Minnesota Digital Curriculum Catalog

The Minnesota Digital Curriculum Referral Catalog (MDCRC), is a searchable index of digital OER for instructional purposes that are freely available and have the potential for alignment to Minnesota Academic Standards. MN teachers, staff, and subject matters members may contribute and rate the digital content. As the collection grows subject matter experts and peer review teams will use OER Commons tools and processes to assess the quality and alignment to standards of the digital content submitted to the catalog.
15 members | 485 affiliated resources

Career & Technical: Electronic Technology

Technology Through Time

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Over the centuries our collective knowledge about the Sun and its direct connection to our planet has continued to grow. Visit this Website for new essays, and related images, each month related to the theme of how humans use technology (past, present, and future) to understand the Sun and the Universe beyond.

Material Type: Diagram/Illustration, Lesson Plan, Reading

Digital Career Library: Broadcast Radio Sales

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The broadcast Radio Sales job includes marketing and sales as well as managing the accounts. College is helpful but not essential. Beginning salary is discussed. Positive aspects are the flexible hours and the opportunity to meet new people. The job includes lots of paper work. Internships are a helpful to getting started option.

Material Type: Lesson Plan

The History of Computing, Spring 2004

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Examines the development of computing techniques and technology in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, particularly critical evaluation of how the very idea of "computer" changes and evolves over time. Emphasis is on technical innovation, industrial development, social context, and the role of government. Topics include Babbage, Hollerith, differential analyzers, control systems, ENIAC, radar, operations research, computers as scientific instruments, the rise of "computer science," artificial intelligence, personal computers, and networks. Includes class visits by members of the MIT community who have made important historical contributions. This course focuses on one particular aspect of the history of computing: the use of the computer as a scientific instrument. The electronic digital computer was invented to do science, and its applications range from physics to mathematics to biology to the humanities. What has been the impact of computing on the practice of science? Is the computer different from other scientific instruments? Is computer simulation a valid form of scientific experiment? Can computer models be viewed as surrogate theories? How does the computer change the way scientists approach the notions of proof, expertise, and discovery? No comprehensive history of scientific computing has yet been written. This seminar examines scientific articles, participants' memoirs, and works by historians, sociologists, and anthropologists of science to provide multiple perspectives on the use of computers in diverse fields of physical, biological, and social sciences and the humanities. We explore how the computer transformed scientific practice, and how the culture of computing was influenced, in turn, by scientific applications.

Material Type: Full Course

Author: Gerovitch, Slava

Basic Computing Concepts, Including History

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This unit introduces basic computing concepts and terminology. It identifies common elements of computers, both in terms of hardware and software and provides information on selecting a computer by discussing the range of computer types, from desktops to laptops to servers. Finally, it provides a history of the development of computing and healthcare information systems over time.

Material Type: Lecture

Author: Oregon Health & Science University

Media Education and the Marketplace, Fall 2005

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Extensive reading and discussion of case studies on educational technology that focuses on three areas: effective media design, relevant educational issues, and the existing and anticipated methods for distribution and the business concepts behind them. The primary case study is Star Festival, a multimedia curriculum about Japan that encourages users to explore issues of cultural and ethnic identity. Students expected to develop a project that shows an understanding of the types of business models that facilitate educational technology in the classroom. Graduate students are expected to explore the subject in greater depth. Taught in English.

Material Type: Full Course

Authors: Gaudi, Manish, Miyagawa, Shigeru

Journal of Technology Education

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The Journal of Technology Education provides a forum for scholarly discussion on topics relating to technology education. Manuscripts focus on technology education research, philosophy, and theory. In addition, the Journal publishes book reviews, editorials, guest articles, comprehensive literature reviews, and reactions to previously published articles. Users can access archived articles starting from 1989.

Material Type: Reading

Meaningful Use of Health Information Technology

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The Health Information Technology for Economic and Clinical Health (HITECH) Act of the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) legislated incentives for the meaningful use of health information technology. This unit describes the meaningful use program of HITECH, eligibility for incentive payments, and the criteria for achieving those payments in Stage 1 of the program. It also describes the standards specified for Stage 1 of meaningful use, including those devoted to privacy and security.

Material Type: Lecture

Author: Oregon Health & Science University

Key Skill Assessment Unit: Information Technology

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Skills in information technology (IT) cover a broad range, from using software packages effectively to developing a critical understanding of the strengths and weaknesses of IT solutions. Developing your IT skills means planning your work, practising your skills, seeking feedback from others and reviewing your approach. In developing and assessing your IT skills, you will learn to use and adapt your skills effectively and confidently in different situations and contexts. This unit is designed to be studied for 1 hour per week over 50 weeks

Material Type: Activity/Lab, Reading, Syllabus

Engineering Technology (Robotics) Model

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Engineering Technology provides learning opportunities for students interested in preparing for careers in the design, production, and maintenance of mechanical, telecommunications, electrical, electronics, and electromechanical products and systems.

