All resources in Scholarly Communication Notebook

A Framework for Analyzing any U.S. Copyright Problem

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One of the most difficult issues for educators, when faced with a copyright problem, is simply knowing where to begin -- which parts of the legal rules and doctrines apply to the specific problem? To deal with this uncertainty, we suggest working through the following five questions, in the order they are presented. They are simple questions, but they are not easy to answer; by working through them in order, it is possible to identify which of the parts of copyright law apply to the specific problem or fact pattern that you need to address.

Material Type: Homework/Assignment

Authors: Kevin Smith, Lisa Macklin

Developing Copyright Policy: A Guide for Liberal Arts Colleges

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Copyright law is complex and subject to varying interpretations, so developing a campus-wide copyright policy can seem like a daunting task. This guide is designed to help make the process more manageable for deans, librarians, IT staff, faculty, and anyone else charged with developing a copyright policy guide for their liberal arts college. The guide was commissioned and produced by The Oberlin Group of Libraries (www.oberlingroup.org) and the Consortium of Liberal Art Colleges (www.liberalarts.org). Contributing editors were Laurie Kumerow and Iris Jastram. The intent of this guide is not to prescribe exactly what your institutional policy should look like or include because each college’s needs are different. Instead, this guide is intended to guide you through the thinking and decisions required to develop a sound policy.

Material Type: Teaching/Learning Strategy

Authors: Kevin L. Smith, William M. Cross

Whose Book is it Anyway? A View From Elsewhere on Publishing, Copyright and Creativity

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Whose Book is it Anyway? is a provocative collection of essays that opens out the copyright debate to questions of open access, ethics, and creativity. It includes views – such as artist’s perspectives, writer’s perspectives, feminist, and international perspectives – that are too often marginalized or elided altogether.The diverse range of contributors take various approaches, from the scholarly and the essayistic to the graphic, to explore the future of publishing based on their experiences as publishers, artists, writers and academics. Considering issues such as intellectual property, copyright and comics, digital publishing and remixing, and what it means (not) to say one is an author, these vibrant essays urge us to view central aspects of writing and publishing in a new light.Whose Book is it Anyway? is a timely and varied collection of essays. It asks us to reconceive our understanding of publishing, copyright and open access, and it is essential reading for anyone invested in the future of publishing.

Material Type: Reading

Authors: Janies Jefferies, Sarah Kember

Preservation and Curation of ETD Research Data and Complex Digital Objects: Copyright

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This guide focuses specifically on some of the decisions you may need to make regarding the materials you have created or used in your research process, including drawings and photographs, tables and charts, lab notes and datasets, interviews and newscasts, software and digital artworks. It describes in non-legal language the basics of a few important terms, including “fair use,” “public domain,” “Creative Commons,” and “patent” as they may apply to these materials. Failure to consider the implications of different copyright and patent approaches for your own work can limit the impact of your work. Failure to adequately review, vet, and seek permission to use others’ work can, in a worst-case scenario, prevent your work from getting published or (in rare cases) lead to legal actions.

Material Type: Lesson

Author: Educopia Institute

Copyright Crash Course

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The Copyright Crash Course was created by Georgia Harper and is currently maintained by UT Libraries. The Course is arranged into several sections that allow users to explore certain areas of copyright law individually or as a group. The Course was originally created with faculty in mind, but can be used by anyone who is interested in understanding and managing their copyrights.

Material Type: Reading

Author: Georgia Harper

Using Images: Copyright and Public Domain

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Introduces the ethical dimension of finding, using, and sharing images in the context of the undergraduate research assignment. Students will understand the ethical aspects of finding, using, and sharing images; will engage with copyright issues and concepts of intellectual property; and will find and analyze specific images as examples.

Material Type: Homework/Assignment

Author: Alexander Justice

Unpacking Creative Commons Licenses

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This editable resource is a 1-page handout explaining the six different Creative Commons licenses, their symbols, full names, and what users may, must, and must not do according to the terms of the licenses. This resource does not replace Creative Commons legal or human-readable license versions.

Material Type: Teaching/Learning Strategy

Author: Andrew Moore

Permissions Guide For Educators

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This guide provides a primer on copyright and use permissions. It is intended to support teachers, librarians, curriculum experts and others in identifying the terms of use for digital resources, so that the resources may be appropriately (and legally) used as part of lessons and instruction. The guide also helps educators and curriculum experts in approaching the task of securing permission to use copyrighted materials in their classrooms, collections, libraries or elsewhere in new ways and with fewer restrictions than fair use potentially offers. The guide was created as part of ISKME's Primary Source Project, and is the result of collaboration with copyright holders, intellectual property experts, and educators.

Material Type: Reading

Author: Admin

The Open License Playbook Webinar

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Open licensing of instructional materials such as textbooks, videos, and other related resources makes possible free sharing and remixing which reduces cost barriers for students. Creative Commons provides the legal infrastructure for easily sharing creative works including instructional materials but how do the different licenses indicate a resource can be re-used. Join us for an interactive session of playbook license scenarios where you test your knowledge of the OER re-use based on license type.

Material Type: Lecture, Lecture Notes

Accessibility, Disability, & Copyright

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These materials are intended to be used both in graduate courses related to copyright or accessibility and by practitioners interested in learning more on the topic. Topics covered include the Chafee Amendment and how it has changed post-Marrakesh Treaty, the role of accessibility in the Authors Guild, Inc. v. HathiTrust decision, the importance of the Marrakesh Treaty for international efforts to make materials accessible across borders, and how licensing provisions can impact these various rights. The resources include videos explaining the key points of each topic, along with editable slide decks for those who wish to build on the existing materials, activities and options for assignments, recommended pre-class readings, discussion prompts, and related resources for those who want to learn more on the topics introduced in this OER module. There are also teaching notes for those interested in using the module in a class they are teaching.

