All resources in Open Oregon Educational Resources

Non Majors Biology

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Collection of ancillary course materials for non-majors biology sequence. BI 101 course description: A survey course in biological science which fulfills the laboratory science requirement for non-science majors. Topics include biochemistry, cells, genetics, and evolution. BI 102 course description: A part of the general biology sequence. Topics covered include: cell physiology, taxonomy of microorganisms (viruses, bacteria, protists) fungi and plants, plant anatomy and physiology and ecology. BI 103 course description: A part of the general biology sequence. Topics covered include animal taxonomy, physiology, and behavior.

Material Type: Activity/Lab, Assessment, Case Study

Author: Sascha McKeon

Biology 101-103 Lab Manual

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This lab manual is designed to support classrooms without specialized lab equipment. Recommended as a supplement to the Blue Mountain Community College adaptation of OpenStax Concepts of Biology: Concepts of Biology, available at https://www.oercommons.org/courses/concepts-of-biology-2

Material Type: Activity/Lab

Author: Sascha McKeon

Environmental Biology

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This open textbook covers the most salient environmental issues, from a biological perspective. The text is designed for an introductory-level college science course. Topics include the fundamentals of ecology, biodiversity, pollution, climate change, food production, and human population growth. Lecture slides for each chapter are available from https://drive.google.com/drive/folders/119oj6XXHnQMpwu_rCgczDFrZPMbqGN8W

Material Type: Textbook

Authors: Alexandra Geddes, Jonathan Tomkin, Kamala Doršner, Matthew R. Fisher, OpenStax, Tom Theis

Human Anatomy and Physiology course shells

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Canvas Commons course shells for A&P sequence. BI 231: One of three courses within the human anatomy and physiology sequence that need not be taken in order. This course provides students with the opportunity to study the structure and function of the human body from a systematic perspective, while emphasizing homeostasis, organ system interaction, and complementarity of structure and function. Specific topics include: the integumentary, skeletal, cardiovascular and lymphatic systems. Laboratory sessions include dissecting animal specimens, conducting physiological experiments, examining case studies, using the compound microscope, and studying anatomical models. BI 232: One of three courses within the human anatomy and physiology sequence that need not be taken in order. This course provides students with the opportunity to study the structure and function of the human body from a systematic perspective, while emphasizing homeostasis, organ system interaction, and complementarity of structure and function. Specific topics include: the muscular and nervous systems, special senses, and the endocrine system. Laboratory sessions include dissecting animal specimens, conducting physiological experiments, examining case studies,using the compound microscope, and studying anatomical models. BI 233: One of three courses within the human anatomy and physiology sequence that need not be taken in order. This course provides students with the opportunity to study the structure and function of the human body from a systematic perspective, while emphasizing homeostasis, organ system interaction, and complementarity of structure and function. Specific topics include: the respiratory, digestive, urinary, and reproductive systems. Laboratory sessions include dissecting animal specimens, conducting physiological experiments, examining case studies, using the compound microscope, and studying anatomical models.

Material Type: Full Course

Authors: Kristen Oja, Michelle Miller

Customized OpenStax Biology

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Clackamas Community College customized the OpenStax Biology textbook and moved it into Odigia for BI 101. Catalog description: An inquiry-based laboratory course focusing on cellular biology, genetics, epigenetics, biotechnology and natural selection. Class uses student centered activities in a collaborative learning environment to enhance appreciation of the biological world.

Material Type: Textbook

Authors: Ernest "Tory" Blackwell, Lillian Mayer, openstax, Polly Schulz

BI 101 OER Syllabus and Lab Pack

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Syllabus and lab manual to accompany course using OpenStax Concepts of Biology (https://openstax.org/details/books/concepts-biology). Course description: Centers on concepts of unity of living organisms including evolution, biochemistry, cell biology (morphology and physiology), genetics and development. Lab manual begins on p. 11.

Material Type: Activity/Lab, Syllabus

Author: Laurie Harrer

BI 234: Microbiology

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Syllabus for Microbiology course at Clackamas Community College. Course Description: An introductory microbiology lab course required for health science and science majors. Includes characteristics, physiology and growth requirements of microorganisms, interactions between humans and microorganisms, immunology, infection, and principles of microbial control. This course emphasizes critical thinking and analytical skills in a collaborative laboratory environment.

Material Type: Syllabus

Author: Polly Schulz

Environmental Biology OER materials and links

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Environmental Biology, by Matthew R. Fisher, Editor, and supplemental resources specific to the Pacific Northwest. See https://openoregon.pressbooks.pub/envirobiology/ Course Description Covers environmental topics that are primarily biological in nature. Includes human population issues, matter and energy resources, ecosystems, environmental ethics, and food and land resources. The associated laboratories will illustrate these topics and may include fieldwork. Upon completion of the course students should be able to: Express graphically, orally or in writing, basic elements and functions of ecosystems. Identify and express interactions of humans and the environment. Utilize field and laboratory methods and technologies to measure and describe ecosystems. Demonstrate an understanding of ecosystem functioning and human effects upon ecosystems.

Material Type: Syllabus

Author: Alexie McKee

Introduction to Environmental Science and Sustainability Canvas Commons Course

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Introduction to Environmental Science and Sustainability Canvas Commons Course SUS 102 General Description: This course serves to introduce students to the science behind critical environmental debates and the biological basis of creating and maintaining sustainable ecosystems. This course focuses on critical thinking skills to assess such questions as: how do we decide what to believe about environmental issues? How do we predict trends in population growth, or climate change? How do we calculate and understand uncertainty in these predictions? Should people eat lower on the food chain? How are human activities linked to the phosphorus and nitrogen cycles, and pollution and eutrophication? How can fisheries be made to be more sustainable? How can we quantify and value biodiversity? Can we restore “natural” ecosystems and should wolves be re-established in the west? What is valid science in the global warming debate? Learning outcomes Upon completion of this course students should have the ability to: • Recognize and apply concepts and theories of population biology to interdisciplinary fields such as conservation ecology; • Apply principles of evolutionary dynamics and ecosystem biogeochemistry to understand and predict effects of pollutants such as heavy metals, pesticides, or acid rain on ecosystems; • Effectively debate and evaluate scientific arguments behind such diverse fields as genetically modified organisms (GMOs) or organic vs. conventional farming; • Interpret data critically, and understand uncertainty in scientific data and model prediction in such diverse fields as nitrogen saturation and global climate change; • Calculate carbon footprint, water footprint of human activities • Develop an awareness of the responsibilities of professional scientists.

Material Type: Full Course

Author: Kate Lajtha

Human Genetics Open Pedagogy Lesson Plan

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Human Genetics Open Pedagogy Lesson Plan BI 222 Human Genetics Description Presents the fundamentals of human genetics. Includes physical basis of inheritance, the mechanics of inheritance, probability, sex chromosomal abnormalities, autosomal anomalies, gene structure and function, molecular genetics, behavioral genetics, twinning and contemporary issues in human genetics.

Material Type: Lesson Plan, Teaching/Learning Strategy

Author: Michelle Huss