Schoolcraft College

Schoolcraft College is one of the 28 Michigan Community Colleges participating in the Michigan Colleges Online https://www.oercommons.org/hubs/mco OER initiative. This group is a space to evaluate, organize, and share OER with our faculty and students.
4 members | 57 affiliated resources

All resources in Schoolcraft College

Information Systems for Business and Beyond

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Welcome to Information Systems for Business and Beyond. In this book, you will be introduced to the concept of information systems, their use in business, and the larger impact they are having on our world. This book is written as an introductory text, meant for those with little or no experience with computers or information systems. While sometimes the descriptions can get a little bit technical, every effort has been made to convey the information essential to understanding a topic while not getting bogged down in detailed terminology or esoteric discussions. Learning objectives can be found at the beginning of each chapter. Of course, all chapters are recommended for use in an introductory information systems course. However, for courses on a shorter calendar or courses using additional textbooks, a review of the learning objectives will help determine which chapters can be omitted. At the end of each chapter, there is a set of study questions and exercises (except for chapter 1, which only offers study questions). The study questions can be assigned to help focus students’ reading on the learning objectives. The exercises are meant to be a more in-depth, experiential way for students to learn chapter topics. It is recommended that you review any exercise before assigning it, adding any detail needed (such as length, due date) to complete the assignment.

Material Type: Textbook

Author: OER_LIBRARIAN

Computer Concepts Video Lectures

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These are the video lectures for my computer concepts course. The link above will provide anyone with FREE access to my course (use the promo code THANKYOU). Here is a description of the course: You are about to embark on an exciting journey learning about the information revolution and the incredible world of computers. This course is very practical and applicable. It focuses on teaching you skills you can use. These skills include not only specific hands-on skills, like "right-clicking" and taking "screenshots," but also skills such as keeping yourself safe online, not texting while you're driving, and what to look for when buying computers (just to mention a very small fraction of the skills this course will teach you). This is a university level course designed to introduce individuals to the world of computers, so it is rich in its depth and breadth of content. I have taught this course for over a decade and have refined it to be incredibly amazing and awesome. You are going to love this course and it will forever change your life. You will gain skills in this course which you will use for the rest of your life and which will make your life easier. Knowing how to use computers is essential in our day-and-age. This course will give you the skills you need to use computers well. Presented with high-quality video lectures, this course will visually show you how to easily do everything with computers. This is just some of what you will learn in this course: Learn the basic principles of hardware including circuits, coding schemes, binary, the five generations of computers, Moore's Law, IPOS, registers, cache, RAM, magnetic storage, optical storage, solid-state storage, ROM, BIOS, the motherboard, buses, and the CPU. Learn how to operate a computer including a vast array of hands-on skills – just to mention a few for example: managing files, backing –up files, right clicking, taking screenshots, determining your computer’s properties, upgrading your computer, changing settings on your computer. Learn how to use word processing software including the creation of a title page, document sections, headers and footers, styles, an automatically generated table of contents, the insertion of images, references, and the insertion of an automatically generated citation of works referenced. Learn how to use spreadsheet software including formulas, functions, relative references, absolute references, mixed references, and the creation of a graph or chart. Learn how to use video editing software including adding credits and transitions then publishing that video to a video hosting website such as YouTube. Learn how to use databases including table creation, the setting of a primary key, the establishment of table relationships, the setting of referential integrity, and the creation and execution of a query. Learn how to use presentation software to more effectively give presentations. Learn to do some simple programing including designing, coding, testing, debugging, and running a program. Learn about the world wide web including sending email, conducting searches , having familiarity with online educational resources such as Khan Academy, and having an awareness of online "cloud computing" tools such as Google Word Processing, Google Spreadsheets, and the many other online tools offered by Google. Learn about application software and system software including operating systems, utilities, and drivers. Learn about networks including architecture, topology, firewalls, security, wireless networks, and securing wireless networks. Learn about the Internet, the World Wide Web, censorship, the digital divide, net neutrality, differing legal jurisdictions, website creation, multimedia, social media, and eCommerce. Learn about information systems, systems development, and the systems development life cycle. Learn about program development, programming languages, and the program development life cycle. Learn about databases including table creation, primary keys, relationships, referential integrity, queries, and structured query language. Learn about privacy and security issues related to computers. Learn about robots and artificial intelligence including the Turing test. Learn about intellectual property including patents, trademarks, copyrights, and the creative commons. Learn about ethics and ethical issues relating to the use of technology. Learn about health ramifications of using computers including repetitive stress injury, carpal tunnel syndrome, and ergonomics. Learn about e-Waste and other environmental concerns related to technology. Lifetime access to this course allows you to easily review material and continue learning new material. After taking this course, you will have a thorough understanding of how to use computers well. From beginners, to advanced users, this course is perfect for all ability levels. This course will add value to everyone's skillset.

