The University of Nottingham

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Windows on war : Soviet posters 1943-1945

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See the largest collection of Russian WWII propaganda posters outside the former Soviet Union in this video with Professor Cynthia Marsh April 2009 Suitable for Undergraduate study and community education Professor Cynthia Marsh, Professor of Russian Drama and Literature, Department of Russian and Slavonic Studies Professor Cynthia Marsh began the study of Russian after leaving school, by taking an intensive course to A-level at the then Holborn College of Law, Languages and Commerce, in Central London. She then went on to gain BA hons Russian (first class) at the University of Nottingham and spent a year at the School of Slavonic and East European Studies, University of London, completing an MA Area Studies: Russia, before going on to full time research there on the relationship between poetry and painting in the work of the Russian poet Max Voloshin. This research culminated in a PhD, entitled M.A.Voloshin: Artist-Poet: A investigation into the synaesthetic aspects of his poetry (awarded in 1979.) In 1972, after teaching Russian literature part-time on the University of London External BA honours course at Holborn, Professor Cynthia Marsh was appointed as a lecturer at Nottingham, and subsequently appointed senior lecturer and then Professor of Russian Drama and Literature. She served as head of department of Russian and Slavonic Studies from 2005-2006, and then from 2007- 2009. In 2002 she was awarded a Lord Dearing Award for Outstanding Teaching by the University and subsequently became a Member of the Higher Education Academy. She currently teaches modules on Russian theatre and Russian drama and her research interests continue to focus on Russian theatre, publishing mainly on Chekhov and Gorky.

Material Type: Lecture

Author: Professor Cynthia Marsh

Why study Thomas Aquinas?

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In this episode of the ‘Why Study’ series, Dr Simon Oliver discusses why he devotes so much attention to the medieval Dominican theologian, Thomas Aquinas (1225-74); and argues that when someone today comes to grips with his thought, that learning experience trains one to think theologically.

Material Type: Lecture

Author: Dr Simon Oliver

Why Study the Didache?

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In this episode of the ‘Why Study’ series, Professor Thomas O’Loughlin argues that a single, short, first-century Christian text, known as the Didache (‘the training’) can provide a valuable window into the lives of the earliest Christian communities and enhance our reading of their better known writings such as the gospels.

Material Type: Lecture

Author: Professor Thomas O’Loughlin

Why Study Rudolf Bultmann?

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Rudolf Bultmann (1884-1976) was a German Lutheran theologian whose work highlighted the difficulties of treating early Christian texts as simple historical narratives, while at the same time highlighting their importance as documents of faith. Henri Gagey, from the Institut Catholique in Paris, is an expert on Bultmann’s theology and presents an introduction to it here.

Material Type: Lecture

Author: Professor Henri Gagey

Why study Orthodox Christianity?

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Most English-speakers, when they think of Christianity, think only of its Latin, western forms, be they Catholic or Protestant. But this is only half the story: there are also all the churches of the East, often collectively referred to as ‘the Orthodox’. In this video, Mary Cunningham, an expert on Orthodoxy, introduces them.

Material Type: Lecture

Author: Dr Mary Cunningham

Why Study Karl Rahner?

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The work of the German theologian Karl Rahner (1904-84) has had a profound influence in the later decades of the twentieth century. In this episode of the ‘Why Study’ series, Dr. Karen Kilby, one of the world’s foremost authorities on the work of Karl Rahner, identifies key elements of his thought and suggests that these are still valuable insights for Christian thinkers.

Material Type: Lecture

Authors: Dr Karen Kilby, Professor Thomas O'Loughlin

Why study icons?

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Icons – religious images from the eastern Churches – are far more than religious images as seen in western churches: they enable an encounter between the observer and the mystery. In this video, Mary Cunningham, an expert on Orthodoxy, introduces them.

Material Type: Lecture

Author: Dr Mary Cunningham

Why Study Ibn Taymiyya?

