Minnesota State Colleges & Universities (MnSCU)

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Mathematics

Precalculus: An Investigation of Functions

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Precalculus: An Investigation of Functions is a free, open textbook covering a two-quarter pre-calculus sequence including trigonometry. The first portion of the book is an investigation of functions, exploring the graphical behavior of, interpretation of, and solutions to problems involving linear, polynomial, rational, exponential, and logarithmic functions. An emphasis is placed on modeling and interpretation, as well as the important characteristics needed in calculus.

Material Type: Textbook

Authors: David Lippman, Melonie Rasmussen

OpenIntro Statistics

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OpenIntro Statistics strives to be a complete introductory textbook of the highest caliber. Its core derives from the classic notions of statistics education and is extended by recent innovations. The textbook meets high quality standards and has been used at Princeton, Vanderbilt, UMass Amherst, and many other schools. We look forward to expanding the reach of the project and working with teachers from all colleges and schools.

Material Type: Textbook

Authors: Christopher Barr, David Diez, Mine Cetinkaya-Rundel

Calculus for the Life Sciences: A Modeling Approach Volume 1

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Our writing is based on three premises. First, life sciences students are motivated by and respond well to actual data related to real life sciences problems. Second, the ultimate goal of calculus in the life sciences primarily involves modeling living systems with difference and differential equations. Understanding the concepts of derivative and integral are crucial, but the ability to compute a large array of derivatives and integrals is of secondary importance. Third, the depth of calculus for life sciences students should be comparable to that of the traditional physics and engineering calculus course; else life sciences students will be short changed and their faculty will advise them to take the 'best' (engineering) course.

Material Type: Textbook

Authors: James L. Cornette, Ralph A. Ackerman

College Algebra

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College Algebra is an introductory text for a college algebra survey course. The material is presented at a level intended to prepare students for Calculus while also giving them relevant mathematical skills that can be used in other classes. The authors describe their approach as "Functions First," believing introducing functions first will help students understand new concepts more completely. Each section includes homework exercises, and the answers to most computational questions are included in the text (discussion questions are open-ended).

Material Type: Textbook

Authors: Carl Stitz, Jeff Zeager

Abstract Algebra II

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This course is a continuation of Abstract Algebra I: the student will revisit structures like groups, rings, and fields as well as mappings like homomorphisms and isomorphisms. The student will also take a look at ring factorization, general lattices, and vector spaces. Later this course presents more advanced topics, such as Galois theory - one of the most important theories in algebra, but one that requires a thorough understanding of much of the content we will study beforehand. Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to: Compute the sizes of finite groups when certain properties are known about those groups; Identify and manipulate solvable and nilpotent groups; Determine whether a polynomial ring is divisible or not and divide the polynomial (if it is divisible); Determine the basis of a vector space, change bases, and manipulate linear transformations; Define and use the Fundamental Theorem of Invertible Matrices; Use Galois theory to find general solutions of a polynomial over a field. (Mathematics 232)

Material Type: Full Course

Advanced Calculus

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Some of the topics that this book addresses are: Vector spaces; finite-dimensional vector spaces; differential calculus; compactness and completeness; scalar product space; differential equations; multilenear functionals; integration; differentiable manifolds; integral calculus on manifolds; exterior calculus. Note: this is a 57 MB PDF Document.

Material Type: Textbook

Author: Sternberg Shlomo and Lynn Loomis

Basic Analysis: Introduction to Real Analysis

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This free online textbook is a one semester course in basic analysis. These were my lecture notes for teaching Math 444 at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign (UIUC) in fall 2009. The course is a first course in mathematical analysis aimed at students who do not necessarily wish to continue a graduate study in mathematics. A Sample Darboux sums prerequisite for the course is a basic proof course. The course does not cover topics such as metric spaces, which a more advanced course would. It should be possible to use these notes for a beginning of a more advanced course, but further material should be added.

