#VTOpen

PLEASE READ ME FIRST!!: Important: When adding resources to this group, please use one of the following tags: vted or vtopen. This will allow VT educators to share both regionally and across the State with resources that are created by fellow Vermonters. Please use the content related folders to organize resources.
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All resources in #VTOpen

School Library Learning 2.0

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Welcome to School Library Learning 2.0. This tutorial is brought to you by the California School Library Association (CSLA) 2.0 Team. You will learn the tools of the new Internet: Web 2.0 tools that are bringing our kids in touch with the entire world through social networking, wikis, video, podcasting, and gaming sites. The exercises give you the background you need to understand the tools you're learning about.

Material Type: Activity/Lab

Author: Helene Blowers

Bio Cube

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Bio Cube is a useful summarizing tool that helps students identify and list key elements about a person for a biography or autobiography.

Material Type: Activity/Lab, Interactive

Into the Book

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The "Into the Book" web site is designed to help elementary students practice eight reading comprehension strategies through playful interactive activities. The site focuses on eight research-based strategies: Using Prior Knowledge, Making Connections, Questioning, Visualizing, Inferring, Summarizing, Evaluating and Synthesizing. "Behind the Lesson," the teacher area of the site, provides information, lesson plans and other resources for teachers.

Material Type: Assessment, Interactive, Lesson Plan, Teaching/Learning Strategy

Author: Wisconsin Media Lab

Ethics, Equity, and Critical Information Literacy in the School Library Published

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While school librarians typically are well exposed to issues surrounding censorship and selection, less attention is paid to the ethics of librarianship and how those play out in the specialized context of school libraries. Attention to the ALA Code of Ethics and the ALA Bill of Rights set the foundation for careful reflection on the role of the school librarian, particularly in relation to the role of libraries in a democratic society.Issues of equity are [inherent] in library service and attention to the dimensions of meaning and implications of the word “equity” is warranted. This module situates equity in the context of educational equity, and the alignment of libraries as gateways to opportunity and education as the pathway to opportunity. School librarians may or may not have opportunities to explore the contexts of “intellectual freedom” in relation to equity.The codification of information literacy in the American Library Association Presidential Committee on Information Literacy Final Report in 1989 paved the way for information literacy to “become the predominant way to frame the educational role of libraries and librarians.” (Seale, 2013, “The Neoliberal Library” in Gregory and Higgins) As such, inquiring into the complexities and nuances of intellectual freedom and equal access to information is essential to understanding the school librarian’s role and responsibilities.Library and school library publications are increasingly recognizing the relevance of social justice to librarianship, as evidenced by a survey of library journals this past year. (example: “Equality vs. Equity” theme, Knowledge Quest, Volume 45, No. 3, January/February, 2017; “Social Justice Symposium” by Erin Hooper in VOYA, June 2017) Recognizing the power of the librarians to not only hold space for critical discourse but to also impact the shape and tenor of that discourse is the first step to fully owning the responsibility that comes with that power.A particularly relevant and useful resource is Information Literacy and Social Justice: Radical Professional Praxis, edited by Lua Gregory and Shana Higgins, Library Juice Press, 2013Learning Objectives:Participants will model, coach, and support "efficient and ethical information-seeking behavior"  (Standard 3: Information & Knowledge 3.1)Participants will support flexible, open access for library services and model and communicate the legal and ethical codes of the profession. (Standard 3: Information & Knowledge 3.2)Participants practice the ethical principles of their profession, advocate for intellectual freedom and privacy, and promote and model digital citizenship and responsibility. (Standard 5: Program Management and Administration 5.2)Participants will understand, model, and share how open education practice brings a transformative shift from a proprietary and industrial education model to a participatory education model. (ISKME: Leadership and Advocacy - Advancing Open Practice) 

Material Type: Module

Author: Kim Carter

Leadership Essentials: School Librarians and OER - How will you lead your school? Making the Leap. Published

