Mountain Heights Academy OER Fellowship 2016-17

The members of the OER Fellowship PLC will use this group to share and evaluate resources from the OER Commons. These will be both curated resources and those originally authored by our group members.
21 members | 42 affiliated resources

All resources in Mountain Heights Academy OER Fellowship 2016-17

English Language Arts, Grade 11, Revolution, Dickens as Storyteller, A Tale of Two Cities

(View Complete Item Description)

In this lesson, to help you enter into the world of A Tale of Two Cities, you will think about Dickens’s time period and the reasons that he wrote a novel that takes place before he was born.In this lesson, to help them enter into the world of A Tale of Two Cities, students will think about Dickens’s time period and the reasons that he wrote a novel that takes place before he was born.

Material Type: Lesson Plan

U.S. Geography - Beginning Level

(View Complete Item Description)

This lesson introduces basic map-reading skills and directional vocabulary. It orients the students to the geography of the United States in comparison to their native country. The students learn vocabulary to discuss geographic features while practicing the answers to Civics Test questions about rivers, oceans, border states, territories, and capitals. There are suggested teaching strategies for small group and whole class activities to practice the new vocabulary using U.S. wall maps and category games with file folders and sticky notes. For the Civics Test, applicants do not need to locate these places on a map, but they do need to understand their existence and be able to correctly answer questions about them. Lastly, the handout Map Directions for the Literacy Level Writing Practice helps beginners practice spelling and handwriting while using key vocabulary from the lesson. Covers civics test items 44, 88, 89, 90, 91, 92, 93, 94.

Material Type: Lesson Plan

10b. Sons and Daughters of Liberty

(View Complete Item Description)

They were the ones who were not afraid. They knew instinctively that talk and politics alone would not bring an end to British tyranny. They were willing to resort to extralegal means if necessary to end this series of injustices. They were American patriots — northern and southern, young and old, male and female. They were the Sons and Daughters of Liberty.

Material Type: Diagram/Illustration, Reading

Building the First Transcontinental Railroad

(View Complete Item Description)

As the United States began the most deadly conflict in its history, the American Civil War, it was also laying the groundwork for one of its greatest achievements in transportation. The First Transcontinental Railroad, approved by Congress in the midst of war, helped connect the country in ways never before possible. Americans could travel from coast to coast with speed, changing how Americans lived, traded, and communicated while disrupting ways of life practiced for centuries by Native American populations. The coast-to-coast railroad was the result of the work of thousands of Americans, many of whom were Chinese immigrant laborers who worked under discriminatory pressures and for lower wages than their Irish counterparts. These laborers braved incredibly harsh conditions to lay thousands of miles of track. That track—the work of two railroad companies competing to lay the most miles from opposite directions—came together with the famous Golden Spike at Promontory Summit in Utah on May 10, 1869. This exhibition explores the construction of the first Transcontinental Railroad and its impact on American westward expansion. This exhibition was created as part of the DPLA’s Digital Curation Program by the following students as part of Professor Krystyna Matusiak's course "Digital Libraries" in the Library and Information Science program at the University of Denver: Jenifer Fisher, Benjamin Hall, Nick Iwanicki, Cheyenne Jansdatter, Sarah McDonnell, Timothy Morris and Allan Van Hoye.

Material Type: Diagram/Illustration, Primary Source, Unit of Study

Authors: Allan Van Hoye, Benjamin Hall, Cheyenne Jansdatter, Jenifer Fisher, Nick Iwanicki, Sarah McDonnell, Timothy Morris

32a. The Dred Scott Decision

(View Complete Item Description)

From the 1780s, the question of whether slavery would be permitted in new territories had threatened the Union. Over the decades, many compromises had been made to avoid disunion. But what did the Constitution say on this subject? This question was raised in 1857 before the Supreme Court in case of Dred Scott vs. Sandford. Dred Scott was a slave of an army surgeon, John Emerson. Scott had been taken from Missouri to posts in Illinois and what is now Minnesota for several years in the 1830s, before returning to Missouri. The Missouri Compromise of 1820 had declared the area including Minnesota free. In 1846, Scott sued for his freedom on the grounds that he had lived in a free state and a free territory for a prolonged period of time. Finally, after eleven years, his case reached the Supreme Court. At stake were answers to critical questions, including slavery in the territories and citizenship of African-Americans. The verdict was a bombshell.

