All resources in Scholarly Communication Notebook

Research Evaluation Metrics

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This module dwells on a number of methods (including old and new) available for research evaluation. The module comprises the following four units: Unit 1. Introduction to Research Evaluation Metrics and Related Indicators. Unit 2. Innovations in Measuring Science and Scholarship: Analytical Tools and Indicators in Evaluation Scholarship Communications. Unit 3. Article and Author Level Measurements, and Unit 4. Online Citation and Reference Management Tools. Brief overviews of the units are presented below. Unit 1 encompassed and discussed citation analysis, use of citation-based indicators for research evaluation, common bibliometric indicators, classical bibliometric laws, author level indicators using authors' public profiles, article level metrics using altmetric tools. It is to be noted that author level indicators and article level metrics are new tools for research evaluation. Author level indicators encompasses h index, citations count, i10 index, g index, articles with citation, average citations per article, Eigenfactor score, impact points, and RG score. Article level metrics or altmetrics are based on Twitter, Facebook, Mendeley, CiteULike, and Delicious which have been discussed. All technical terms used in the Unit have been defined. Unit 2 deals with analytical tools and indicators used in evaluating scholarly communications. The tools covered are The Web of Science, Scopus, Indian Citation Index (ICI), CiteSeerX, Google Scholar and Google Scholar Citations. Among these all the tools except Indian Citation Index (ICI) are international in scope. ICI is not very much known outside India. It is a powerful tool as far Indian scholarly literature is concerned. As Indian journals publish a sizable amount of foreign literature, the tool will be useful for foreign countries as well. The analytical products with journal performance metrics Journal Citation Reports (JCR®) has also been described. In the chapter titled New Platforms for Evaluating Scholarly Communications three websites i.e. SCImago Journal & Country Rank (SJR) [ScimagoJR.com], eigenFACTOR.org, JournalMetrics.com and one software called Publish or Perish (POP) Software have been discussed. Article and author level measurements have been discussed in Unit 3. Author and researcher identifiers are absolutely essential for searching databases in the WWW because a name like D Singh can harbour a number of names such as Dan Singh, Dhan Singh, Dhyan Singh, Darbara Singh, Daulat Singh, Durlabh Singh and more. The ResearcherID.com, launched by Thomson Reuters, is a web-based global registry of authors and researchers that individualises each and every name. Open Researcher and Contributor ID (ORCID) is also a registry that uniquely identifies an author or researcher. Both have been discussed in this Unit. Article Level Metrics (Altmetrics) has been treated in this Unit with the discussion as to how altmetrics can be measured with Altmetric.com and ImpactStory.org. Altmetrics for Online Journals has also been touched. There are a number of academic social networks of which ResearchGate.net, Academia.edu, GetCited.org, etc. have been discussed. Regional journal networks with bibliometric indicators are also in existence. Two networks of this type such as SciELO – Scientific Electronic Library Online, and Redalyc have been dealt with. The last unit (Unit 4) is on online citation and reference management tools. The tools discussed are Mendeley, CiteULike, Zotero, Google Scholar Library, and EndNote Basic. The features of all the management tools have been discussed with figures, tables, and text boxes. This is Module Four of the UNESCO's Open Access Curriculum for Researchers. Full-Text is available at http://unesdoc.unesco.org/images/0023/002322/232210E.pdf

Material Type: Full Course, Module, Textbook, Unit of Study

Author: Anup Kumar Das

Meaningful Metrics: A 21st-Century Librarian’s Guide to Bibliometrics, Altmetrics, and Research Impact

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What does it mean to have meaningful metrics in today’s complex higher education landscape? With a foreword by Heather Piwowar and Jason Priem, this highly engaging and activity-laden book serves to introduce readers to the fast-paced world of research metrics from the unique perspective of academic librarians and LIS practitioners. Starting with the essential histories of bibliometrics and altmetrics, and continuing with in-depth descriptions of the core tools and emerging issues at stake in the future of both fields, Meaningful Metrics is a convenient all-in-one resource that is designed to be used by a range of readers, from those with little to no background on the subject to those looking to become movers and shakers in the current scholarly metrics movement. Authors Borchardt and Roemer, offer tips, tricks, and real-world examples illustrate how librarians can support the successful adoption of research metrics, whether in their institutions or across academia as a whole.

Material Type: Textbook

Authors: Rachel Borchardt, Robin Chin Roemer

Finding Impact Factor and Other Journal-Level Metrics

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Get an overview of journal-level bibliometrics such as Journal Impact Factor, CiteScore, Eigenfactor Score, and others. Find out how they are calculated and where they can be found! Recommended for faculty, graduate students, post-doctorates, or anyone interested in scholarly publications. For a self-graded quiz and Certificate of Completion, go to https://bit.ly/scs-quiz1 More information about journal-level metrics: https://https://bit.ly/scs-impact-find

Material Type: Lecture

Author: Kristy Padron

A Framework for Analyzing any U.S. Copyright Problem

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One of the most difficult issues for educators, when faced with a copyright problem, is simply knowing where to begin -- which parts of the legal rules and doctrines apply to the specific problem? To deal with this uncertainty, we suggest working through the following five questions, in the order they are presented. They are simple questions, but they are not easy to answer; by working through them in order, it is possible to identify which of the parts of copyright law apply to the specific problem or fact pattern that you need to address.

