All resources in Oregon Social Science

Advanced Placement U.S. History Lessons

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EDSITEment brings online humanities resources directly to the classroom through exemplary lesson plans and student activities. EDSITEment develops AP level lessons based on primary source documents that cover the most frequently taught topics and themes in American history. Many of these lessons were developed by teachers and scholars associated with the City University of New York and Ashland University.

Material Type: Teaching/Learning Strategy

Alexis de Tocqueville on the Tyranny of the Majority

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"Democracy in America" by Alexis de Tocqueville is one of the most influential books ever written about America. While historians have viewed "Democracy" as a rich source about the age of Andrew Jackson, Tocqueville was more of a political thinker than a historian. His "new political science" offers insights into the problematic issues faced by democratic society.

Material Type: Lesson

Psychology 2e

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Psychology 2e is designed to meet scope and sequence requirements for the single-semester introduction to psychology course. The book offers a comprehensive treatment of core concepts, grounded in both classic studies and current and emerging research. The text also includes coverage of the DSM-5 in examinations of psychological disorders. Psychology incorporates discussions that reflect the diversity within the discipline, as well as the diversity of cultures and communities across the globe. The second edition contains detailed updates to address comments and suggestions from users. Significant improvements and additions were made in the areas of research currency, diversity and representation, and the relevance and recency of the examples. Many concepts were expanded or clarified, particularly through the judicious addition of detail and further explanation where necessary. Finally, the authors addressed the replication issues in the psychology discipline, both in the research chapter and where appropriate throughout the book. Changes made in Psychology 2e are described in the preface to help instructors transition to the second edition. The first edition of Psychology by OpenStax is available in web view here.

Material Type: Textbook

Authors: Marilyn D. Lovett, Rose M. Spielman, William J. Jenkins

K-5 Book List from Multnomah Libraries

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An Excel booklist created by Multnomah County Library to support the Ethnic Studies Integrated 2021 Social Science Standards. The file is organized with tabs for Japanese American Internment, Holocaust, Indigenous Peoples, Genocides, Prejudice, Refugees, Misinformation, and Cultural Diversity.

Material Type: Reading

Author: Amit

Strange Fruit: Abel and Billie

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This video segment explores how the song Strange Fruit became one of the best-known and most enduring songs of protest. In 1939, the legendary blues singer Billie Holiday performed the song as a daring criticism of the commonplace practice of the lynching of African-Americans. Civil rights groups such as the NAACP had made countless appeals, but it was Holiday’s haunting rendition that made it impossible for white Americans and lawmakers to ignore the widespread crime. A second video segment includes the story of Abel Meeropol, son of Russian Jewish immigrants and a high school English teacher in the Bronx neighborhood where he was born, wrote a poem entitled Strange Fruit. This video discusses how the poem would later be performed by the legendary Billie Holiday as a song of protest, bringing national attention to the crime of lynching. https://opb.pbslearningmedia.org/resource/bf09.socst.us.prosp.songborn/abel-meeropol-billie-holiday-and-a-song-born-in-protest/ Sensitive: This resource contains material that may be sensitive for some students. Teachers should exercise discretion in evaluating whether this resource is suitable for their class.

Material Type: Primary Source

Every Student Belongs K-5 Responsibility to Protect

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This lesson utilizes the wordless picture book I Walk With Vanessa: A Story About a Simple Act of Kindness. After a whole-class read-aloud, students divide into groups to create dialogues for specific scenes in the book. The activity encourages students to discuss why people choose different roles in a situation allowing collaborative problem solving and practicing how to care for and protect others. The optional fourth and fifth-grade student extension includes analyzing historical examples and discussing why and how people have failed to protect others and how we can be better allies to those being harmed in our communities today.

Material Type: Reading

Author: Amit

Every Student Belongs: Understanding White Supremacy

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Since this lesson focuses on white supremacy which targets Jews, African Americans and other groups, it is important to be mindful that seeing and discussing the topic could be upsetting for some or many of your students. Some students may feel comfortable or interested in discussing these issues in class and others may feel nervous, uncomfortable or angry talking about this topic. Prior to teaching the lesson, assess the maturity of your students in being able to handle this challenging content, review your classroom guidelines for establishing a safe learning environment and provide opportunities for students to share their feelings as the lesson proceeds.]LEARNING OBJECTIVES  Students will understand what white supremacy is, its history and how it manifests in modern society.  Students will learn more about the alt right and how it has grown in recent  Students will reflect upon white supremacy and the alt right through a writingassignment.