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Ibn Taymiyya (1263-1328 C.E.) was an Islamic thinker who has exerted, and continues to exert, an enormous influence within Islamic thought. Taymiyya was often quoted by the late Osama Bin Laden and in this video, Jon Hoover, who has made a study of him and his importance in Islam, introduces Taymiyya and his thoughts.

Material Type: Lecture

Author: Dr Jon Hoover

War on climate change

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In this podcast - Going to war for the environment? Dr Matthew Humphrey, Reader in Political Philosophy assesses a controversial theory by Australian academic Professor Robyn Eckersley. Professor Eckersley is among a group of experts who believe that military intervention may be reasonably used to protect natural resources.

Material Type: Lecture

Author: Dr Matthew Humphrey

Using composite materials to replace bone

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In this podcast, Professor Chris Rudd, Dean of the faculty of Engineering at the University of Nottingham, describes his work with composite materials in the car industry and how it can be applied to the field of medicine. Traditionally, patients who have lost bone in an accident or have had bone removed due to cancer have had to endure two very long and very painful operations. One operation to attach steel plates to the bone, and a second operation once the bone has healed, to remove them. For the past ten years, Professor Rudd and his team have been researching degradable polymers that would be as strong as the steel plates, but could be absorbed by the body, thus eliminating the need for secondary surgery.

Material Type: Lecture

Author: Professor Chris Rudd

User-generated content : archeologies, economies and ecologies

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In this presentation from the Institute of Film and Television Studies' Ephemeral Media workshops, Professor Jon Dovey (UWE) presents his research into user-generated content. PLEASE NOTE: The presentation begins with a five minute video clip - keynote begins thereafter. Presentation produced/delivered: June/July 2009 Suitable for: Undergraduate study and community education Author and Presenter: Professor Jon Dovey, University of the West of England Jon has recently been appointed to the new Faculty of Creative Arts at University of the West of England with a view to raising the profile of media research there. The vehicle for this will be the Digital Cultures Research Centre, interfacing industry and academia, based at the Pervasive Media Studio. Jon is a leading researcher in the field of interactive media and gaming and spent the first 15 years of his working life in video production, working through the early years of Channel Four as a researcher, editor and eventually as Producer. He worked principally in documentary and experimental video, co founding original scratch artists Gorilla Tapes in 1984. His video projects gained international distribution and recognition and have now taken their place in the documented histories of UK Video Art. After moving to Bristol in 1990 he worked at the Watershed Media Centre for two years before teaching at the University of Plymouth in 1992 and then at both the University of the West of England School of Cultural Studies and the University of Bristol. As Head of the Department of Drama at Bristol University he piloted a £13m redevelopment through University planning stages.

Material Type: Lecture

Author: Professor Jon Dovey

Transitions : figures in space

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In this video Dr Edward Sellman talks about his portrait of the late Alan Sillitoe. As well as being an expert in special needs in Education, Dr Edward Sellman is also a recognised artist and in this video he takes you round his latest exhibition and reveals all about meeting and painting the famous author. 2009 Suitable for Undergraduate Study and Community Education Dr Edward Sellman, Lecturer, School of Education Dr Edward Sellman is a member of the Centre for Research in Schools and Communities. After training as an art/primary-school teacher he worked with children experiencing emotional and behavioural difficulties in a range of settings. He is the course leader of the Masters in Special Needs programmes (Nottingham and Malaysia campuses) and acts as a supervisor for research students working for MPhil/PhD degrees. He has conducted research about arts partnerships, children's experiences of exclusion from school, pupil voice and peer mediation projects in schools. He is author of the recently published book, 'Mediation Matters: Creating Peaceful Schools through Peer Mediation', published by LDA and the forthcoming book 'Creative Learning to Meet Special Needs', to be published by Routledge/Taylor & Francis. He is also a member of the International Journal of Pastoral Care in Education editorial board and a Fellow of the Institute of Mental Health Edward is also a practising artist/photographer (see www.megaumbrella.co.uk)