Material Type: Homework/Assignment

Authors: Kevin Smith, Lisa Macklin

Developing Copyright Policy: A Guide for Liberal Arts Colleges

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Copyright law is complex and subject to varying interpretations, so developing a campus-wide copyright policy can seem like a daunting task. This guide is designed to help make the process more manageable for deans, librarians, IT staff, faculty, and anyone else charged with developing a copyright policy guide for their liberal arts college. The guide was commissioned and produced by The Oberlin Group of Libraries (www.oberlingroup.org) and the Consortium of Liberal Art Colleges (www.liberalarts.org). Contributing editors were Laurie Kumerow and Iris Jastram. The intent of this guide is not to prescribe exactly what your institutional policy should look like or include because each college’s needs are different. Instead, this guide is intended to guide you through the thinking and decisions required to develop a sound policy.

Material Type: Teaching/Learning Strategy

Authors: Kevin L. Smith, William M. Cross

Whose Book is it Anyway? A View From Elsewhere on Publishing, Copyright and Creativity

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Whose Book is it Anyway? is a provocative collection of essays that opens out the copyright debate to questions of open access, ethics, and creativity. It includes views – such as artist’s perspectives, writer’s perspectives, feminist, and international perspectives – that are too often marginalized or elided altogether.The diverse range of contributors take various approaches, from the scholarly and the essayistic to the graphic, to explore the future of publishing based on their experiences as publishers, artists, writers and academics. Considering issues such as intellectual property, copyright and comics, digital publishing and remixing, and what it means (not) to say one is an author, these vibrant essays urge us to view central aspects of writing and publishing in a new light.Whose Book is it Anyway? is a timely and varied collection of essays. It asks us to reconceive our understanding of publishing, copyright and open access, and it is essential reading for anyone invested in the future of publishing.

Material Type: Reading

Authors: Janies Jefferies, Sarah Kember

Adopting Open Educational Resources in the Classroom

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VCCS's "Pathways" Course provides faculty with an introduction to the laws that influence the use, re-use, and distribution of content they may want to use in a course. Activities include finding openly licensed content for use in a class and publishing openly licensed works created by faculty. At the end of the course, students will have openly licensed content that will be ready for use in a course.

Material Type: Full Course, Textbook

Author: Linda Williams

Open Access Explained!

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"Open Access Explained" is an excellent short YouTube video created by Nick Shockey and Jonathan Eisen that explains the reasoning for Open Access publishing. Open Access publishing with a Creative Commons Attribution License Ageement, for example (CC-BY 4.0 Interntional) for publications and research data is currently required by federal agencies within the United States with Publication/Data public access policies. In addition, more International Foundations like the Gates Foundation have established an Open Access Policy effective for all new agreements.

Material Type: Lecture

Authors: Jonathan Eisen, Nick Shockey

Preservation and Curation of ETD Research Data and Complex Digital Objects: Copyright

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This guide focuses specifically on some of the decisions you may need to make regarding the materials you have created or used in your research process, including drawings and photographs, tables and charts, lab notes and datasets, interviews and newscasts, software and digital artworks. It describes in non-legal language the basics of a few important terms, including “fair use,” “public domain,” “Creative Commons,” and “patent” as they may apply to these materials. Failure to consider the implications of different copyright and patent approaches for your own work can limit the impact of your work. Failure to adequately review, vet, and seek permission to use others’ work can, in a worst-case scenario, prevent your work from getting published or (in rare cases) lead to legal actions.

Material Type: Lesson

Author: Educopia Institute

Copyright Crash Course

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The Copyright Crash Course was created by Georgia Harper and is currently maintained by UT Libraries. The Course is arranged into several sections that allow users to explore certain areas of copyright law individually or as a group. The Course was originally created with faculty in mind, but can be used by anyone who is interested in understanding and managing their copyrights.

Material Type: Reading

Author: Georgia Harper

Using Images: Copyright and Public Domain

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Introduces the ethical dimension of finding, using, and sharing images in the context of the undergraduate research assignment. Students will understand the ethical aspects of finding, using, and sharing images; will engage with copyright issues and concepts of intellectual property; and will find and analyze specific images as examples.

Material Type: Homework/Assignment

Author: Alexander Justice

Unpacking Creative Commons Licenses

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This editable resource is a 1-page handout explaining the six different Creative Commons licenses, their symbols, full names, and what users may, must, and must not do according to the terms of the licenses. This resource does not replace Creative Commons legal or human-readable license versions.

Material Type: Teaching/Learning Strategy

Author: Andrew Moore

Permissions Guide For Educators

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This guide provides a primer on copyright and use permissions. It is intended to support teachers, librarians, curriculum experts and others in identifying the terms of use for digital resources, so that the resources may be appropriately (and legally) used as part of lessons and instruction. The guide also helps educators and curriculum experts in approaching the task of securing permission to use copyrighted materials in their classrooms, collections, libraries or elsewhere in new ways and with fewer restrictions than fair use potentially offers. The guide was created as part of ISKME's Primary Source Project, and is the result of collaboration with copyright holders, intellectual property experts, and educators.

Material Type: Reading

Author: Admin