All resources in Media Literacy & Digital Citizenship Grants

Does Science Fiction Predict the Future? Inquiry Bases Media Literacy Unit

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Students will learn the potential costs and benefits of social media, digital consumption, and our relationship with technology as a society in the three-week lesson. This inquiry based unit of study will answer the following questions: Essential Question: How can we use science fiction’s ability to predict the future to help humanity? Supportive Questions 1: What predictions of future development has science fiction accurately made in the past? This can include technology, privacy, medicine, social justice, political, environmental, education, and economic. Supportive Question 2: What predictions for future development in contemporary science fiction are positive for the future of humanity? What factors need to begin in your lifetime to make these predictions reality? Supportive Question 3: What predictions for future development in contemporary science fiction are negative for the future of humanity? What factors need to begin in your lifetime to stop these negative outcomes?

Material Type: Homework/Assignment, Lesson, Reading, Unit of Study

Author: Morgen Larsen

Introduction to Visual Media Literacy

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This social media literacy unit introduces students to foundational skills in analyzing images and social media posts. It also reenforces critical thinking questions that can be applied to various forms of media. This unit was taught to 9th grade students but is easily adaptible to a range of secondary classrooms. It was also taught in conjunction with another unit focused on social media platforms and content.

Material Type: Assessment, Homework/Assignment, Lesson Plan, Reading, Unit of Study

Author: Shana Ferguson

Let's Get Social: Analyzing Social Media Platforms

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This unit engages students in a variety of activities that analyze and reflect on the role of social media in our everyday lives. This includes options for collaborative group work, reading nonfiction articles, a design challenge and presentations to communicate ideas. The unit also includes a formal writing assessment option that aligns with the Common Core State Writing Standards. Activities can be adapted or combined in a variety of ways to support student reflection and analysis. These lessons were piloted in 9th grade English classes but are suitable or a range of secondary students. 

Material Type: Activity/Lab, Assessment, Homework/Assignment, Lesson, Unit of Study

Author: Shana Ferguson

Identifying Media Bias in News Sources

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Identifying Media Bias in News Sources through activites using relevant news sources to answer the following essential question:Why is this important and relevant today?Students are engaging with a growing number of news sources and must develop skills to interpret what they see and hear.Media tells stories with viewpoints and biases that shape our worldviews.Students must become critical consumers of media which is essential for being an informed citizen.

Material Type: Activity/Lab, Assessment, Homework/Assignment, Lesson Plan, Reading, Student Guide, Teaching/Learning Strategy

Authors: Sandra Stroup, Sally Drendel, Greg Saum, Heidi Morris

Reading Media: Analyzing Logos, Ads, & Film in the ELA classroom

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This media literacy unit was designed and piloted with junior English classes at the start of the school year. Activities can easily be adapted to suit secondary students at various levels. Within the unit, students analyze corporate logos, corporate advertising, movie trailers and stereotypes found in media related to Native American culture. Within the unit, students also learn how to consider the ways in which media appeals to ethos, pathose and logos and how to identify the tone of a piece of media. 

Material Type: Homework/Assignment, Lesson, Lesson Plan, Reading, Unit of Study

Author: Shana Ferguson

Artists, Information Literacy & Climate Change

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This unit explores the various ways information and ideas about climate change are presented through a variety of media. This includes the evaluation of social media posts, research into climate change issues, and an exploration of contemporary art and artists. This was designed and taught in an honors 9th grade English Language Arts Classroom by Dr. Tavia Quaid in response to student interest in climate change and to reinforce key information literacy skills.

Material Type: Assessment, Diagram/Illustration, Homework/Assignment, Lesson Plan, Reading

Author: Shana Ferguson

Propaganda & Animal Farm

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This unit is designed to accompany the study of George Orwell's Animal Farm. Resources encourage students to recognize a variety of propaganda techniques and to connect those techniques to media that they can find in their everyday lives. Resources also help students to understand the historical uses of propaganda by governments and political parties to influence public opinion. Resources can be used independently of the novel.

Material Type: Homework/Assignment, Lecture Notes, Lesson

Author: Shana Ferguson

Remix

Info-luencer: Media Literacy and Civics

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This resource includes multiple lesson plans developed by Washington State teacher John Zingale and can be taught as part of in-person, hybrid, or remote instructional settings. The core content areas include social studies, civics, and media literacy and are designed for use with students in grades 6-12. Additional integrations include ELA, world languages, mathematics, physical education and science. These lessons integrate both state and national civics instruction using project-based and collaborative learning strategies. Features of these lessons include:student researchcollaborative learningdigital learning strategieslateral readingdesign and creation of infographicsTo support these lessons, additional resources are provided to help educators and families with understanding and teaching information and media literacy to young people. Resources include:introductions to media literacyeducator guidesparent guidesstudent learning standards

Material Type: Activity/Lab, Assessment

Author: Mark Ray

Remix

Civic Online Reasoning Website Guidance

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This guide walks you through the Civic Online Reasoning curriculum from the Stanford History Education Group. Their extensive suite of lessons and assessments helps students acquire skills for thinking critically about the information they find online. The target audience is high school but some lessons can be adapted for younger students. 

Material Type: Lesson Plan, Unit of Study

Author: Lesley James

Sample Permissions Request Letter

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If there is a resource you would like to use in your OER project that is not openly licensed, in the public domain, or usable under fair use, permission from the copyright holder is required. Here is some sample wording for that permissions request. Please adapt as suits your situation.Cover mage by Andrew Lloyd Gordon from Pixabay 

Material Type: Teaching/Learning Strategy

Author: Barbara Soots

Best Practices in Fair Use for Open Educational Resources - Webinar Series

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As educators begin to develop OER, one component of that process is navigating concerns around copyright when finding digital teaching materials. This webinar series addresses that and is divided into two tracks: K-12 and Higher Education. There are also two stand-alone webinar options that can be attended by both the K-12 and Higher Education community. All of the webinars will also be available on YouTube and linked to this page after the live event has ended.

Material Type: Teaching/Learning Strategy

Author: American University Washington College of Law