Open Oregon Educational Resources

Open Oregon Educational Resources collects open educational resources authored and adapted by faculty at Oregon's community colleges and universities.
34 members | 218 affiliated resources

2018-19 Grant Cohort

Academic Writing Exercises

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This is a collection of interactive Google Forms to complement a series of instructional videos by Shaun Macleod and Mark Roberts of SmrtEnglish. Each exercise includes a short video along with original, self-grading comprehension questions and analysis of contextual grammar examples designed for upper-level writing students of English for Speakers of Other Languages (ESOL). When you click on a link below, you will be prompted to save a copy of the form to your own Google Drive. This allows you to edit the form as you wish and ensures that the data you collect from your students go to your computer. If you have questions or feedback, please feel free to contact me at timothy.krause@pcc.edu.

Material Type: Assessment

Author: Timothy Krause

Native North Americans Reading List

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Surveys anthropology and distribution of the native North American peoples. Presents history of anthropological research and the prehistory, languages and culture areas of native North America. Specific native groups will be surveyed to better depict the life ways of the major cultural and geographic divisions.

Material Type: Syllabus

Author: Michele Wilson

College Algebra

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This College Algebra text will cover a combination of classical algebra and analytic geometry, with an introduction to the transcendental exponential and logarithmic functions. If mathematics is the language of science, then algebra is the grammar of that language. Like grammar, algebra provides a structure to mathematical notation, in addition to its uses in problem solving and its ability to change the appearance of an expression without changing the value.

Material Type: Textbook

Author: Richard W. Beveridge

PCC SLC Math Resources

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The material was written with review in mind, but there is enough detail that it would be useful for new students as well. Each topic includes written introductions, detailed examples, and practice exercises that are fully keyed. In addition, each chapter concludes with additional practice problems – those problems are not keyed, although short answers are provided. Many topics also include videos.

Material Type: Assessment, Interactive

Author: Steve Simonds

CH 104: Introduction to Chemistry

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This textbook is an adaptation of the Saylor Introduction to Chemistry book customized for CH 104 at Central Oregon Community College. Low-cost print available: http://www.lulu.com/shop/forrest-towne/introduction-to-chemistry/paperback/product-24034383.html Upon completing this course students will: Interpret the periodic table to describe elements of atomic structure for the elements and to make predictions about properties based on the position of elements on the table. Apply atomic theory in describing atomic structure, making predictions about bonding and compound formation, and interpreting chemical reactions. Construct and interpret Lewis structures as models for ionic and covalent compounds. Describe ionic and covalent bonding and distinguish between the two, including descriptions of substances of each type at the observable scale. Solve problems using dimensional analysis involving chemical substances and reactions, drawing on understanding of the mole concept, formula masses and reaction stoichiometry. Read, write, and interpret balanced chemical equations, using proper equation syntax and standard symbolism to link such descriptions to phenomena that occur at the observable scale. Interpret and carry out a set of written experimental instructions and then to convey the experimental results in a laboratory report. Apply kinetic-molecular theory to describe solids, liquids, and gases. Recognize acids and describe acidity according to the Bronsted-Lowry definition. Use scientific (inductive) reasoning to draw appropriate conclusions from data sets or theoretical models. Characterize arguments as scientific, or not scientific. Make measurements and operate with numbers properly to convey appropriate levels of certainty when drawing conclusions from experimental data. Identify patterns in data by graphical means.

Material Type: Textbook

Author: Forrest Towne

SOC232 Course Schedule

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Death and Dying: Culture and Issues Introduces the institution of death in the United States. Includes a broad multicultural, interdisciplinary approach, including sociological, psychological, historical, ethical, cultural, and religious approaches to death, dying, and bereavement across the lifespan. Recommend: SOC 204, 205, or instructor permission. Prerequisites: WR 115, RD 115 and MTH 20 or equivalent placement test scores. Audit available. This course intensely examines the processes and cultural influences on death and dying. It is appropriate for those who have an interest in these issues, works (or desires to work) in the health care field. This course is a core course of the Gerontology Certificate/Degree Program. Students successfully completing this course will be able to do the following: · Analyze and compare the changing social, psychological, cultural, religious, spiritual, ethical and historical changing patterns of death beliefs and traditions related to varying modes of death, across the lifespan · Describe the physiology of death and dying, compare the effectiveness of the medical model of dying and palliative model of dying on end of life care from an individual, family, and cultural perspective, and assess the impact of legalities and legal instruments on end of life decision making for individuals and families from diverse religious and cultural backgrounds. · Explore individual and family grief and bereavement issues through an understanding of theories, models of coping, spiritual, religious, and cultural beliefs, and end of life practices and institutions, including care facilities, burial practices ,funeral homes, crematoriums, and cemeteries.