Material Type: Lecture

Author: Dr E M Sellman

The recurrent, the recombinatory and the ephemeral : thoughts on a textual system in transition

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In this presentation from the Institute of Film and Television Studies' Ephemeral Media Workshops, Professor William Uricchio discusses his research: The recurrent, recombinatory and the ephemeral: thoughts on a textual system in transition. Presentation produced/delivered: June/July 2009 Suitable for: Undergraduate Study and Community Education Professor William Uricchio, MIT/Utrecht William Uricchio is Professor and Director of the MIT Comparative Media Studies Program and professor of Comparative Media History at Utrecht University in the Netherlands. He has held visiting professorships at Stockholm University, the University of Science and Technology of China, the Freie Universität Berlin, and Philips Universität Marburg; and Guggenheim, Fulbright and Humboldt fellowships have supported his research. Professor William Uricchio considers the interplay of media technologies into cultural practices, and their role in (re-)constructing representation, knowledge and publics. In part, he researches and develops new histories of 'old' media (early photography, telephony, film, broadcasting, and new media) when they were new. And in part, he investigates the interactions of media cultures and their audiences through research into such areas as peer-to-peer communities and cultural citizenship, media and cultural identity, and historical representation in computer games and re-enactments. His most recent books include Media Cultures (2006 Heidelberg), on responses to media in post 9/11 Germany and the US, and We Europeans? Media, Representations, Identities (2008 Chicago). He is currently completing a manuscript on the concept of the televisual from the 17th century to the present

Material Type: Lecture

Author: Professor William Uricchio

The Labour leadership contest

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In this podcast, Professor Philip Cowley, from the School of Politics and International Relations, discusses the announcement of former Prime Minister Tony Blair’s decision to stand down as leader of the Labour Party and British Prime Minister on 27th June 2007. Professor Cowley discusses the reasons behind Tony Blair’s announcement and the pressure he has faced from within his own party. Professor Cowley goes on to discuss why Gordon Brown succeeded Tony Blair uncontested and the potential problems this could present for the new Prime Minister. Finally, Professor Cowley discusses the contest for the deputy leadership, why the candidates are standing and the challenges they will face in winning.

Material Type: Lecture

Author: Professor Philip Cowley

The end of the road?

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Road traffic has grown more than 80% since 1980 – as a result roads have deteriorated more quickly than could have been envisaged. Britain’s road network is one of the countries largest national assets. Professor Andy Collop from the Department of Civil Engineering describes the research taking place in Nottingham Transportation Engineering Centre and the improvements such knowledge can make to road materials, structures and sustainability.

Material Type: Lecture

Author: Professor Andy Collop

The anatomy cook book : a dissection guide with recipes

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The Anatomy Cookbook has been written to accompany an anatomy and physiology course for bioengineers who would otherwise have missed out on the opportunity to study real organ systems at first hand. It is not an alternative to a standard anatomy text, it acts more as a laboratory supplement. The fun bit is that your kitchen takes the place of the dissection room. Each recipe provides an insight into one or more organs, and all you need to do is go to the supermarket and be prepared to think about your food in a radically different way. In this videocast Donal McNally talks about the reasons that led to and rationale behind the release of his anatomy cook book on the internet. Presentation delivered June 2009 Suitable for Undergraduate Study Dr Donal McNally, Associate Professor and Reader in Bioengineering, Department of Mechanical, Materials and Manufacturing Engineering.

Material Type: Lecture

Author: Dr D S McNally

Shrinking the economy

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In this podcast Dr Robert Hoffmann talks about how important psychology is to business and asks if we have talked ourselves into recession. Dr Hoffmann is a member of the International Centre for Behavioural Business Research (ICBBR) within the Nottingham University Business School(NUBS). The centre has also recently opened a new extension at The University of Nottingham, Ningbo China. The centre's research brings together a range of experts who share an interest in studying decision-making in economic and business contexts, in particular using theories and methods from management, economics and psychology.

Material Type: Lecture

Author: Dr Robert Hoffmann