Material Type: Lecture

Author: Todd McLeod

John Wood Community College: SLF 110 Computer Applications for the Small Business - SkillsCommons Repository

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This course prepares students who are unfamiliar with computer applications to use the Internet for research and communication. Microsoft Office® programs will be used to prepare business letters, newsletters and spreadsheets. Focus will be on formatting and content. Please note that all course materials and content are provided in the IMS Common Cartridge (IMSCC) format. The content can be accessed by opening the IMSCC file using your organization's Learning Management System application (these include Blackboard, D2L, Canvas etc.). Additional information about accessing Common Cartridge files can be found on the IMS Global Web site: http://www.imsglobal.org/cc. Future plans for the Skills Commons Web site include a feature that will allow users to view and download course content that is provided in the IMSCC format. Please refer to the "Enabling Others to Reuse Your Materials” page for more information: http://support.taaccct.org/enabling-reuse/. Each IGEN Consortium college has established an Industry Advisory Group as part ...

Material Type: Full Course

Author: Meegan Willi

Information Literacy Training for Students in the Faculty of Natural & Mathematical Sciences Published

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These exercises are originally part of the KLaSS module developed by King's College London Library Services to provide information literacy e-learning to students across our faculties. They were built and developed with Adobe Captivate 9 and published in HTML5 format, suitable for use with Moodle.This set of exercises is designed to provide information literacy support to students in the Faculty of Natural & Mathematical Sciences, which encompasses subjects like Informatics, Computer Science, Mathematics and Geography. The database used to demonstrate the principles is Web of Science, a broad resource holding literature on a wide variety of STEM subjects.The lessons cover the following topics:Planning an effective literature search - how to focus a research question and identify its key topics and componentsFinding literature - how to use different search techniques like truncation in Web of ScienceFinding full text articles in Web of Science - how to use the SFX system to look up the full texts of search results, and what to do if you don't immediately get accessWeb of Science Search Tips - using slightly more advanced techniques to run better searches, like using phrase searchingCombining searches in Web of Science - how to use AND & OR to broaden and refine seaches in Web of Science to retrieve relevant articles and informationFiltering search results in Web of Science - how to use Web of Science's filtering options to futhere refine results and exclude irrelevant articlesEach topic has a demonstration video, narrated by the author Tom Edge.The exercises have been published in HTML5 format so they should be compatible with any modern LMS. The authors have only used these files in Moodle 3.0, so cannot offer support for another LMS.

Material Type: Module

Authors: John Woodcock, Thomas Edge

The "Living" Room A Case Study in Artificial Intelligence, Collaborative Systems, and Language Understanding

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This case study analyzes the reasoning processes and types of information that we need to embed in collaborative software systems in order for these systems to demonstrate intelligent behavior and allow us to interact with them in a natural way. The central character of the case, Kate, is a college student who lives in an "intelligent" dorm room that converses with her as a friend would. Developed to introduce the ideas of collaboration and natural language understanding in an upper-division course in artificial intelligence, the case can be adapted for non-technical audiences for use in developing critical thinking skills.

Material Type: Case Study

Author: Admin

To Test or Not to Test: A Case Study on Ethics in Computing

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In 1991, faulty computer instructions caused a massive shutdown of phone systems in several major cities in the U.S., including Washington DC, Pittsburgh, Los Angeles, and San Francisco. The instructions were part of a revised version of software that was not tested fully because the changes were considered too small. Developed as part of the ethics module for a computer science course for non-majors, this case emphasizes good software development techniques, including full compliance with the rules.