Material Type: Syllabus

Author: Michael Faber

WR 115 Syllabus

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Introduces college level skills in reading critically, exploring ideas, and writing. Covers composing essays which support a thesis through structure appropriate to both thesis and reader and revision for clarity and correctness. This syllabus includes open and free materials.

Material Type: Syllabus

Authors: Erica Braverman, George Zamzow

General Chemistry I

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Atomic structure, chemical compounds, chemical equations and reaction stoichiometry, reactions in aqueous solution (including acid/base, redox, and precipitation reactions) gas laws and kinetic-molecular theory, and thermochemistry. Emphasis on engineering applications. PDF available: https://oregontech-my.sharepoint.com/:b:/g/personal/addie_clark_oit_edu/EQ7UKfEXTJxNnhYUHRgaZZ8ByCrmXpLkzzVhHYAfZ2WxXg?e=mdgjCe

Material Type: Textbook

Authors: Adelaide E Clark, Seth Anthony

Body Physics: Motion to Metabolism

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Body Physics was designed to meet the objectives of a one-term high school or freshman level course in physical science, typically designed to provide non-science majors and undeclared students with exposure to the most basic principles in physics while fulfilling a science-with-lab core requirement. The content level is aimed at students taking their first college science course, whether or not they are planning to major in science. However, with minor supplementation by other resources, such as OpenStax College Physics, this textbook could easily be used as the primary resource in 200-level introductory courses. Chapters that may be more appropriate for physics courses than for general science courses are noted with an asterisk symbol (*). Of course, this textbook could be used to supplement other primary resources in any physics course covering mechanics and thermodynamics.

Material Type: Textbook

Author: Lawrence Davis

Intermediate Algebra

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Students will study polynomials and factoring; roots; radical and rational expressions and equations; functions and their graphs; quadratic equations, complex numbers and parabolas. Applications in these areas will be covered. Use of graphing utilities will also be explored.

Material Type: Textbook

Author: Gary Parker

Elementary Algebra

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This book is designed for MTH070, Elementary Algebra, at BMCC. The student will study and demonstrate knowledge of basic algebraic notation, linear equations and inequalities, graphing, linear systems, exponents, polynomials, and related application problems.

Material Type: Textbook

Author: Gary Parker

Seven Wonders of Oregon: A Travel Book for High-Beginner/Low-Intermediate ESOL Students

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This book contains nine short stories about natural wonders of Oregon written for high-beginner/low-intermediate students of English (lexile range of 500-600). Each story is approximately 225-250 words long and features a picture, a set of self-correcting comprehension questions, a writing prompt, and full citations of sources with links.

Material Type: Textbook

Author: Timothy Krause

Portland People and Places: Stories from the Rose City for Beginner Students of English

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This book contains nine short stories about people and places of Portland, Oregon written for beginner students of English (lexile range of 300-500). Each story has approximately 150-250 words. It is formatted as a picture book with approximately 1-3 sentences per illustration. Each story is accompanied by a set of self-correcting comprehension questions and a speaking prompt. All images are public domain except where noted in the alt text.

Material Type: Textbook

Author: Timothy Krause

Introduction to Women's Studies

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This course is an introduction to intersectionality and social justice. I’m starting from a beginner perspective assuming that folks are coming into these ideas for the first time. The course begins with some of the typical patterns that people experience when they’re confronting their privilege for the first time, including resistance, fragility, guilt and shame. I encourage folks to always stay focused on their privileged identities, whichever those are. Since it’s an introductory course, there’s a lot of interesting ideas, but we don’t delve deep into any of them. We explore some of the similar patterns that different oppressions face, like victim blaming, competition, internalization, issues around visibility, disclosure, inheritability and familial relationships. We analyze economic systems around work and employment and question the structures and systems that shape our lives. I encourage students to develop their humility, ally and activism skills. We wrap up with hope for how to reimagine a better society. The course uses a flipped-classroom methodology that centers student conversations during class time.

Material Type: Full Course

Author: Jimena Alvarado

Precalculus: An Active Reading Approach: Elementary Functions

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This book is a collection of activities, a digital workbook, that replaces traditional textbook reading with an interactive, guided-lesson approach to learning. The workbook covers common topics of precalculus that are otherwise delivered as passive reading assignments or lectures. Each chapter begins with activities which introduce students to the basics of a topic. Activities can be assigned, graded and recorded through the use of WeBWorK, an open-source online homework system. Many exercises include dynamic GeoGebra graphs for students to manipulate. Following the activities, each chapter has a Gist section which resembles the expository content in a traditional textbook, though it still has interactive components such as found in the activities.

Material Type: Textbook

Authors: Jack Green, Nick Chura