All resources in Scholarly Communication Notebook

GitHub for Static Web Publishing

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This tutorial introduces GitHub as a free static website publishing platform. No installation of additional software is required, however, you will need a GitHub account. By the end of this tutorial, you will have your own version of an open textbook template available for further editing. This tutorial is estimated to take between 30 and 60 minutes to complete.

Material Type: Activity/Lab

Author: Chris Diaz

Introduction to Static Site Generators

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This tutorial will teach you the basics of using a static site generator. We will be using Hugo to build our demonstration site. We’ll play the role of a scholarly communications librarian. We’ll be using a command line terminal to install software and run commands and a text editor to edit and save plain text files. This in-depth tutorial is estimated to take between three and four hours to complete. While we will be using Hugo as our static site generator, this tutorial is not intended to be a cover the depth and breadth of Hugo. For that, I refer you to the Hugo documentation and community. Rather, this tutorial is about using static site generators in a library-publishing context.

Material Type: Activity/Lab

Author: Chris Diaz

Digital Humanities Pedagogy: Practices, Principles and Politics

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Academic institutions are starting to recognize the growing public interest in digital humanities research, and there is an increasing demand from students for formal training in its methods. Despite the pressure on practitioners to develop innovative courses, scholarship in this area has tended to focus on research methods, theories and results rather than critical pedagogy and the actual practice of teaching. The essays in this collection offer a timely intervention in digital humanities scholarship, bringing together established and emerging scholars from a variety of humanities disciplines across the world. The first section offers views on the practical realities of teaching digital humanities at undergraduate and graduate levels, presenting case studies and snapshots of the authors’ experiences alongside models for future courses and reflections on pedagogical successes and failures. The next section proposes strategies for teaching foundational digital humanities methods across a variety of scholarly disciplines, and the book concludes with wider debates about the place of digital humanities in the academy, from the field’s cultural assumptions and social obligations to its political visions. Digital Humanities Pedagogy broadens the ways in which both scholars and practitioners can think about this emerging discipline, ensuring its ongoing development, vitality and long-term sustainability.

Material Type: Textbook

Author: Brett D. Hirsch

Open Pedagogy with Faculty & Students

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Open Pedagogy is a collection of open practices in the classroom made possible by replacing commercial textbooks with open educational resources. These emerging practices enabled by open content licensing (and an open mindset) involve students in making decisions about their own learning experiences and contributing directly to global knowledge to impact not only other students but generate renewable value outside of the classroom. This is a recording of a webinar presented by three faculty members and two students who have participated in open pedagogy projects that were enabled through the adoption of open education resources and open practices. Learn how students working with instructional designers and librarians have begun to help faculty adopt, create and implement open content across their campus.

Material Type: Interactive

Access, Power, & Privilege: A Toolkit at the Intersections of Scholarly Communication and Information Literacy

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This faculty and librarian toolkit is designed to support teaching at the intersections of scholarly communication and information literacy. The heart of the toolkit is a choose-your-own scenario activity which can be used in a flipped classroom setting or in a traditional classroom. The choose-your-own scenario activity is inspired by and adapts questions from: Hare, S. & Evanson, C. (2018). Information privilege outreach for undergraduate students. College and Research Libraries. http://crl.acrl.org/index.php/crl/article/view/16767. Please note the survey questions are provided below, however, the survey skip logic is not included in the PDF, we recommend the link for the full experience. We also include talking points for librarians and instructors and include ways to modify the activity for students publishing information within their disciplines or for lower-division general education courses.

Material Type: Teaching/Learning Strategy

Author: Carolyn Caffrey Gardner

Adopting Open Educational Resources in the Classroom

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VCCS's "Pathways" Course provides faculty with an introduction to the laws that influence the use, re-use, and distribution of content they may want to use in a course. Activities include finding openly licensed content for use in a class and publishing openly licensed works created by faculty. At the end of the course, students will have openly licensed content that will be ready for use in a course.

Material Type: Full Course, Textbook

Author: Linda Williams

Peer Review Process Guide – The Rebus Guide to Publishing Open Textbooks (So Far)

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This section of The Rebus Guide to Publishing Open Textbooks (So Far) will help you coordinate and implement peer review on your book, including advice on deciding what type of review is needed, the tools to use, creating a guide for reviewers, and more. It is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License (CC BY) and you are welcome to print this document, make a copy for yourself, or share with others. Please read through the sections below, and consider the suggestions as you begin the peer review stage of your project. If you have any questions or feedback, please feel free to post them in the Rebus Community project home. This document is an evolving draft, based on our experience managing open textbook projects and community feedback. We welcome your thoughts and contributions, so let us know how it works for you, or if you have any suggestions to improve the guide.