Material Type: Textbook

Author: Jiří Lebl

Business Calculus (MATH 148)

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MATH&148 is a calculus course for business students. It is designed for students who want a brief course in calculus. Topics include differential and integral calculus of elementary functions. Problems emphasize business and social science applications. Translating words into mathematics and solving word problems are emphasized over algebra. Applications are mainly business oriented (e.g. cost, revenue, and profit). Mathematical theory and complex algebraic manipulations are not mainstays of this course, which is designed to be less rigorous than the calculus sequence for scientists and engineers. Topics are presented according to the rule of four: geometrically, numerically, analytically, and verbally. That is, symbolic manipulation must be balanced with graphical interpretation, numerical examples, and writing. Trigonometry is not part of the course.

Material Type: Assessment, Full Course, Reading, Syllabus, Textbook

Calculus I

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This course begins with a review of algebra specifically designed to help and prepare the student for the study of calculus, and continues with discussion of functions, graphs, limits, continuity, and derivatives. The appendix provides a large collection of reference facts, geometry, and trigonometry that will assist in solving calculus problems long after the course is over. Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to: calculate or estimate limits of functions given by formulas, graphs, or tables by using properties of limits and LĺÎĺ_ĺĚĺ_hopitalĺÎĺ_ĺĚĺ_s Rule; state whether a function given by a graph or formula is continuous or differentiable at a given point or on a given interval and justify the answer; calculate average and instantaneous rates of change in context, and state the meaning and units of the derivative for functions given graphically; calculate derivatives of polynomial, rational, common transcendental functions, and implicitly defined functions; apply the ideas and techniques of derivatives to solve maximum and minimum problems and related rate problems, and calculate slopes and rates for function given as parametric equations; find extreme values of modeling functions given by formulas or graphs; predict, construct, and interpret the shapes of graphs; solve equations using NewtonĺÎĺ_ĺĚĺ_s Method; find linear approximations to functions using differentials; festate in words the meanings of the solutions to applied problems, attaching the appropriate units to an answer; state which parts of a mathematical statement are assumptions, such as hypotheses, and which parts are conclusions. This free course may be completed online at any time. It has been developed through a partnership with the Washington State Board for Community and Technical Colleges; the Saylor Foundation has modified some WSBCTC materials. (Mathematics 005)

Material Type: Assessment, Full Course, Reading, Syllabus, Textbook

Differential Equations

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This course focuses on linear ordinary differential equations (or ODEs) and will introduce several other subclasses and their respective properties. Despite centuries of study, numerical approximation is the only practical approach to the solution of complicated ODEs that has emerged; this course will introduce you to the fundamentals behind numerical solutions. Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to: Identify ordinary differential equations and their respective orders; Explain and demonstrate how differential equations are used to model certain situations; Solve first order differential equations as well as initial value problems; Solve linear differential equations with constant coefficients; Use power series to find solutions of linear differential equations, Solve linear systems of differential equations with constant coefficients; Use the Laplace transform to solve initial value problems; Use select methods of numerical approximation to find solutions to differential equations. (Mathematics 221; See also: Mechanical Engineering 003)

Material Type: Full Course

Dynamical Systems

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This book addresses the following topics: Iterations and fixed points; bifurcations; conjugacy; space and time averages; the contraction fixed point theorem; Hutchinson's theorem and fractal images; hyperbolicity; and symbolic dynamics. 151 page pdf file.

Material Type: Textbook

Author: Shlomo Sternberg

Elementary Linear Algebra

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Elementary Linear Algebra was written and submitted to the Open Textbook Challenge by Dr. Kenneth Kuttler of Brigham Young University. Dr. Kuttler wrote this textbook for use by his students at BYU. According to the introduction of Elementary Linear Algebra, ĺÎĺ_ĺĚĄ_this is intended to be a first course in linear algebra for students who are sophomores or juniors who have had a course in one variable calculus and a reasonable background in college algebra.ĺÎĺ_ĺĚĺÎĺ A solutions manual for the textbook is included.

Material Type: Textbook

Author: Kenneth Kuttler

Elementary Partial Differential Equations and Applications

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This book grew out of a two-quarter sequence of undergraduate courses offered at the University of California (UCSB), for science majors, engineers and mathematicians. These courses along with a two-quarter sequence on ordinary differential equations (ODEs) and dynamical systems constitute the applied mathematics courses for the Program in Scientific Computations, a joint program between the mathematics department and the College of Engineering at UCSB.

Material Type: Textbook

Author: Bjorn Birnir