All resources in Oregon English Language Development

Bomba: Género de música

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Students will investigate musical genres in Spanish Speaking countries in order to better understand the history and influences that created the music, as well as the cultural connections/impact of the music today. Begin studying Bomba as a class and work through the investigation process together; then students can select a different genre of music to research and explore before creating a visual essay about their topic.The complete lesson plan included is the 4th class period of a 8-10 period unit of study; the complete unit slides are included in the resource folder with all readings, videos, etc. Lessons are in Spanish, but could be adapted for an English class with Spanish translanguaging as many of the videos are included with closed captions. 

Material Type: Lesson, Lesson Plan, Unit of Study

Authors: Kellie Rosenberger, Oregon Open Learning

My Identity Cause & Effect (Why Am I Who I Am?)

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 This lesson is designed for a 90-minute period at the high school level for a dual language Heritage or Spanish Language Arts class. However, it could easily be divided into sections or modified for middle school students or advanced Spanish world language students. In this lesson, students explore how identity is formed through various life influences and analyze the cause/effect relationship between their personal identity and significant influences in their lives. Students will explore the topic through the RadioAmbulante podcast “Sisters” and the painting “Las dos Fridas” by Frida Khalo. Students will practice metalinguistic awareness and develop their translanguaging skills through explicit instruction on the use of transitional phrases related to cause and effect in English and Spanish. Then students will use these phrases to engage in conversations with their peers to discuss how the different influences in their lives have shaped their identities. Finally, students will produce a written summary of the relationship between the primary influences in their lives and the primary characteristics of their identities. 

Material Type: Lesson, Lesson Plan

Authors: Monique Aguilar-Weaver, Oregon Open Learning

My Identity Past, Present & Future (Becoming Who I Want to Be)

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This lesson is designed for a 90-minute period at the high school level for a dual language Heritage or Spanish Language Arts class. However, it could easily be divided into sections or modified for middle school students or advanced Spanish world language students. In this lesson, students build on their analysis from lesson 1 to consider how the influences in their lives have formed their identity and how they can ensure that the influences in their future lead them toward their goals. First students explore how people’s identities are impacted by context through an analysis of the influences and dominant aspects of their identity in three familiar contexts. They then analyze the poem “A Julia de Burgos”, the values represented in the poem, and their own values. Next, they analyze the painting “La creación de las aves” by Remedios Varo to see how it is possible for a person's identity to fully align with their values. Finally, students analyze how past and current influences in their lives have made them who they are and consider what future influences will help them to achieve a future self that aligns with their personal values, and present this analysis verbally to their classmates. 

Material Type: Lesson, Lesson Plan

Authors: Monique Aguilar-Weaver, Oregon Open Learning

Comparing and Contrasting : Experiences that Shape Us

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Comparing and contrasting our experiences with friends and family help us better understand our own identity.  Students will learn comparison/contrast language and practice using it through an activity, two different graphic organizers, classroom discussion and conversations with their parents to better understand each other, their parents and themselves.

Material Type: Lesson, Lesson Plan

Authors: Teri Knight, Oregon Open Learning

Cultural Differences and Conflicts - Storyboards and Fotonovelas

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Middle school is a conflict-ridden stage, particularly for our emerging bilingual students, who are normally known as ELLs. Not only do they have to overcome numerous problems of linguistic and cultural adaptation, but they also have to face challenges such as family or economic instability and moves, often cross-border. Indeed, it is not uncommon to meet Hispanic students: Mexicans, Puerto Ricans, Salvadorans, etc. who travel to their countries of origin, or to the countries of origin of their parents for seasons, sometimes even to stay and live there, despite having been born in the United States and having lived here all their schooling until that moment. It is also quite common to see students who migrate with their families to the United States when they are already 11 or 12 years old and who, as we mentioned, not only have to learn the language, but adapt to a new life, culture and traditions.In this lesson plan we propose to use these personal experiences to introduce basic conversational vocabulary. It is designed for both dual immersion programs and English development classes.