Material Type: Activity/Lab, Assessment, Homework/Assignment, Lecture Notes, Lesson Plan, Module

Author: Carli Spina

Introduction to Communication Research: Becoming a Scholar

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Welcome to your journey to becoming a communication scholar! We developed this workbook to guide you through the semester as you learn how understand and conduct scholarly research. What does it mean to be a scholar? A scholar is someone who specializes in a particular area of study. For you, this area is communication. And how do you become a scholar? By doing research. But why is it important for you to learn research skills? You might be thinking, I want to be a journalist or make TV shows or work in public relations, why do I need to learn how to do research? Well, if you want someone to watch your TV show, read your article, or listen to your campaign, you will need to conduct research to see if the audience you’re targeting even exists. You will need to research to find out if your ideas are original, what the person you’re interviewing for an article has done in the past, or what makes a successful public relations campaign. You’ll need data in order to pitch your new TV show idea. To be successful in organizational and business communication, it is essential that you learn how to effectively promote successful communication in any institution. This may include writing training manuals, employee handbooks, or conducting in-depth personnel research to ensure overall satisfaction of employees. Also, scholarly research is the foundation of any discipline, and many of the core principles of this field are derived from scholarly research. Because we want you to succeed in the industry, we will spend the semester learning how to conduct research in the field of communication. We’ll start by providing you with a short history of communication research, show you how to gather academic research, and teach you how to write a literature review. Let's get started!

Material Type: Textbook

Authors: Erin Ryan, Karen Sichler, Lindsey Hand

Digital Humanities Pedagogy: Practices, Principles and Politics

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Academic institutions are starting to recognize the growing public interest in digital humanities research, and there is an increasing demand from students for formal training in its methods. Despite the pressure on practitioners to develop innovative courses, scholarship in this area has tended to focus on research methods, theories and results rather than critical pedagogy and the actual practice of teaching. The essays in this collection offer a timely intervention in digital humanities scholarship, bringing together established and emerging scholars from a variety of humanities disciplines across the world. The first section offers views on the practical realities of teaching digital humanities at undergraduate and graduate levels, presenting case studies and snapshots of the authors’ experiences alongside models for future courses and reflections on pedagogical successes and failures. The next section proposes strategies for teaching foundational digital humanities methods across a variety of scholarly disciplines, and the book concludes with wider debates about the place of digital humanities in the academy, from the field’s cultural assumptions and social obligations to its political visions. Digital Humanities Pedagogy broadens the ways in which both scholars and practitioners can think about this emerging discipline, ensuring its ongoing development, vitality and long-term sustainability.

Material Type: Textbook

Author: Brett D. Hirsch

Digital Technology and the Practices of Humanities Research

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How does technology impact research practices in the humanities? How does digitisation shape scholarly identity? How do we negotiate trust in the digital realm? What is scholarship, what forms can it take, and how does it acquire authority? This diverse set of essays demonstrate the importance of asking such questions, bringing together established and emerging scholars from a variety of disciplines, at a time when data is increasingly being incorporated as an input and output in humanities sources and publications. Major themes addressed include the changing nature of scholarly publishing in a digital age, the different kinds of ‘gate-keepers’ for scholarship, and the difficulties of effectively assessing the impact of digital resources. The essays bring theoretical and practical perspectives into conversation, offering readers not only comprehensive examinations of past and present discourse on digital scholarship, but tightly-focused case studies. This timely volume illuminates the different forces underlying the shifting practices in humanities research today, with especial focus on how humanists take ownership of, and are empowered by, technology in unexpected ways. Digital Technology and the Practices of Humanities Research is essential reading for scholars, students, and general readers interested in the changing culture of research practices in the humanities, and in the future of the digital humanities on the whole.

Material Type: Textbook

Author: Jennifer Edmond

Digital Project Preservation Plan: A Guide for Preserving Digital Humanities / Digital Scholarship Projects

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A Digital Project Preservation Plan is designed to help with organizing preservation efforts for digital projects. Initially drafted as a companion guide meant to fill the gap on best methods for preserving digital scholarship or digital humanities projects, it can also be applied to digital projects outside the humanities. This preservation plan is most beneficial to those digital humanities (DH) project creators who need guidance on how to start a digital project with preservation in mind. Although the DH community has shared resources and case studies, the examples available tend to focus on DH development, and less on DH preservation. These resources are also located in disparate locations. The Digital Project Preservation Plan is a singular guide, focusing on DH preservation, as a starting point with references to more resources and related DH practices. This is a working document, available to practitioners in whole or part; ideally, it will be used in the early stages of project planning and consulted and revised regularly. The preservation infrastructure should be designed and built as a collaborative effort from the beginning of the project. As priorities, methods and technologies change, the preservation plan will need to be updated and modified accordingly. This book has been used in humanities (history) and media courses but is applicable to any course that has digital/web project components. The Table of Contents for this publication includes: Summary, Project Charter, Digital File Inventory, Additional Considerations, Preservation Plan-A Summary and Checklist, References/Plan Resources, Appendix A: Project Charter, Appendix B: Digital File Inventory, Appendix C: Project Profile, Appendix D: Collaborators Web Publishing Agreement, Appendix E: Universal Design Checklist, Appendix F: Preservation Guidance Checklist, and the Glossary.

Material Type: Reading, Student Guide, Teaching/Learning Strategy, Textbook

Author: Miller A