes, and impacts of voting in elections. These resources include links to lesson plans, videos, games, and printables to assist teachers K—12 to promote civic participation and voting.

Material Type: Lesson, Lesson Plan, Module, Teaching/Learning Strategy, Unit of Study

Authors: Barbara Soots, Washington OSPI OER Project, Kari Tally, Jerry Price

Engaging Students Regarding Events at U.S. Capitol

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At OSPI, part of our mission is to prepare students for civic engagement throughout their lives. We believe our schools must engage and empower students, from an early age, with opportunities to participate in civil conversations, examples of effective civic engagement, and tools to find peaceful solutions to community problems.OSPI’s Social Studies and Social-Emotional Learning teams have put together resources for educators, families, and students to help with these difficult conversations.

Material Type: Teaching/Learning Strategy

Authors: Kari Tally, Barbara Soots, Washington OSPI OER Project, Jerry Price

Teaching Elections in Washington State: Lesson Plans and Classroom Activities

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Educators need civics curriculum that informs and engages students. Teaching Elections in Washington State is written in partnership with the Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction and Washington teachers to do just that. For more resources visit: Civics Education | Washington Office of Secretary of State - https://www.sos.wa.gov/elections/civics/ Elections and Voting Teaching Resources Toolkit | Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Material Type: Lesson, Lesson Plan, Module, Unit of Study

Authors: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction, Washington Secretary of State

Checks and Balances in Action: Seeing the Big Picture

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In this activity students will analyze documents that span the course of American history to see examples of "checks and balances" between the legislative, executive, and judicial branches in action. Students will then match the documents they have examined with an appropriate description of the branches of government involved in the action.

Material Type: Activity/Lab

The Constitution and Congress

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The nation’s founders believed Congress to be the fundamental institution of the federal government, since it is the body that most closely represents the people. The framers of the United States Constitution began by creating Congress. Then they established the other two branches of government—the executive branch and the judicial branches.The Constitution gives each branch distinct powers, but it makes sure that the three are in competition. Each branch has its own ways to check and balance the powers of the other two. The separation and balance of powers has contributed to the government’s enduring vitality, providing order and stability while allowing flexibility for adaptation and change.

Material Type: Reading

Author: OER_LIBRARIAN

The Constitution in Action: Article I (Lab Team 1)

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In this activity students will analyze the Oaths of Senators for the Impeachment Trial of William Jefferson Clinton and identify how the document demonstrates content contained within Article I, sections 1-7 of the Constitution in action. This activity is designed to prepare students for the Constitution-in-Action Lab at the National Archives in Washington, DC. It is a part of a package of activities associated with the lab experience.

Material Type: Activity/Lab

From Freedom’s Shadow

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Freedom for some meant slavery for others. The cruel irony of this nation’s founding and its “Temple of Liberty”—the U.S. Capitol—is that both were made possible by the enslavement of African Americans. The labor of enslaved and free blacks helped build the Capitol. An enslaved African American man helped to cast the Statue of Freedom, which was placed atop the Dome during the Civil War. Since the end of the Civil War, African Americans have struggled to move out of the shadows and into the Temple of Liberty as full participants. This the online version of a traveling exhibit by the U.S. Capitol Historical Society that depicts the journey of African Americans from slavery to freedom and political representation in the U.S. Capitol. The exhibit opened February 2006 in Baltimore, Maryland at the Reginald F. Lewis Museum of Maryland African American History and Culture.

Material Type: Interactive

The Peaceful Transfer of Power

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The White House is a stage for the peaceful transfer of power from one administration to the next. Discover how the transfer from John Adams to Thomas Jefferson set this precedent. Featuring Dr. Matthew Costello, Senior Historian at the White House Historical Association.

Material Type: Lesson

The Origin of the President's Cabinet

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Learn about George Washington's creation of the cabinet, an advisory group for the President of the United States of America, and the cabinet's place in White House history. Featuring Dr. Lindsay Chervinsky, historian at the White House Historical Association and author of The Cabinet: George Washington and the Creation of an American Institution (available April 2020).

Material Type: Lesson

19th Amendment Centennial - Women's Suffrage

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The Washington State Women's Commission is commemorating the 100th anniversary of the 19th Amendment, which granted women the right to vote. These two videos are intended for educational purposes and to spark discussion about the importance of voting - "A Seat at the Table; Women's Sacred Right to Vote" and "The Untold Stories of Black Women in the Suffrage Movement"

Material Type: Primary Source

Authors: Barbara Soots, Jerry Price, Washington OSPI OER Project