Material Type: Reading

Authors: Apurva Ashok, Zoe Wake Hyde

SI 521 - Special Topics: Open Educational Resources and the University of Michigan

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This course is no longer taught at the U-M School of Information. These materials are from an older iteration of the course. This course introduces students to the ideas and practices surrounding teaching, learning and research at a world class research university like the University of Michigan, and the emerging role in these practices of Open Educational Resources, including open content such as opencourseware, open access initiatives, open publishing of research and learning materials as found in open journals, databases and e-prints, open textbooks, related open software efforts such as open learning systems, and emerging open teaching experiments. The course will ground the students in how teaching, learning and research is done at the university level, and then survey relevant OER efforts, looking at their history, development, potential futures, and the underlying motivations for their progressive adoption by various members of the community of scholars. more... This course uses an open textbook Open Educational Resources at the University of Michigan. The articles in the open textbook (wikibook) were written by the School of Information Graduate students in the class.

Material Type: Full Course

Authors: Ashleigh Donaldson, Beth Ziobro, Bobby Glushko, Bryan Birchmeier, Elaine Engstrom, Eric Hansen, Heather Alderfer, Jessica Thudium, Johmarx Patton, Joseph Hardin, Josh Ohlendorf, Katherine Marshall, Kathleen Ludewig, Kim Hoff, Lisa Bankey, Mark Fleszar, Mike Kargela, Samantha Bigger, Scott Berkley, Tom Hayden, Travis August

Differentiating Between Open Access and Open Educational Resources

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Differentiating open access and open educational resource can be a challenge in some contexts. Excellent resources such as "How Open Is It?: A Guide for Evaluating the Openness of Journals" (CC BY) https://sparcopen.org/our-work/howopenisit created by SPARC, PLOS, and OASPA greatly aid us in understanding the relative openness of journals. However, visual resources to conceptually differentiate open educational resources (OER) from resources disseminated using an open access approach do not currently exist. Until now. This one page introductory guide differentiates OER and OA materials on the basis of purpose (teaching vs. research), method of access (analog and digital), and in terms of the relative freedoms offered by different levels of Creative Commons licenses, the most common open license. Many other open licenses, including open software licenses also exist.

Material Type: Diagram/Illustration

Author: Walz Anita

Recommended Practices for Packaging and Distributing OER

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OER may be distributed in a variety of formats, including electronically online, removable media (e.g. CD/DVD, or USB), and/or paper hard copies. In order to maximize its reach and visibility, OER is often distributed online which introduces new considerations such as managing file size and selecting appropriate descriptive data (commonly referred to as metadata). File size is an especially important consideration as small manageable files can be more easily downloaded in bandwidth-constrained areas. As part of the African Health OER Network, completed OER are often hosted on multiple servers: an institutional server, the official Network web space with OER Africa, and on the University of Michigan (U-M) Open Michigan website.The aim of these guidelines is to encourage the creation of OER that is easily discoverable, accessible, and adaptable.

Material Type: Reading

OER Course

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This OER Course is designed to introduce faculty and staff on OER basics, copyright information, and other key topics relating to OER.Please complete the online OER course individually or with a partner.  Since this is an online course, you can work at your own pace.  You will be responsible for all material covered within the course.  The course will take around 1 hour to complete.

Material Type: Module

Author: Maria Larish

Ontario College Libraries’ OER Toolkit

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The OER Toolkit aims to improve equitable access to open learning resources and services to college students by providing a province-wide academic support platform for faculty to use while designing courses and assignments. The Toolkit is a one-stop guide to open educational resources, providing faculty and library staff with tools and information to understand, engage with, create, and sustain OER in their work and practice. The Toolkit is designed to be used by anyone involved with OER at an academic institution, whether you are part of a team that is collaborating to create OER, a library staff member who is supporting OER development and use, an advocate for OER at your institution, or an instructor seeking to incorporate OER and open pedagogy in the classroom. The primary purpose of this Toolkit is to support faculty and library staff at Ontario colleges; however, it is openly available for use beyond the Ontario college community.

