Schoolcraft College

Schoolcraft College is one of the 28 Michigan Community Colleges participating in the Michigan Colleges Online https://www.oercommons.org/hubs/mco OER initiative. This group is a space to evaluate, organize, and share OER with our faculty and students.
4 members | 59 affiliated resources

All resources in Schoolcraft College

Introduction to EECS II: Digital Communication Systems, Fall 2012

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An introduction to several fundamental ideas in electrical engineering and computer science, using digital communication systems as the vehicle. The three parts of the course - bits, signals, and packets - cover three corresponding layers of abstraction that form the basis of communication systems like the Internet. The course teaches ideas that are useful in other parts of EECS: abstraction, probabilistic analysis, superposition, time and frequency-domain representations, system design principles and trade-offs, and centralized and distributed algorithms. The course emphasizes connections between theoretical concepts and practice using programming tasks and some experiments with real-world communication channels.

Material Type: Full Course

Authors: George Verghese, Hari Balakrishnan

Introduction to Communication, Control, and Signal Processing, Spring 2010

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This course examines signals, systems and inference as unifying themes in communication, control and signal processing. Topics include input-output and state-space models of linear systems driven by deterministic and random signals; time- and transform-domain representations in discrete and continuous time; group delay; state feedback and observers; probabilistic models; stochastic processes, correlation functions, power spectra, spectral factorization; least-mean square error estimation; Wiener filtering; hypothesis testing; detection; matched filters.

Material Type: Full Course

Authors: Oppenheim, Alan V., Verghese, George

Hurricane Central

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In this lesson, learners use a Web-based version of ImageJ to examine images of Hurricane Katrina as it moved through the Gulf of Mexico in August 2005. Students explore infrared radiation, water vapor, and visible radiation, and use images captured by the NOAA GOES satellite to plot and measure the path of Katrina.

Material Type: Activity/Lab, Data Set, Diagram/Illustration, Interactive, Lesson Plan, Simulation

Basic Computing Concepts, Including History

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This unit introduces basic computing concepts and terminology. It identifies common elements of computers, both in terms of hardware and software and provides information on selecting a computer by discussing the range of computer types, from desktops to laptops to servers. Finally, it provides a history of the development of computing and healthcare information systems over time.

Material Type: Lecture

Author: Oregon Health & Science University

Telling Stories: Witness to a Brawl

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Students explore how an artist emphasized the narrative in a work of art that depicts a single moment from the story. They then write a newspaper article, using visual clues in the painting to imagine how the narrative depicted may have unfolded.

Material Type: Diagram/Illustration, Lesson Plan

Race, Immigration, and Planning, Spring 2005

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This course provides an introduction to the issues of immigrants, planning, and race. It identifies the complexities and identities of immigrant populations emerging in the United States context and how different community groups negotiate that complexity. It explores the critical differences and commonalities between immigrant and non-immigrant communities, as well as how the planning profession does and should respond to those differences. Finally, the course explores the intersection of immigrant communities' formation and their interactions with African Americans and the idea of race in the United States.

Material Type: Full Course

Authors: J. Phillip, Thompson

Hearing Harmony: What is Harmony?

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Hearing Harmony takes an innovative top down approach: Its goal is not to recognize individual chords but to develop an understanding of harmonic structure. Hearing Harmony is compatible with standard courses in harmony and ear training: Very little of the material introduced here is idiosyncratic; it is how it is organized and presented that is new. After completing these modules, you will be well equipped for conventional training, either in school or from the many fine resources on the web. Hearing Harmony can also be used to build on prior training.

Material Type: Module

Family Planning Policies and Programs

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Introduces issues and programmatic strategies related to the development, organization, and management of family planning programs, especially those in developing countries. Topics include social, economic, health, and human rights rationale for family planning; identifying and measuring populations in need of family planning services; social, cultural, political, and ethical barriers; contraceptive methods and their programmatic requirements; strategic alternatives, including integrated and vertical programs and public and private sector services; information, education, and communication strategies; management information systems; and the use of computer models for program design.

Material Type: Full Course, Homework/Assignment, Lecture Notes, Syllabus

Authors: Henry, Mosley

LookLex

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Looklex Encyclopedia is a Norway based media whose intent is to introduce and present the diverse countries in North Africa and the Middle East along with their cultures to a predominantly western audience. This resource offers a variety of accredited articles in the fields of education, religion, modern countries, languages, economy, health, politics, ancient civilizations and much more. The encyclopedia also offers an atlas of several civilizations throughout different time periods in addition to travel guides.

