Hawaii DOE Science

The purpose of this group is to identify resources for teachers to supplement their curriculum.
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All resources in Hawaii DOE Science

Grade 3 ELA Module 2A

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In this module, students will use literacy skills to become experts— people who use reading, writing, listening and speaking to build and share deep knowledge about a topic. (This focus on research intentionally builds Module 1, in which students explored the superpowers of reading.) The module will begin with a class study of the bullfrog, an example of a “true frog,” that exhibit quintessentially froggy characteristics. In Unit 2, students will form research groups to become experts on various “freaky” frogs—frogs that push the boundaries of “froginess” with unusual adaptations that help them to survive in extreme environments throughout the world. Students will build their reading, research, writing and collaborative discussion skills through studying their expert frog. Throughout the module, students will consistently reflect on the role of literacy in building and sharing expertise. Students will demonstrate their expertise through a “freaky frog trading card”—a research-based narrative that highlights their research and educates others about the amazing diversity of frogs with a focus on how their freaky frog survives.

Material Type: Module

Plants and Animals, Partners in Pollination

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This site helps students see how plants and animals interact to accomplish pollination. Students (Grades 3-8) identify plant and animal parts involved in pollination, connections between pollination and food production, relationships between pollinators and the plants they pollinate, and ways flowers have adapted to encourage pollination.

Material Type: Lesson Plan

Amazon Water Cycle Roleplay

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In this creative roleplay activity, learners will explore the various processes of the water cycle using movement, sound, and props to aid in comprehension. Learners will understand that water changes forms throughout the water cycle, and that this cycle runs continuously throughout all the cycles at the same time. This standards-based lesson, which is great for the classroom, camps, or afterschool programs, includes roleplay cards and ideas for props.

Material Type: Activity/Lab, Game, Lesson Plan, Simulation

Author: California Academy of Sciences

The Energy of Music

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Students are introduced to sound energy concepts and how engineers use sound energy. Through hands-on activities and demonstrations, students examine how we know sound exists by listening to and seeing sound waves. They learn to describe sound in terms of its pitch, volume and frequency. They explore how sound waves move through liquids, solids and gases. They also identify the different pitches and frequencies, and create high- and low-pitch sound waves.

Material Type: Activity/Lab, Lesson Plan

Authors: Denise Carlson, Jeff Lyng, Malinda Schaefer Zarske, Sharon D. Perez-Suarez

Seeing and Feeling Sound Vibrations

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Students examine the existence of sound by listening to and seeing sound waves while conducting a set of simple activities as a class or in pairs at stations. Students describe sound in terms of its pitch, volume and frequency. They use this knowledge to discuss how engineers study sound waves to help people who cannot hear or talk.

Material Type: Activity/Lab, Lesson Plan

Authors: Denise Carlson, Malinda Schaefer Zarske, Natalie Mach, Sharon Perez

Earth Rocks!

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The purpose of this lesson is to introduce students to the basic elements of our Earth's crust: rocks, soils and minerals. They learn how we categorize rocks, soils and minerals and how they are literally the foundation for our civilization. Students also explore how engineers use rocks, soils and minerals to create the buildings, roads, vehicles, electronics, chemicals, and other objects we use to enhance our lives.

Material Type: Activity/Lab, Lesson Plan

Authors: Geoffrey Hill, Janet Yowell, Malinda Schaefer Zarske

Engineering for the Three Little Pigs

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The purpose of this activity is to demonstrate the importance of rocks, soils and minerals in engineering and how using the right material for the right job is important. The students build three different sand castles and test them for strength and resistance to weathering. Then, they discuss how the buildings are different and what engineers need to think about when using rocks, soils and minerals for construction.

Material Type: Activity/Lab, Lesson Plan

Authors: Geoffrey Hill, Janet Yowell, Malinda Schaefer Zarske, Tim Nicklas

Exploring Earth: Investigations

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This site provides more than 75 earth science investigations. Each presents photos and text (and sometimes video) that help students understand key earth science concepts. Among the topics: earth's layers, rocks, volcanoes and plate tectonics, earthquakes and mountains, surface and ground water, wind and currents, atmosphere and weather, climate change, oceans, our moon and solar system, and earth's history.

Material Type: Activity/Lab, Diagram/Illustration, Interactive, Lesson Plan

Author: TERC

Biodomes

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Students explore the biosphere's environments and ecosystems, learning along the way about the plants, animals, resources and natural cycles of our planet. Over the course of lessons 2-6, students use their growing understanding of various environments and the engineering design process to design and create their own model biodome ecosystems - exploring energy and nutrient flows, basic needs of plants and animals, and decomposers. Students learn about food chains and food webs. They are introduced to the roles of the water, carbon and nitrogen cycles. They test the effects of photosynthesis and transpiration. Students are introduced to animal classifications and interactions, including carnivore, herbivore, omnivore, predator and prey. They learn about biomimicry and how engineers often imitate nature in the design of new products. As everyday applications are interwoven into the lessons, students consider why a solid understanding of one's environment and the interdependence within ecosystems can inform the choices we make and the way we engineer our communities.

Material Type: Activity/Lab, Lesson Plan

Authors: Christopher Valenti, Denise W. Carlson, Malinda Schaefer Zarske