South Eastern School District

Our initial purpose is to develop a high school level ELA course.
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All resources in South Eastern School District

A Raisin in the Sun: The Quest for the American Dream

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A Raisin in the Sun by Lorraine Hansberry is the focal point for discussion of "The American Dream" as students explore how the social, educational, economical and political climate of the 1950s affected African Americans' quest for the good life in the suburbs. Read the play A Raisin in the Sun by Lorraine Hansberry with your students and you can enhance your discussion of "The American Dream" even while you and your students explore how the social, educational, economical and political climate of the 1950s affected African Americans' quest for "The American Dream."

Material Type: Activity/Lab, Assessment, Lesson Plan, Unit of Study

The Role of Gay Men and Lesbians in the Civil Rights Movement

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This series of lessons introduces students to four lesbian, gay, bisexual or transgender (LGBT) people of African descent and their allies. All fourŃJames Baldwin, Lorraine Hansberry, Pauli Murray, Bayard RustinŃwere indispensable to the ideas, strategies and activities that made the civil rights movement a successful political and social revolution.

Material Type: Lesson Plan, Reading, Unit of Study

Lunch Poems: Giovanni Singleton

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This reading celebrates the publication of "ascension," the first book of Poems by giovanni singleton, coordinator of Lunch Poems. She has recently been selected by the Poetry Society of America for its biennial New American Poets series. singleton is a recipient of a New Langton Bay Area Award Show for Literature and has been a fellow at Squaw Valley Community of Writers, Cave Canem: A Workshop for African-American Poets, and the Napa Valley WritersŐ Conference. She is founding editor of "nocturnes (re)view," a critically acclaimed journal dedicated to artists and writers of the African Diaspora and other contested spaces. (29 minutes)

Material Type: Lecture

A Lesson Before Dying by Ernest J. Gaines - Reader's Guide

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A frustrated schoolteacher in 1940s Louisiana tries to give a condemned man back his dignity before he dies. Vivid and compassionate, this novel asks: Knowing we're going to die, how should we live? The Big Read Readerĺĺs Guide deepens your exploration with interviews, booklists, timelines, and historical information. We hope this guide and syllabus allow you to have fun with your students while introducing them to the work of a great American author.

Material Type: Reading

Their Eyes Were Watching God by Zora Neale Hurston - Reader's Guide

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Zora Neale Hurston's vibrant novel presents Janie Mae Crawford's growth from a voiceless teenage girl into a woman who takes charge of her own destiny. The Big Read Readerĺĺs Guide deepens your exploration with interviews, booklists, time lines, and historical information. We hope this guide and syllabus allow you to have fun with your students while introducing them to the work of a great American author.

Material Type: Reading

The Fire Next Time by James Baldwin

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This collection uses primary sources to explore The Fire Next Time by James Baldwin. Digital Public Library of America Primary Source Sets are designed to help students develop their critical thinking skills and draw diverse material from libraries, archives, and museums across the United States. Each set includes an overview, ten to fifteen primary sources, links to related resources, and a teaching guide. These sets were created and reviewed by the teachers on the DPLA's Education Advisory Committee.

Material Type: Primary Source

Author: Samantha Gibson

Common Core Curriculum Grade 10 ELA: Making Evidence-Based Claims

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Making Evidence-Based Claims ELA/Literacy Units empower students with a critical reading and writing skill at the heart of the Common Core: making evidence-based claims about complex texts. These units are part of the Developing Core Proficiencies Program. This unit develops students' abilities to make evidence-based claims through activities based on a close reading of the Nobel Peace Prize Speeches of Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. and President Barack Obama.

Material Type: Primary Source, Reading, Teaching/Learning Strategy, Unit of Study

Arab Women Writers

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This blog is an initiative to celebrate and recognize Arab women writers, promote awareness of the breadth of their contributions to Arab and world culture, and create a focal point for information related to Arab women writers and their work. Information on books, generations of authors, a suggested reading list, references, upcoming events, and more is all available via the website. Books discussed have all been translated into English.

Material Type: Reading

Postcolonial Women Writers

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Professor Elleke Boehmer notes the distinct lack of women writers on the Post/Colonial Writing page of the Great Writers website, and explores why this is the case. She draws attention to the phenomenon of double colonization and, taking Scottish/South African author Zoe Wicomb as an example, looks at the marketing and publishing industries to discuss why postcolonial women writers are less well-known than their male counterparts. This audio recording is part the Interviews on Great Writers series presented by Oxford University Podcasts.

Material Type: Lecture

Author: Elleke Boehmer, Dominic Davies

The Joy Luck Club by Amy Tan - Teacher's Guide

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In sixteen interwoven stories, Amy Tan's characters--four Chinese immigrant mothers and their American-raised daughters--struggle to connect despite the ghosts and secrets of the past. This Big Read Teachers Guide contains ten lessons to lead you through Amy Tans classic novel, The Joy Luck Club. Each lesson has four sections: a thematic focus, discussion activities, writing exercises, and homework assignments. In addition, we have provided capstone projects and suggested essay topics, as well as handouts with more background information about the novel, the historical period, and the author. All lessons dovetail with the state language arts standards required in the fiction genre.