Material Type: Case Study

Author: Admin

Introduction to EECS II: Digital Communication Systems, Fall 2012

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An introduction to several fundamental ideas in electrical engineering and computer science, using digital communication systems as the vehicle. The three parts of the course - bits, signals, and packets - cover three corresponding layers of abstraction that form the basis of communication systems like the Internet. The course teaches ideas that are useful in other parts of EECS: abstraction, probabilistic analysis, superposition, time and frequency-domain representations, system design principles and trade-offs, and centralized and distributed algorithms. The course emphasizes connections between theoretical concepts and practice using programming tasks and some experiments with real-world communication channels.

Material Type: Full Course

Author: Renata Ewing

Numerical Computation for Mechanical Engineers, Fall 2012

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This class introduces elementary programming concepts including variable types, data structures, and flow control. After an introduction to linear algebra and probability, it covers numerical methods relevant to mechanical engineering, including approximation (interpolation, least squares and statistical regression), integration, solution of linear and nonlinear equations, ordinary differential equations, and deterministic and probabilistic approaches. Examples are drawn from mechanical engineering disciplines, in particular from robotics, dynamics, and structural analysis. Assignments require MATLAB programming.

Material Type: Full Course

Author: Renata Ewing

Introduction to Communication, Control, and Signal Processing, Spring 2010

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This course examines signals, systems and inference as unifying themes in communication, control and signal processing. Topics include input-output and state-space models of linear systems driven by deterministic and random signals; time- and transform-domain representations in discrete and continuous time; group delay; state feedback and observers; probabilistic models; stochastic processes, correlation functions, power spectra, spectral factorization; least-mean square error estimation; Wiener filtering; hypothesis testing; detection; matched filters.

Material Type: Full Course

Author: Admin

Discovering Information Systems An Exploratory Approach

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Note: This book was written in 1999 and last updated in 2003. Since then technologies have changed so the non-conceptual and more technical parts of the book may be out of date.Why Yet Another Textbook (WYAT)?There are many excellent introductory information systems (IS) texts on the market. Why then produce our own text? Interestingly enough, when we sat down to critically review the first year Information Systems curriculum, the very last thing that we wanted was to get involved in writing yet another text. But after we had set the broad educational goals, the curriculum content and educational approach, we found that no textbook fitted our objectives or approach. Briefly, the following considerations forced us to fire up our word processor and compile the text you find in front of you.Technology Bias. A frequent criticism of the introductory information systems curricula is that many have a very strong technological bias: many courses are an in-depth treatment of hardware and software concepts with an avalanche of buzzwords, often reflecting some computer science origins. Although a sound understanding of the technology that underlies information systems is critical, this technology is subject to significant change and seems to receive a disproportionately large amount of attention. This is particularly prevalent in many of the American textbooks that we considered for this course: they all seem to be an "Introduction to Computers" rather than an "Introduction to Information Systems". We wondered where the broader scientific contexts are in these, admittedly very well illustrated but quickly out-dated, documentaries of computer technologies. This is in sharp contrast to a number of European and Australasian texts, some of which relegate all the technology concepts to a single chapter or even a mere appendix at the end of the book! We needed something of a balance between these two extremes. We hope that the three roughly equal sections (scientific, technological and organisational contexts) in this will provide a sufficiently balanced approach to the study of information systems. We wish to provide students with a sound technical understanding but also let them take into account the more philosophical, scientific and organisational aspects of information systems.Depth of Treatment. We needed a text where the conceptual or theoretical component would be equivalent to roughly half of a one-semester course. Most textbooks on the market are intended for full or half-year courses. A frequent comment, even of the newer "trimmed-down editions", is that there is just too much material. Students with little or no previous exposure to computer jargon especially despair when confronted with the many new terms and acronyms. In addition, many of these technologies may be outdated by the time the students have completed their studies. By limiting ourselves to twelve chapters and setting strict limits to the length of each chapter, we hope to stem the "information overload" without compromising the academic standard. We carefully considered "need to know" versus "nice to know". A good example of the latter are the typical detailed historical notes on historical devices such as the abacus, Babbage or ENIAC.Educational Approach. Contrary to our expectations, past student evaluations showed that the textbook previously use, a well-written American one with excellent colour photographs and illustrations, was not well received and lectures based on the textbook were judged to be "boring". It is clear that a different educational approach was needed, perhaps due to our unique South African circumstances. Based on our experiences, we hope that a participatory learning approach will make the "theoretical" section come more alive and replace the rote learning with genuine understanding. The integral part of this text is therefore in the supporting materials: readings, case studies, class assignments and group exercises.Cost. Although not a decisive factor, we also considered the fact that many students face financial constraints. By producing a local textbook, we hope to beat the exchange rate fluctuations.This text consist of twelve chapters, which can be grouped roughly into the following three sections.The scientific context: a review of the fundamental scientific concepts on which IS builds: what is information, what is a system and what are information systems.The technological context: an overview of relevant technology: hardware, software and communications technology.The organisational context: the development and deployment of information systems as well as some wider societal concerns.It is important that this text not be seen separate from the practical worksheets, case studies, videos and group work, which will be provided in the lectures. The intention of these additional materials is to enhance the educational process through participatory learning units: you learn best when doing.It is also our conviction that university students need to be introduced from the first year to academic pluralism: too often undergraduate students get the impression that there is a single correct approach or, even worse, that most problems have only one correct solution or answer. This text is therefor supplemented with additional readings, culled from the world-wide web, in which we hope to expose students to different views of the material presented in the concepts part.

