All resources in Oregon Physical Education

Adapted Physical Education--Basketball Fundamentals

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Adapted Physical Education Class BasketballLesson OverviewDate: January 28, 2018                                                   Grade Level: 6-8Concept: Basketball Shooting and PassingObjectives:Students will be able to demonstrate understanding of the concept of shooting a basketball by standing at a certain distance from a basketball hoop and shooting a ball in the direction of the hoop up to 5 times in a row with 80% accuracy. Students will be able to demonstrate understanding of the concept of passing a basketball to a partner by standing a certain distance from a partner and passing a ball in the direction of that person up to 5 times in a row with 80% accuracy. Students will be able to demonstrate an understanding of catching a basketball by attempting to catch a ball thrown at them at least 5 times in a row with 80% accuracy. Introduction:Ask students what their background knowledge of basketball is. What “things” do you need to play? Have you ever watched a basketball game? Two videos will be shown to the class prior to beginning the lesson. The first video is of a high school special needs basketball player who makes an incredible shot in his only game ever played. The second video is of a basketball game played entirely with students who have various disabilities. Both video links are provided and should provide motivation for the class to play basketball. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nUztRvfhDT8https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oJFr5KVdEXA Vocabulary:Chest Pass- the basketball is passed directly from the passer 's chest to the receiver 's chest.Bounce Pass- the basketball bounces about two-thirds of the way from the passer to the receiver.Overhead Pass- the player holds the ball over their head with both hands and then tosses the ball to a teammate.Shooting form- Put the ball in your shooting hand make sure your body is square to the basket, and put your feet shoulder width apart, and also put your elbow in towards your body. Body of Lesson:After watching the introduction videos, students will come into the gym and partner up. One ball will be given to each set of partners. Students will stand 5-10 feet away from each other depending on the level of comfort felt by students to catch a ball. The instructor will demonstrate a chest pass and then have students practice this pass several times back and forth with their partner. The instructor will come around and help any students who are in need of assistance. When students are comfortable with this type of pass they may begin to back up and get farther away from their partner. These same steps will be repeated for the bounce pass and the overhead pass. Depending on student strength, they may begin these skills with a balloon or beach ball to gain confidence and correct form before moving on to the basketball.After the instructor is able to assess each student on each type of pass, the class will move on to shooting. The instructor will demonstrate the correct shooting form and then students will be allowed to go to a basket to practice this form. One student will shoot while their partner rebounds the ball for them, after ten shots the students will switch roles. Students will be instructed to start only a few feet away from the basket until they are able to make two shots in a row, afterwards they can move back another few feet until they are unable to make a shot. The instructor will walk around the gym and make any shooting corrections that are needed and assess each student on their ability to shoot a basketball at the hoop. Depending on disability, students may feel more comfortable and confident using a hula hoop for the basketball hoop and/or garbage can as a larger surface.Multiple Intelligences:Students will use the following multiple intelligences through participation in Adaptive PE:•Kinesthetic-Students who enjoy being on the go as much as possible. Learn best by doing—hands-on activities and incorporate body movement. Examples in PE class would be walking, passing and shooting the basketball.•Interpersonal-Those students who show good social skills and partake in group or team activities. Examples in PE class would be partnering up to pass the ball back and forth, participating in a mock basketball game.•Musical-Rhythmic-Students connect to an activity through familiar tunes of music. Examples in PE—having a song to keep rhythm of passing the ball back and forth.  Accommodations/Modifications: Multiple accommodations are made depending on the abilities of the students in the class. These are as follows:Deaf/Hearing Impairment 1. Brighter ball helps to make up for a player calling your name to pass you the ball. 2. Lights to signal a whistle. 3. Make hand signaled plays not verbal. 4. Give a written outline of the day’s events. Cognitive Impairments 1. Repeat instructions clearly and slowly. 2. Quick/simple instructions. 3. Use larger materials (beach balls and hula hoops) 4. Give motivation for small goals (catch a ball) then work higher (make a basket). 5. Enhance success rate by awarding points for passes and catches. 6. Many rules can be changed (allow double dribbling, no time limit in the lane, etc.). Visual Impairment 1. Orient player on the court and give an area to cover. 2. Brighter colored equipment. 3. Brighter boundary lines. 4. Beeper in the ball. 5. Lighted hoops. 6. In drills, use a ball retrieving device or set up in partners. 7. Catch the ball with arms extended to feel the ball and bring into the body. 8. Call the person’s name before passing to them. 9. Bounce passes are easier to track and slower pace. 10. Place a beeper behind the goal to help in aiming at the target. Orthopedic Impairment 1. Use the two-hand chest pass. 2. When shooting, do not go head on; easier to go slightly to the non-dominant side. 3. Adaptations to the game a. Travel if more than two pushes are taken with ball in lap. b. Can only dribble twice then must pass, shoot, or take two additional pushes. c. Remain seated at all times. d. Place all players in wheelchairs. One Arm Involvement 1. Trap the ball with the body to catch the ball. 2. Throw with one arm. 3. Overhead passes for long throws. 4. Stop dribble then place ball on the hand for a shot. One Leg Involvement 1. Bring the ball to the side of the body instead of towards the body to catch the ball. 2. Students who use crutches can use the one arm throw. 3. Students who use crutches are successful with the one arm shot. 4. One regular crutch and one Lofstrand crutch helps to free one arm quickly(Adaptation and modification information was compiled by Jenny Walter,  Adapted Physical Education student at Manchester College, Spring 2008).Assessment: Formative assessment: Observation will be used throughout the lesson to correct student form and give feedback. Students who are completing the passes and shooting correctly will be allowed to move farther distances away from their target to increase difficulty for those who are capable of performing the skills. Summative assessment: The instructor will have a checklist for each student to determine if they met the objectives for the day. The checklist is attached.  Materials: Computer, projector, internet access, several basketballs (beach balls, balloons, lighter basketballs), basketball hoops (hula hoops, garbage cans), beeper balls, beeper cones, whistles, specialized equipment lights, specialized brightly colored balls, boundaries, targets, etc. Standard(s): A physically educated individual:·       Demonstrates competency in motor skills and movement patterns needed to perform a variety of physical activities.·       Demonstrates understanding of movement concepts, principles, strategies, and tactics as they apply to the learning and performance of physical activities.·       Participates regularly in physical activity.·       Exhibits responsible personal and social behavior that respects self and others in physical activity settings.·       Values physical activity for health enjoyment challenge, self-expression and/or social interaction.·       PE 8.1.2 Students demonstrate critical elements of specialized manipulative skills in modified team activities.·       PE 8.2.4 Students engage in a variety of physical activities that will enhance health-related fitness (inside and/or outside of school).  