Material Type: Full Course, Lesson Plan

Graphic Arts Technology Model

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A course in Graphic Arts Technology provides students with an understanding of the processes and systems common to careers in publishing, printing, and other forms of media distribution. Representative topics include graphic design concepts; art and copy preparation; image generation and editing; desktop publishing; on-demand publishing; school yearbook and magazine layout; advertising and promotion; printing technology; binding and finishing; and screen printing.Students will be committed to lifelong learning as they grow individually, participate in groups, think analytically, create artistic products, and contribute to production of a major project. Students will learn illustration design software such as Adobe Illustrator, photo editing software such as Adobe Photoshop, and page layout software such as Adobe InDesign to create projects that will be printed in traditional and digital formats.

Material Type: Full Course, Lesson Plan

Computer Technology & Repair Model

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This two-semester course provides instruction in the basics of computer construction and repair; emphasizes troubleshooting and diagnosis of hardware and software failures; provides the skills necessary to gain entry-level employment in the field of computer servicing. Students have the opportunity to service and repair a wide range of personal computers while learning theory of operation and gaining programming skills. Students will use a variety of service tools. The operation of each component of a computer is studied and tested while assembling test computers. Designed to provide a solid foundation as a basis for a student's continuing education in the computer sciences.

Material Type: Full Course, Lesson Plan

Building Technology

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Floor construction is the most serious activity in the building process serving as the main link between sub- structure and super-structure. Apart from the foundation, the floor of the building serves as the most immediate support for super-structure. The loads of the walls and columns and imposed loads are first transmitted to the floor before reaching the foundation concrete. The inability of a floor to support the above loads and onward transmission will indicate the ineffective nature of the whole building. To ensure that floors are effectively constructed and serve the desired purpose, the knowledge of appropriate principles and practice is very necessary. Your knowledge of these principles and their application will enable you to understand and undertake floor construction competently.

Material Type: Full Course, Homework/Assignment, Reading

NOAA Careers and Technology

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A career with NOAA could launch you all over the world, from the warm waters of the Caribbean to the winter wonders of the South Pole. The challenges are endless. Employment in NOAA is a job with a mission. At NOAA, safeguarding the public, protecting natural resources, strengthening the economy. It's all in a day's work. Imagine yourself. Careers in NOAA are as diverse as the line offices that make up the agency. More information can be found on the Office of Workforce Management website.

Material Type: Lecture

Author: NOAA

Digital Photography Model

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Photography, as a nonverbal language, allows students to increase their visual perception and provides a medium for creative expression. The history of photography will be evaluated in the context of historical, social, cultural and artistic developments. Students learn to understand the artistic qualities of the photographic medium while acquiring the techniques for utilizing photography for expressive purposes. Instruction includes studio and field techniques, photojournalism, fashion photography, and commercial, portrait, scientific, nature, wildlife and sports photography. In producing their own works and by studying the photographs of others, students will develop a base for making informed aesthetic judgments. Integrated throughout the course are career preparation standards which include basic academic skills, communication, interpersonal skills, problem solving, workplace safety, and technology and employment literacy.

Material Type: Full Course, Lesson Plan

Introduction to Computer Programming Model

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Students will learn the fundamental concepts and terminology of software application development and develop skills in designing and writing simple computer programs. The course provides an overview of the software development process in addition to introducing important programming constructs and methodologies. The course covers such topics as programming language characteristics, integrated development environments, flowcharts, algorithms, variables, operators, conditional statements, looping statements, procedures, error-handling and debugging, object-oriented programming techniques, user interface design, and software modeling.

Material Type: Full Course, Lesson Plan

Video Production Model

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The purpose of this course is to provide a project-based visual arts program, which guides students to achieve the standards in the visual arts and career technical training, by providing students with the technical instruction and practical experiences for aspiring video and film makers in the production of film, video, and new media projects for business and entertainment. Students experience both the creative and technical aspects of filmmaking in conjunction with learning about historical and contemporary traditions and conventions.Students are instructed on the three stages of project creation. In pre-production, students learn the basic principles of story development, screenplay writing, storyboarding, scheduling and budget planning. Instruction in the production stage includes basic visual composition, color theory, set up and operation of camera, sound, and lighting equipment. Students learn to use cutting-edge software applications for video and audio post-production. Mastering and delivery methods, in both traditional and new media, are explored.The course also includes the basics of job shadowing, internships, and job placement. The competencies in this course are aligned with the California High School Academic Content Standards and the California Career Technical Education Model Curriculum Standards. Interdisciplinary experiences and arts activities lead to refining a personal aesthetic, and a heightened understanding of career opportunities in art and arts-related fields.

Material Type: Full Course, Lesson Plan