Material Type: Case Study, Textbook

Author: Michael Paskevicius

Computer Concepts Video Lectures

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These are the video lectures for my computer concepts course. The link above will provide anyone with FREE access to my course (use the promo code THANKYOU). Here is a description of the course: You are about to embark on an exciting journey learning about the information revolution and the incredible world of computers. This course is very practical and applicable. It focuses on teaching you skills you can use. These skills include not only specific hands-on skills, like "right-clicking" and taking "screenshots," but also skills such as keeping yourself safe online, not texting while you're driving, and what to look for when buying computers (just to mention a very small fraction of the skills this course will teach you). This is a university level course designed to introduce individuals to the world of computers, so it is rich in its depth and breadth of content. I have taught this course for over a decade and have refined it to be incredibly amazing and awesome. You are going to love this course and it will forever change your life. You will gain skills in this course which you will use for the rest of your life and which will make your life easier. Knowing how to use computers is essential in our day-and-age. This course will give you the skills you need to use computers well. Presented with high-quality video lectures, this course will visually show you how to easily do everything with computers. This is just some of what you will learn in this course: Learn the basic principles of hardware including circuits, coding schemes, binary, the five generations of computers, Moore's Law, IPOS, registers, cache, RAM, magnetic storage, optical storage, solid-state storage, ROM, BIOS, the motherboard, buses, and the CPU. Learn how to operate a computer including a vast array of hands-on skills – just to mention a few for example: managing files, backing –up files, right clicking, taking screenshots, determining your computer’s properties, upgrading your computer, changing settings on your computer. Learn how to use word processing software including the creation of a title page, document sections, headers and footers, styles, an automatically generated table of contents, the insertion of images, references, and the insertion of an automatically generated citation of works referenced. Learn how to use spreadsheet software including formulas, functions, relative references, absolute references, mixed references, and the creation of a graph or chart. Learn how to use video editing software including adding credits and transitions then publishing that video to a video hosting website such as YouTube. Learn how to use databases including table creation, the setting of a primary key, the establishment of table relationships, the setting of referential integrity, and the creation and execution of a query. Learn how to use presentation software to more effectively give presentations. Learn to do some simple programing including designing, coding, testing, debugging, and running a program. Learn about the world wide web including sending email, conducting searches , having familiarity with online educational resources such as Khan Academy, and having an awareness of online "cloud computing" tools such as Google Word Processing, Google Spreadsheets, and the many other online tools offered by Google. Learn about application software and system software including operating systems, utilities, and drivers. Learn about networks including architecture, topology, firewalls, security, wireless networks, and securing wireless networks. Learn about the Internet, the World Wide Web, censorship, the digital divide, net neutrality, differing legal jurisdictions, website creation, multimedia, social media, and eCommerce. Learn about information systems, systems development, and the systems development life cycle. Learn about program development, programming languages, and the program development life cycle. Learn about databases including table creation, primary keys, relationships, referential integrity, queries, and structured query language. Learn about privacy and security issues related to computers. Learn about robots and artificial intelligence including the Turing test. Learn about intellectual property including patents, trademarks, copyrights, and the creative commons. Learn about ethics and ethical issues relating to the use of technology. Learn about health ramifications of using computers including repetitive stress injury, carpal tunnel syndrome, and ergonomics. Learn about e-Waste and other environmental concerns related to technology. Lifetime access to this course allows you to easily review material and continue learning new material. After taking this course, you will have a thorough understanding of how to use computers well. From beginners, to advanced users, this course is perfect for all ability levels. This course will add value to everyone's skillset.