Material Type: Lesson Plan

Authors: Abby Deprey, Chelsey Loomis

Fundamental Movements PK-4

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This resource outlines the fundamental movements (critical elements) developmental progression PK-4 with pre- and post- assessment options and common difficulties seen in student performance. This poster was created by Drs. Helena Baert & Matthew Madden.

Material Type: Teaching/Learning Strategy

Author: Lacey Peters

Remix

Elementary Locomotor Unit

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Overview:This unit is presented as a series of progressive task categories. Each category includes a variety of learning tasks suggested for meeting the applicable outcomes. Teachers are encouraged to select learning tasks that best fit their teaching style and students’ needs. Modifications, accommodations, and extensions specific to your learners are strongly recommended.The National Standards and Grade Level Outcomes in this unit are referenced from the "National Standards & Grade Level outcomes for K-12 Physical Education," book.  

Material Type: Lesson Plan

Author: Dorann Avey

Lifetime Fitness and Wellness

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This course provides a study of fitness and wellness and their relationship to a healthy lifestyle. Defines fitness and wellness, evaluates the student's level of fitness and wellness, and motivates the student to incorporate physical fitness and wellness into daily living.

Material Type: Full Course, Textbook

Remix

Physical Education: SHAPE America Standards-Kid Friendly Gymnasium Visuals

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Kid-friendly visuals for students are imperative to include in your gymnasium decor. The following resource includes five seperate PDF files. Each file contains a kid friendly visual for the SHAPE America's Standards. These may be posted in your gymnasium where you see fit. Standards have been remixed from the, "National Standards & Grade Level outcomes for K-12 Physical Education," book. The Grade-Level Outcomes for K-12 Physical Education can be found here: SHAPE America

Material Type: Lesson Plan

Author: Jason Semanoff

Move Your Way

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Walk. Run. Dance. Play. What's your move? Everyone needs physical activity to stay healthy. But it can be hard to find the time in your busy routine. The Move Your Way tools, videos, and fact sheets on this page have tips that make it easier to get a little more active. And small changes can add up to big health benefits! No matter who you are, you can find safe, fun ways to get active — to move your way.