Material Type: Lesson

Authors: Sergio Cano Soto, Kari Kaldahl, Oregon Open Learning

Give me a hand! Bioengineering for Prosthetic Limbs

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 Students extend their knowledge of the skeletal system to biomedical engineering design, specifically the concept of artificial limbs and joints. Students relate the skeleton as a structural system, focusing on the hand as structural necessity. They learn about the design considerations involved in the creation of artificial limbs, including materials. This lesson plan was developed for emergent bilingual students who are intermediate or advanced in their English language development skills. This lesson is adapted from the following resources, "Engineering Bones" and "Prosthetic Party," on the TeachEngineering Digital Library: https://www.teachengineering.org/lessons/view/cub_biomed_lesson01, https://www.teachengineering.org/activities/view/cub_biomed_lesson01_activity1

Material Type: Activity/Lab, Assessment, Diagram/Illustration, Interactive, Lesson, Lesson Plan

Authors: Paulette Rubio, Oregon Open Learning

Mini Lesson: Photographs - Building Classroom Culture

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This is a two part mini lesson.  It uses individual and group photographs to help students develop a sense of individuality and community within the classroom.  This lesson provides a physical and visual representation of students within their class community.  Students will see themselves as individuals who are part of a whole.  For students who do not feel as though their individuality is valued, they have a tactile representation of their inclusion as individuals who are part of the group.

Material Type: Lesson, Lesson Plan

Authors: Jane Aleksey, Oregon Open Learning

Mini Lesson: Snack Mix - Building Classroom Culture

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This is a one part mini lesson but requires a day ahead to prep.  It is fun and involves a delicious snack.  Students pick their favorite snack.  Then we mix it together.  Each student gets a portion to enjoy.  The snack is a metaphor for individuals coming together to be part of a whole.  They can still be separated but it is better together.

Material Type: Lesson, Lesson Plan

Authors: Jane Aleksey, Oregon Open Learning

Evaluating Eyewitness Reports w/ELL students

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This lesson is an adaptation of a history lesson designed by the National Endowment for the Humanities.  The focus of the lesson is on comparing and contrasting primary sources describing the Great Chicago Fire of 1871 in order to teach students methods for evaluating historical sources.  The historical content has been paired with English proficiency standards to help support students comprehension of challenging historical documents.  It is designed for high school, but with some adaptation could be used in an 8th grade classroom.  The lessons are designed to support Intermediate to Advanced (ELP 3-5) language learners, although students with Beginning proficiency (ELP 1-2) would find some success with this as well.  Students compare two newspaper reports on the fire and two memoirs of the fire written many decades later, with an eye on how these accounts complement and compete with one another, and how these sources can be used to draw historical meaning from them.

Material Type: Lesson, Lesson Plan, Primary Source

Authors: Regina Jordan, Oregon Open Learning

Does Equity Matter

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This lesson is designed for students to learn basic social justice vocabulary, such as systemic racism and analyze if equity matters. Through vocabulary development of terms around race relations and equity, along with the analysis of two articles, students will gain an understanding of equity in social organizations. Finally, using the articles, the content-specific vocabulary and their own schema, students will discuss if equity matters in a Socratic seminar.

Material Type: Lesson Plan

Authors: Liz Knapp, Oregon Open Learning

Salud de los pulmones: Cambio climático y el asma

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In this Spanish 3 lesson students will use prior knowledge from a variety of previous units to access information in articles from Spanish Speaking countries and government agencies to learn about how climate change affects respiratory health and what some countries are doing to mitigate the harm.

Material Type: Homework/Assignment, Lesson, Lesson Plan, Primary Source, Reading, Teaching/Learning Strategy

Authors: Vanda Baughman, Oregon Open Learning

Argumentative Writing: Are Social Networking Sites Good For Our Society?

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This lesson is designed to support English language learners when argumentative writing.  It is prepared using the topic selected by my students, “Are Social Networking Sites Good For Our Society?”  This lesson could easily be adapted to meet other topics of interest.  The lesson begins by reinforcing that when one is argumentative writing, the writer must choose a side and have a reason for choosing it. Then, the lesson evaluates others’ argumentative writing to see what it might look like. Afterward, the students have an opportunity to get comfortable with the argumentative writing topic they will be writing about with support of their peers and the teacher. Ultimately, with other support in place, students will write an argumentative piece to the best of their ability with a goal in mind. 

Material Type: Lesson Plan

Authors: Katie Rojas, Oregon Open Learning

Mexican-American history in the United States and the social activism of Chicanx artists as seen through screenprints

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This lesson is an introductory lesson to screenprinting and how screen printing is used for social activism. Further study of the historical background that shaped these screenprints (in the extensions section at the end of the lesson) includes topics relevant to Mexican American communities and raises awareness about important historical events in Mexican-American history in the United States. The main focus of this unit is to learn about the background and history of Mexican Americans through studying these and other Chicanx artist screen prints.

Material Type: Interactive, Lesson, Lesson Plan, Unit of Study

Authors: Charis Martin, Oregon Open Learning