Material Type: Case Study

Author: Amit

Every Student Belongs: Hate Symbols

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Since this lesson focuses on the swastika and other hate symbols—hate symbols that target a range of identity groups including Jewish people, people of color, etc.—it is important to be mindful that seeing and discussing these symbols could be upsetting for some or many of your students. Some students may feel relieved or comfortable discussing these issues in class and others may feel nervous, uncomfortable or angry to be talking about a topic so close to home. Prior to teaching the lesson, assess the maturity of your students in being able to handle this challenging content, review your classroom guidelines for establishing a safe learning environment and provide opportunities for students to share their feelings as the lesson proceeds.]LEARNING OBJECTIVESStudents will reflect on the significance of symbols in our society.Students will learn about specific hate symbols and teach their classmateswhat they learned.Students will identify what can be done as individuals, school or a community to confront hate symbols.

Material Type: Case Study

Author: Amit

Every Student Belongs & Microaggressions: Is That Really What I Said?

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Lesson ObjectivesStudents will be able to articulate what microaggressions are and how they transpire.Students will analyze how words can shift meaning in different contexts and explain how and why communication crosses from harmless to harmful.Students will examine microaggressions from multiple perspectives to compare and contrast how different people might respond.Students will generate solutions and practice responding to microaggressions.

Material Type: Lesson

Author: Amit

Every Student Belongs: Addressing Hate Online

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Learning Objectives:  Students will review key vocabulary related to discrimination, prejudice and specific forms of prejudice.  Students will learn about cyberhate, how it manifests itself online and the impact it has on individuals, the online community and society.  Students will reflect on examples of cyberhate speech and counterspeech.  Students will explore different responses to cyberhate.  Students will consider the importance of countering cyberhate and come up with ways to do so with ally behavior and counterspeech.

Material Type: Case Study

Author: Amit

Fourth Grade – Coquille Indian Tribe Lesson Plans

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Four lesson plans developed by the Coquille Tribe of Oregon for fourth-grade students. Lessons include: 1) People Groups - This lesson will give students a foundational aware- ness of the Indigenous, sovereign people groups who live in what is now known as Oregon—their history, their culture, and the issues that continue to impact them today. When undertaking the study of Indigenous people, it is important to begin with their long history on the land. Indige- nous people have lived in Oregon for thousands of years, in established communities, with estab- lished social structures, languages, and cultures. They were—and are—deeply and inextricably connected to the land. 2) Sea Otters - In this lesson, students will learn about the import- ant role of the sea otter in the history and tradi- tional life of the Coquille Indian Tribe. They will also learn about the long-term impact the European fur trade had on the population of this magnificent creature and how the sea otter’s virtual extinction damaged the ecosystem of the Oregon Coast. Stu- dents will then learn how to identify and diagram the sea otter’s internal and external structures (i.e., the organization of the inside and outside body parts that form a living thing) and describe how the purpose of these structures supports sea otter survival. Finally, students will create an educational poster or pamphlet that provides an overview of the sea otter and its impact on the traditional life of the Coquille Indian Tribe. 3) History of the Coquille Indian Tribe - This lesson will give students a general knowl- edge of the history, ancestral territory, and traditional lifeways of the Coquille Indian Tribe. Working in groups, students will use maps, make predictions, and participate in a close reading of a written text that allows them to check their pre- dictions. The text provides other interesting facts about the Tribe, which should provide informa- tion and generate questions that can guide their learning in subsequent lessons about the Coquille Indian Tribe. 4) Coastal Lifeways - The Coquille Indian Tribe flourished on Oregon’s southwestern coast for thousands of years in a homeland encompassing more than a million acres. The Tribe’s ancestral and modern lands of interest include significant portions of Oregon’s Coos, Curry, Douglas, Jackson, Josephine, and Lane counties. The Coquille traditional lifeways are deeply tied to the coastal environment. This lesson provides students with the opportunity to gain specific knowledge about important elements of the Coquille coastal lifeways.

Material Type: Lesson Plan

Author: Coquille Indian Tribe of Oregon

Teaching About the Armenian Genocide

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Teaching About Armenian Genocide-13 Minute Video LinkArmenian Genocide Webinar- 22 Minute Video Link The video and additional resources available in the Oregon Open Learning Hub of the OER Commons can be used to support the implementation of Oregon's SB 664 Holocaust and genocide studies.  For additional information, please see the ODE Social Science webpage on Holocaust and other genocides.

Material Type: Module

Author: Amit