Material Type: Activity/Lab, Teaching/Learning Strategy

Author: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services

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Physical Education Fitnessgram Data and Goal Setting Log

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The attached resource is a simple tool for students to record their Fitnessgram data and set a personal fitness goal. It is appropriate for grades four and five, and can be edited to include different fitness tests according to your program needs.Cover image: "Running" by alex4663 from Pixabay.comRelated Exit OutcomesGrade FourCompletes fitness assessments (pre and post). (S3.E5.4a)Identifies areas of needed remediation from personal test and, with teacher assistance, identifies strategies for progress in those areas. (S3.E5.4b)Grade FiveAnalyzes results of fitness assessment (pre and post), com-paring results to fitness components for good health. (S3.E5.5a)Designs a fitness plan to address ways to use physical activity to enhance fitness. (S3.E5.5b)

Material Type: Lesson Plan

Author: Jason Semanoff

Remix

Primary Physical Education Creative Dance Unit

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This unit is presented as a progression of tasks that allow students to explore movement through a variety of creative tasks. Students will move in personal and general space, while exploring elements of shape, size, speed, force, flow, and time. To promote student confidence and willingness in dance, teachers should isolate the dance elements before asking students to apply these elements using imagery or partner/group tasks.The National Standards and Grade-Level Outcomes in this unit are referenced from the "National Standards & Grade Level Outcomes for K-12 Physical Education."SHAPE America Outcomes:KindergartenPerforms locomotor skills in response to teacher-led creative dance. (S1.E5.K)Maintains momentary stillness on different bases of support. (S1.E7.Ka)Forms wide, narrow, curled and twisted body shapes. (S1.E7.Kb)Contrasts the actions of curling and stretching. (S1.E10.K)Travels in general space with different speeds. (S2.E3.K)Recognizes that when you move fast, your heart beats faster and you breathe faster.3 (S3.E3.K)Follows directions in group settings (e.g., safe behaviors, following rules, taking turns). (S4.E1.K)Identifies physical activities that are enjoyable. (S5.E3.Ka)Grade OneCombines locomotor and nonlocomotor skills in a teacher- designed dance. (S1.E5.1)Maintains stillness on different bases of support with different body shapes. (S1.E7.1)Demonstrates twisting, curling, bending and stretching actions. (S1.E10.1)Differentiates between fast and slow speeds. (S2.E3.1a)Differentiates between strong and light force. (S2.E3.1b)Identifies the heart as a muscle that grows stronger with exercise, play and physical activity. (S3.E3.1)Accepts personal responsibility by using equipment and space appropriately. (S4.E1.1)Describes positive feelings that result from participating in physical activities. (S5.E3.1a)Grade TwoPerforms a teacher- and/or student- designed rhythmic activity with correct response to simple rhythms. (S1.E5.2)Balances on different bases of support, combining levels and shapes. (S1.E7.2a)Differentiates among twisting, curling, bending and stretching actions. (S1.E10.2)Combines balances and transfers into athree-part sequence (i.e., dance, gymnastics). (S1.E11.2)Varies time and force with gradual increases and decreases. (S2.E3.2)Identifies physical activities that contribute to fitness. (S3.E3.2b)Practices skills with minimal teacher prompting. (S4.E1.2)Identifies physical activities that provide self-expression (e.g. dance, gymnastics routines, practice tasks in games environments). (S5.E3.2)Photo Attribution: KCBalletMedia (Photography: Brett Pruitt & East Market Studios)References:Graham, G., Holt/Hale, S. A., & Parker, M. (2013). Children moving: A reflective approach to teaching physical education. 9th ed. New York: McGraw-Hill.Joyce, M. (1994). First steps in teaching creative dance to children. California: Mayfield Publishing.

Material Type: Lesson Plan

Author: Dorann Avey