Material Type: Lecture

Author: Todd McLeod

Information Literacy Training for Students in the Faculty of Natural & Mathematical Sciences Published

(View Complete Item Description)

These exercises are originally part of the KLaSS module developed by King's College London Library Services to provide information literacy e-learning to students across our faculties. They were built and developed with Adobe Captivate 9 and published in HTML5 format, suitable for use with Moodle.This set of exercises is designed to provide information literacy support to students in the Faculty of Natural & Mathematical Sciences, which encompasses subjects like Informatics, Computer Science, Mathematics and Geography. The database used to demonstrate the principles is Web of Science, a broad resource holding literature on a wide variety of STEM subjects.The lessons cover the following topics:Planning an effective literature search - how to focus a research question and identify its key topics and componentsFinding literature - how to use different search techniques like truncation in Web of ScienceFinding full text articles in Web of Science - how to use the SFX system to look up the full texts of search results, and what to do if you don't immediately get accessWeb of Science Search Tips - using slightly more advanced techniques to run better searches, like using phrase searchingCombining searches in Web of Science - how to use AND & OR to broaden and refine seaches in Web of Science to retrieve relevant articles and informationFiltering search results in Web of Science - how to use Web of Science's filtering options to futhere refine results and exclude irrelevant articlesEach topic has a demonstration video, narrated by the author Tom Edge.The exercises have been published in HTML5 format so they should be compatible with any modern LMS. The authors have only used these files in Moodle 3.0, so cannot offer support for another LMS.

Material Type: Module

Authors: John Woodcock, Thomas Edge

The "Living" Room A Case Study in Artificial Intelligence, Collaborative Systems, and Language Understanding

(View Complete Item Description)

This case study analyzes the reasoning processes and types of information that we need to embed in collaborative software systems in order for these systems to demonstrate intelligent behavior and allow us to interact with them in a natural way. The central character of the case, Kate, is a college student who lives in an "intelligent" dorm room that converses with her as a friend would. Developed to introduce the ideas of collaboration and natural language understanding in an upper-division course in artificial intelligence, the case can be adapted for non-technical audiences for use in developing critical thinking skills.

Material Type: Case Study

Author: Admin

To Test or Not to Test: A Case Study on Ethics in Computing

(View Complete Item Description)

In 1991, faulty computer instructions caused a massive shutdown of phone systems in several major cities in the U.S., including Washington DC, Pittsburgh, Los Angeles, and San Francisco. The instructions were part of a revised version of software that was not tested fully because the changes were considered too small. Developed as part of the ethics module for a computer science course for non-majors, this case emphasizes good software development techniques, including full compliance with the rules.

Material Type: Case Study

Author: Admin

Criminal Law

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Criminal Law uses a two-step process to augment learning, called the applied approach. First, after building a strong foundation from scratch, Criminal Law introduces you to crimes and defenses that have been broken down into separate components. It is so much easier to memorize and comprehend the subject matter when it is simplified this way. However, becoming proficient in the law takes more than just memorization. You must be trained to take the laws you have studied and apply them to various fact patterns. Most students are expected to do this automatically, but application must be seen, experienced, and practiced before it comes naturally. Thus the second step of the applied approach is reviewing examples of the application of law to facts after dissecting and analyzing each legal concept. Some of the examples come from cases, and some are purely fictional. All the examples are memorable, even quirky, so they will stick in your mind and be available when you need them the most (like during an exam). After a few chapters, you will notice that you no longer obsess over an explanation that doesn’t completely make sense the first time you read it—you will just skip to the example. The examples clarify the principles for you, lightening the workload significantly.

Material Type: Textbook

Author: Lisa Storm