Material Type: Activity/Lab, Lesson Plan, Unit of Study

Resilience of the Human Spirit: Luong Ung's Story of Survival, First They Killed My Father and Cambodian History

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All of the primary and secondary sources used in this unit of study are part of the body of survival literature created by the Cambodian diaspora. The pieces reflect both the endurance of Khmer individuals and Khmer culture under a long period of conflict. In Peter Kiang's work, he found that refugee stories of resilience were a focal point for "motivating forces for persistence" (234, Kiang) for Southeast Asian students facing the challenge of university studies. However, many of the adolescent Cambodian American students in Lowell's classrooms today do not know this story. Understandably, many of their parents or elders are not able to or choose not to share with their children the traumatic stories that caused their forced departure from Cambodia.

Material Type: Lesson Plan, Teaching/Learning Strategy

Authors: Deborah Romeo, Mark Souza

Bread and Roses Strike of 1912: Two Months in Lawrence, Massachusetts, that Changed Labor History

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The Lawrence Textile Strike was a public protest mainly of immigrant workers from several countries, including Austria, Belgium, Cuba, Canada, France, England, Germany, Greece, Ireland, Italy, Lithuania, Netherlands, Norway, Poland, Portugal, Russia, Scotland, Spain, Syria, and Turkey. According to the 1910 census, 65% of mill workers (many of whom eventually struck) lived in the United States for less than 10 years; 47% for less than five years. Prompted by a wage cut, the walkout spread quickly from mill to mill across the city. Strikers defied the assumptions of conservative trade unions within the American Federation of Labor that immigrant, largely female and ethnically diverse workers could not be organized. The Lawrence strike is referred to as the “Bread and Roses” strike and “The Strike for Three Loaves." The first known source to do so was a 1916 labor anthology, The Cry for Justice: An Anthology of the Literature of Social Protest by Upton Sinclair. Prior to that, the slogan, used as the title of a 1911 poem by James Oppenheim, had been attributed to ‘Chicago Women Trade Unionists.’ It has also been attributed to socialist union organizer Rose Schneiderman. James Oppenheim claimed his seeing women strikers in Lawrence carrying a banner proclaiming “We Want Bread and Roses Too” inspired the poem, “Bread and Roses.” The poem, however, was written and published in 1911 prior to the strike. Later the poem was set to music by Caroline Kohlsaat and then by Mimi Farina. The song and slogan are now important parts of the labor movement and women’s movement worldwide. This exhibition was made in collaboration with the Lawrence History Center and the University of Massachusetts Lowell History Department.

Material Type: Diagram/Illustration, Primary Source, Unit of Study

Introduction to Asian American Studies: Literature, Culture, and Historical Experience, Fall 2013

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This course provides an overview of Asian American history and its relevance for contemporary issues. It covers the first wave of Asian immigration in the 19th century, the rise of anti-Asian movements, the experiences of Asian Americans during WWII, the emergence of the Asian American movement in the 1960s, and the new wave of post–1965 Asian immigration. The class examines the role these experiences played in the formation of Asian American ethnicity. The course addresses key societal issues such as racial stereotyping, media racism, affirmative action, the glass ceiling, the "model minority" syndrome, and anti-Asian harassment or violence. The course is taught in English.

Material Type: Full Course

Authors: Anonymous, Teng, Emma

Lunch Poems: Lisa Chen

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Born in Taipei, Taiwan, Lisa Chen earned a BA from UC Berkeley and an MFA from the University of Iowa. Her debut collection of poetry, mouth, received a 2009 award from the Association for Asian American Studies. Sesshu Foster says that ChenŐs work Ňstartles with soulful complexity.Ó (28 minutes)

Material Type: Lecture

Arab Culture Through Literature and Film: Daily Life, Kinship, Marriage and Family

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Across the Arab world, kinship and familial association are cornerstones of society and the experience of every individual. Though each kin group functions in a unique way, there is a pervasive pattern of reliance on family networks regardless of religion, gender, ethnicity, or class. This unit explores concepts and structures of family in Arab societies from a variety of angles. Students will explore Jordanian customs and consider the values behind them and their relation to family. They will also hear from gay and lesbian Middle Easterners who reflect on their concepts of family and its impact on their coming-out processes. Students will read select short stories and poems and watch Ajami, a film in which the plot is fueled by character reactions to their families' needs. In the final lesson of this unit, students will synthesize all of the lessons above to create an Arab kinship themed version of Chutes and Ladders that demonstrates the role of kinship in setting and realizing individual goals.

Material Type: Activity/Lab, Lesson Plan, Reading, Unit of Study