Material Type: Reading

Culture Talk: Egypt

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CultureTalk - Arab World features native speakers from across the Arabic-speaking world giving filmed interviews, in Arabic and sometimes English, on selected topics. Text-based translations and transcriptions are often provided as downloadable documents for most Arabic videos. The videos engage a number of region/country-specific topics, including cultural traditions, religion, politics, and sports.

Material Type: Activity/Lab, Lecture, Reading

Islamic Art and Culture: A Resource for Teachers

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In this packet we look at works that span nearly a thousand yearsäóîfrom shortly after the foundation of Islam in the seventh century to the seventeenth century when the last two great Islamic empiresäóîthe Ottoman and the Safavidäóîhad reached their peak. Although the definition of Islamic art usually includes work made in Mughal India, it is beyond the scope of this packet. The works we will look at here come from as far west as Spain and as far east as Afghanistan.

Material Type: Reading, Teaching/Learning Strategy

Prealgebra

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Prealgebra is designed to meet scope and sequence requirements for a one-semester prealgebra course. The book’s organization makes it easy to adapt to a variety of course syllabi. The text introduces the fundamental concepts of algebra while addressing the needs of students with diverse backgrounds and learning styles. Each topic builds upon previously developed material to demonstrate the cohesiveness and structure of mathematics.

Material Type: Textbook

Author: MaryAnne Anthony-Smith

Math in Society

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Math in Society is a free, open textbook. This book is a survey of contemporary mathematical topics, most non-algebraic, appropriate for a college-level topics course for liberal arts majors. The text is designed so that most chapters are independent, allowing the instructor to choose a selection of topics to be covered. Emphasis is placed on the applicability of the mathematics. Core material for each topic is covered in the main text, with additional depth available through exploration exercises appropriate for in-class, group, or individual investigation. This book is appropriate for Math 107 (Washington State Community Colleges common course number).

Material Type: Textbook

Author: David Lippman

Understanding Basic Music Theory

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Although it is significantly expanded from "Introduction to Music Theory", this course still covers only the bare essentials of music theory. Music is a very large subject, and the advanced theory that students will want to pursue after mastering the basics will vary greatly. A trumpet player interested in jazz, a vocalist interested in early music, a pianist interested in classical composition, and a guitarist interested in world music, will all want to delve into very different facets of music theory; although, interestingly, if they all become very well-versed in their chosen fields, they will still end up very capable of understanding each other and cooperating in musical endeavors. The final section of this course does include a few challenges that are generally not considered "beginner level" musicianship, but are very useful in just about every field and genre of music.

Material Type: Full Course

Author: Catherine Schmidt-Jones

Science Update Podcasts

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Podcasts of the Science Update radio show are available by subscription, or they can be streamed or downloaded directly from the website. These daily sixty-second radio features, sponsored by the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS), cover the latest discoveries in science, technology and medicine. Subscription podcasts are delivered each Friday directly to subscribers' computers. Archived shows dating back to December 2005 are available.

Material Type: Lecture

American Political Thought

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This course will cover American political thought from the nation's founding through the 1960s, exploring the political theories that have shaped its governance. As there is no one philosopher or idea that represents the totality of American political thought, the student will survey the writings and speeches of those who have had the greatest impact over this period of time. Much of the study required in this course is based on the original texts and speeches of those who influenced political thought throughout American history. The student will learn and understand the impact that their views and actions have had on the modern American state. Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to: describe the religious and political origins of the American political system; explain how Enlightenment thinkers, such as John Locke, Thomas Hobbes, and Jean-Jacques Rousseau, and Baron de Montesquieu, influenced the political philosophies of American founding fathers; analyze how the colonial American experience shaped many of the core values represented in American government and expressed in the Declaration of Independence and the U.S. Constitution; compare and contrast the differing opinions on the role of the government that the founders expressed; trace the development and evolution of the concepts of 'states rights' and 'federal (national) supremacy'; connect the observations of De Tocqueville in Democracy in America to the concepts of equality, individuality, and civic engagement in American political discourse; examine the evolution of race in the American political system (from slavery to the 2008 election of Barack Obama); discuss the changes in the political role of women in America from its colonial days to the present; connect the concept of 'American Exceptionalism' to the industrial revolution, capitalism, and imperialism; analyze the roots of reform in the Progressive Era and their impact on modern political discourse; explain major principles of American foreign relations over time; assess the purpose and impact of ĺÎĺĺĺŤAmerican war rhetoricĄ_ĺĺö over time; differentiate between 'liberal' and 'conservative' political beliefs in modern American government; illustrate how the political turmoil in the 1960s greatly shaped contemporary American political discourse; evaluate the current political discourse as represented in the 2008 and 2010 elections. (Political Science 301)

Material Type: Assessment, Full Course, Lecture, Lecture Notes, Reading, Syllabus