Material Type: Diagram/Illustration, Reading

Unsung Heroes of the Civil Rights Movement

(View Complete Item Description)

Beneath the surface of many landmark Supreme Court decisions, including Gayle v. Browder, are fascinating stories about everyday people who had the courage to bring legal action against injustice. This activity looks at a few of these unsung heroes.

Material Type: Activity/Lab, Reading, Unit of Study

09c. The Supreme Court: What Does It Do?

(View Complete Item Description)

Despite the Supreme Court's limitations in implementing decisions, the justices often set policies that lead to real social change. So even though justices don't do a great deal of their work in public, and most Americans don't have a good sense of what they do, their decisions are very important. The Supreme Court has real power in the American political system.

Material Type: Diagram/Illustration, Reading

OER Fellowship: Training for Educators

(View Complete Item Description)

This course is set up as a way to provide resources and practice with understanding, using, and creating OER. It contains resources and tasks originally created for the Open Resources Fellowship Professional Learning Community at Mountain Heights Academy--an all online charter school for grades 8-12 in the state of Utah. This course focuses on using the OER Commons for finding and remixing resources, and authoring original OER with an emphasis on providing opportunities for "next-gen" or student-created OER.

Material Type: Assessment, Full Course, Lecture Notes, Primary Source

Author: Sara Layton

History in Pop Culture

(View Complete Item Description)

Who said that history can’t be fun…or funny!??  There are so many references to history in our daily lives and often times we don’t even recognize them!  They bombard us in music lyrics, TV shows, movies, commercials, magazine ads, poems, and even funny cartoons and pictures.  Having a solid foundation of historical events that have taken place will help us better understand these references when we encounter them and allow us to realize the impact history has in our lives.  If for no other reason, let us learn history so we can at least laugh at the TV show or understand the joke they’re making in the cartoons when they reference these historical events! In this assignment, students will recognize that history surrounds us in pop culture by finding two examples and explaining their historical connection.  

Material Type: Lesson Plan

Author: Jenn Beecher

CK-12 Geometry Concepts

(View Complete Item Description)

Includes chapters on: Basics of Geometry, Reasoning and Proof, Parallel and Perpendicular Lines, Triangles and Congruence, Relationships with Triangles, Polygons and Quadrilaterals, Similarity, Right Triangle Trigonometry, Circles, Perimeter and Area, Surface Area and Volume, Rigid Transformations.

Material Type: Textbook

Curiosity Killed the App

(View Complete Item Description)

Students gain experience with the software/system design process, closely related to the engineering design process, to solve a problem. First, they learn about the Mars Curiosity rover and its mission, including the difficulties that engineers must consider and overcome to operate a rover remotely. Students observe a simulation of a robot being controlled remotely. These experiences guide discussion on how the design process is applied in these scenarios. The lesson culminates in a hands-on experience with the design process as students simulate the remote control of a rover. In the associated activity, students gain further experience with the design process by creating an Android application using App Inventor to control one aspect of a remotely controlled vehicle. (Note: The lesson requires a LEGO® MINDSTORMS® Education NXT base set.)

Material Type: Lesson Plan

Authors: Brian Sandall, Rich Powers

What Is Bluetooth?

(View Complete Item Description)

Students learn about electrical connections, how they work and their pervasiveness in our world. They consider the usefulness of wireless electrical connections for connecting electrical devices. Morse code is introduced as a communication method that takes advantage of on/off states to transmit messages by electrical bursts sent via wires, light or sound. They learn the Morse code rules and translate a few phrases into Morse code. Specifically, they learn about a wireless connection type known as Bluetooth that can be used to control LEGO robots remotely from Android devices, which leads into the associated activity.

Material Type: Lesson Plan

Authors: Pranit Samarth, Riaz Helfer, Sachin Nair, Satish S. Nair