Pine Grove Area School District

Pine Grove ASD K-2
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All resources in Pine Grove Area School District

10 for the Win! Published

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Title:  10 for the Win!Grade: Kindergarten Overall Goal: To have students be able to count by multiples of 10 and comprehend the idea of a sequence of steps involved in a process.  StandardsLearning ObjectiveAssessment5d Students understand how automation works and use algorithmic thinking to develop a sequence of steps to create and test automated solutions. K.NS.1: Count to at least 100 by ones and tens and count on by one from any number.Students will be able to program the beebots to go the correct distance. Students will be able to count to 100 by tens.The students will have to use the beebots to move forward the correct amount of steps. The students will have the squares the beebot travels represent sets of 10.  Key Terms & Definitions: Sequence- certain order in which steps flowSkip counting- skipping numbers while counting, counting by multiples Number line- line which shows number in order, often marked at intervalsProgram- provide machine with coded instructions to perform task  Lesson Introduction (Hook, Grabber): 10 Students will paint hands and stamp them on paper! Each set of hands will represent a set of 10. We will do this all the way up to 100. This paper will be hung in the front of the classroom as a reminder of multiples of 10. Lesson Main:After hanging up our poster with the hands displaying multiples of 10, the teacher would count with the class by 10’s all the way up to 100, while referring to the poster so they can follow along.We will also pass out a number line to the students that highlights 10’s so they have a reference if they struggle.We will make a number line and write multiples of 10 along the side. We will measure out the space between numbers so that it is equal to the length the Beebot travels for each time the button is pushed. For example, if the student wanted to get to 30, they would have to know that you count up by saying “10, 20,30” and they would need to press the forward button on the Beebot 3 times. Each press of the button is a multiple of 10. For this activity, the teacher will break up the students into small groups and they will work together. They will draw a card which will have a multiple of 10 on it ranging from 10-100. The students will have to decide how many 10’s it takes to count up to that number, as well as how many times they will need to program the Beebot to reach the answer on the number line.   Lesson Ending:For the lesson ending, we will regroup as a class and talk about how we felt the Beebot activity went. Then we will count together by 10’s up to 100 again to reiterate what we have been learning. Lastly, we will pass out a worksheet to the students which we have included a link to under our resources, and have them complete it individually. This will give us an idea of the students understanding of this concept and can be used for our assessment.  Assessment Rubric: GreatAveragePoorIndicatorDescriptionDescriptionDescriptionHand Cut-outsStudent participated in the tracing and cutting out of hands.Student partially participated in the tracing and cutting out of hands.Student failed to participate in the tracing and cutting out of hands.Beebot activityStudent was able to successfully move the Beebot to correct answer.Student was able to move the Beebot, but not to the correct answer.Student was unable to move the Beebot and was unable to correctly answer.WorksheetStudent was able to correctly fill out the entire worksheet.Student was able to fill out 70% of the worksheet.Student was unable to fill out at least 70% of the worksheet.  Resources / Artifacts: Number line for students https://www.helpingwithmath.com/printables/others/lin0301number11.htmWebsite which has handprint idea on it https://www.theclassroomkey.com/2016/02/big-list-skip-counting-activities.htmlLesson assessment used in the lesson ending https://www.pinterest.com/pin/287597126178910688  Differentiation:       Differentiation for ability levelsIf a student really struggled with math skills, we could place them in a group with stronger math students. We could also offer an alternative activity for the Beebot timeline where we made the timeline go up by smaller multiples. For the worksheet, they could receive a longer amount of time to work on it and have directions read to them/receive help as needed.        Differentiation for access & resourcesIf the school had limited resources and did not have access to these robots, they could use other tools like toy cars or something they could use to roll to the spots on the timeline. The game could be altered to fit a large variety of resources. The worksheet we used was found online but a similar version could be created by the teacher. Anticipated Difficulties: Some students might struggle with the concept of skip counting. It may be hard at first for them to remember the multiples of 10. Hopefully by making a poster and providing them with their own number line for reference, this will eliminate some potential difficulties the students may have. 

Material Type: Lesson Plan

Author: Carmen Blackley

Lines and Linear Equations

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This lesson unit is intended to help teahcers assess how well students are able to interpret speed as the slope of a linear graph and translate between the equation of a line and its graphical representation.

Material Type: Assessment, Lesson Plan

2-Day Investigation of Soil Samples

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This activity is designed for a primary classroom (outdoors & indoors) investigation where students collect and investigate soil samples and describe the soils, looking for similarities and differences. Students develop a method of recording the data colleted and can present the information gathered.

Material Type: Activity/Lab, Lesson Plan

100 People: A World Portrait

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This website gives you the opportunity see the world through different people all over the world on a variety of topics. Watch videos, see lesson plans about global issues and looking at it from a lense of focus on 100 people.

Material Type: Activity/Lab, Diagram/Illustration, Interactive, Lesson, Reading, Teaching/Learning Strategy

9/11 Memorial: Lesson Plans

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The National September 11 Memorial & Museum has partnered with the New York City Department of Education and the New Jersey Commission on Holocaust Education to develop a set of 9/11 lessons for K-12 classrooms. The lesson plans are divided into multiple themes and across grade level spans. Each lesson draws upon artifacts and oral histories from the 9/11 Memorial Museum collection. They are written for use throughout the school year and across subjects, including Social Studies, History, English Language Arts, and Art. Each lesson is also aligned to the Common Core Standards to ensure relevance in teaching.

Material Type: Activity/Lab, Lesson Plan

Author: National September 11 Memorial & Museum

“We Shall Overcome” Civil Rights Movement of the 1950s and 60s. Published

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The Civil Rights Movement for African American equality is one of the defining social movements of the 1950s and 60s.  Ordinary people took to the streets to demand equality.  This lesson will explore the various forms of protest that defined the movement.  Two of the most notable leaders of the movement were Martin Luther King, Jr. and Malcolm X.  While both men shared the common goal of equality, their approaches were very different.  Martin Luther King preached nonviolent civil disobedience, while Malcolm X demanded equality “by any means necessary.” You will examine famous speeches and articles written by both men to form your own opinion of which approach is more effective to have your demands met.StandardsCC.8.5.11-12.FCC.8.6.9-10.GCC.8.3.12.D

Material Type: Lesson Plan

Author: Tracy Rains