Material Type: Module, Teaching/Learning Strategy

Author: Colleges Libraries Ontario and the Ontario Colleges Library Service in collaboration with ISKME

OER: A Field Guide for Academic Librarians

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We intend this book to act as a guide writ large for would-be champions of OER, that anyone called to action by the example set by our chapter authors might serve as guides themselves. The following chapters tap into the deep experience of practitioners who represent a meaningful cross section of higher education institutions in North America. It is our hope that the examples and discussions presented by our authors will facilitate connections among practitioners, foster the development of best practices for OER adoption and creation, and more importantly, lay a foundation for novel, educational excellence.

Material Type: Reading

Remix

OER Academy: Leadership & Advocacy

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This module in our training series provides participants with an exploration of OER leadership and advocacy. We have designed these modules to first spark the learner's interest in the topics covered and then dig deeper into the content through presentations, storytelling, and demonstrations of the tools. We will offer opportunities for learners to practice exploring the resources and tools, and reflect on how they might use them in their work.

Material Type: Module

Author: Megan Simmons

The Role of School Librarians in OER Curation: A Framework to Guide Practice

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This document is an evidence-based guide that outlines the practical and policy supports needed to enable K-12 school librarians to take on leadership roles around OER, and to support OER curation efforts by librarians and all educators. This guide is based on a study led by ISKME (iskme.org) in collaboration with Florida State University's School of Information. The study is titled “Exploring OER Curation and the Role of School Librarians". ISKME designs guides and toolkits that help educators navigate and implement new teaching and learning practices. Grounded in research, our evidence-based guides and toolkits help articulate what actually works in real education settings—and are tailored to the unique professional learning needs of our clients and their stakeholders. The study was made possible in part by the Institute of Museum and Library Services (www.imls.gov), under grant number LG-86-17-0035-17. The findings and recommendations expressed in this document do not necessarily represent those of the Institute of Museum and Library Services.

Material Type: Case Study, Teaching/Learning Strategy

Author: ISKME

OER Student Advocate Toolkit

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This toolkit was created by OER student leaders in the CCC and CSU systems. The toolkit's purpose is to motivate students to get involved in OER advocacy and the Open Education movement, as well as make it known that students can make a difference in their education. Education costs can be cut to a fraction of the price with OER, which would allow for more students to be able to access knowledge and higher education. While this toolkit contains some examples and suggestions specific to California institutions, it can still be helpful for all college students. Thanks to the Michelson 20MM Foundation's financial support students were paid for their work and contributions in creating this document, as well as presenting at conferences.

Material Type: Full Course, Primary Source, Reading, Student Guide

Authors: Barbara Illowsky, Edwin Hernandez Armenta, Kelsey Smith, Laura Cruz, Carlos Espinoza, Ashley Chavez, Timothy Maldonado, Natalie Miller, Trudi Radtke, Jenifer Vang, Ryan Erickson-Kulas

UH OER Publishing Guide

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In this book, we offer an introduction to OER publishing, examples of Open Pedagogy, OER-Enabled Pedagogy, and working with learners; and guidelines, best practices, and suggestions for how to plan, create, publish, and distribute your OER textbook and materials. This book is divided into four chapters: Teaching with OER, Open Pedagogy, and Working with Learners offers information about teaching with Open Educational Resources (OER), the ideas, practices, and principles behind Open Pedagogy, and working with students using OER and Open Pedagogy. We also provide resources to help orient students to OER, Open Pedagogy, and best practices for digital and online learning. Planning an OER Project provides guidelines on planning, workflow, and development of Open Educational Resource (OER) Textbooks; guidelines and suggestions on outlining, compiling, and writing your OER textbook and materials; a chapter prototype, and a quick guide to Pressbooks. Pre-Publication takes you through the steps necessary before you publish your OER textbook or materials. Sections include editing and formatting; assessment, evaluation, and rubrics; accessibility and usability, including localization, culturally appropriate materials, and student-centered pedagogy; and platform decisions. Post-Publication gives an overview of steps to take after you publish your OER textbook or materials. Topics include formatting output files, post-release considerations, user evaluation, including instructor and student evaluation, as well as peer-review; and updates, sustaining your OER textbook or materials, and considerations around new versions and new editions.

Material Type: Textbook

Authors: Lynleyshimat Renée Lys, William Meinke