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The School Librarian Program at Granite State College is based on the foundational belief that school librarians are essential, integral and transformational leaders.  The program focuses on preparing school librarians as catalysts for school change and learning for the digital age.  In addition to developing the requisite skill sets and knowledge base needed to perform at top levels, there is a focus on the development of dispositions and attitudes such as initiative, creativity, self-direction, resilience, flexibility and intellectual curiosity which are crucial in assisting learning communities to engage in continuous improvement, innovation and reflective practice.  The program emphasizes the convergence of these dispositions,  skills, knowledge and understandings in order for candidates to achieve and succeed with a strategic plan for schools to ramp up and redesign school library media programs to provide the requisite, robust environment and intentional opportunities for meaningful student engagement with content, ideas, information and technology.This module is intended to be completed over the course of a 12-week semester and is designed to develop understanding about becoming a more effective school library leader within the evolving contexts of the digital age – especially related to the assessment of leadership dispositions and competencies needed to ramp up and redesign school library programs to provide the robust, flexible environments and intentional opportunities for meaningful student and teacher engagement with OER content, ideas, information and technology. The module addresses five areas of focus — preparation (2 weeks), planning (2 weeks), organizational strategy and change (3 weeks), transformational learning (3 weeks) and reflection/synthesis (2 week).

Material Type: Module

Author: Susan Ballard

How Many Teams?

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What we like about this task Mathematically: Addresses standards: 4.OA.A, 4.NBT.B, 4.OA.A.3, 4.NBT.B.6, MP.1, and MP.6 Requires students to understand the meaning of the quotient and remainder in order to solve problems in a real-world context Addresses content across two major clusters (4.OA.A and 4.NBT.B) within the grade, specifically 4.OA.A.3 and 4.NBT.B.6 Requires students to interpret what is being asked and perform extensive calculations (MP.1) accurately and efficiently (MP.6) In the classroom: Offers opportunities for students to use strategies based on place value, properties of operations, and/or the relationship between multiplication and division to solve division problems Provides repeated practice of multi-digit division and can be easily altered to allow for repeated use throughout the year Allows for small group, partner, or individual work

Material Type: Activity/Lab

Author: North Carolina Department Of Public Instruction

Find 1

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Mathematically: Addresses standards: 3.NF.A.2a and MP.1 Helps students understand fractions in relation to whole numbers 3.NF.A.2a Includes an example of a fraction greater than one, allowing students to see that fractions are not limited to values between $0$ and $1$ Requires students to make sense of the problem and persevere in solving it (MP.1) In the classroom: Engages students quickly without needing much scaffolding by the teacher Encourages students to share their developing thinking

Material Type: Activity/Lab

A+ Click K-12 Math Test

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A+ Click is an interactive collection of more than 3700 math problems and answers for K-1 K-12 school program. It defines the personal level of math knowledge. You move up into the next level if you give 5 correct answers in a row. Practice makes perfect.

Material Type: Activity/Lab, Assessment, Game, Lecture Notes

Author: Igor Kokcharov

‘Hunger Games’ Science: Investigating Genetically Engineered Organisms

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What lessons can we learn about genetically engineered organisms from the example of the jabberjay, a fictional bird in the movie “The Hunger Games”? In this lesson, students discuss the definition of genetically modified organisms, learn about the risks and benefits of research on G.M.O.’s, explore the growing do-it-yourself biology movement, and develop proposals seeking to either restrict or permit research into genetically modifying the avian flu virus.

Material Type: Activity/Lab, Assessment, Case Study, Homework/Assignment, Interactive, Lesson Plan, Reading, Simulation, Teaching/Learning Strategy, Unit of Study

Author: David Goodrich

ACESSE Resource A - Introduction to Formative Assessment to Support Equitable 3D Instruction Published

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In this professional development session, we will develop a shared understanding of how formative assessment works and different approaches that have been developed. The material for this resource come from a series of PD sessions on formative assessment developed by the ACESSE team: Philip Bell, Shelley Stromholt, Bill Penuel, Katie Van Horne, Tiffany Neill, and Sam Shaw.We will be updating this Facilitator's Guide for ACESSE Resource A with the most up-to-date information about this resource over time. If you encounter problems with this resource, you can contact us at: STEMteachingtools@uw.edu

Material Type: Module

Authors: Tiffany Neill, WILLIAM PENUEL, Sarah Evans, Katie Van Horne, Philip Bell, Shelley Stromholt, Sam Shaw