All resources in Gavilan College

Criminal Justice: An Overview of the System

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This book provides an overview of the criminal justice system of the United States. It is intended to provide the introductory student a concise yet balanced introduction to the workings of the legal system as well as policing, courts, corrections, and juvenile justice. Six chapters, each divided into five sections, provide the reader a consistent, comfortable format as well as providing the instructor with a consistent framework for ease of instructional design.

Material Type: Reading, Textbook

ANTH101: Free textbook and hub for teaching cultural anthropology

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* a free alternative to expensive Introduction to Cultural Anthropology textbooks * includes a full textbook and several original videos * includes 10 "challenges" (assignments) * a hub of original and found resources for teaching and learning anthropology * a “connected course” of many faculty around the world sharing instructional materials * an open course freely available to anyone online * an emerging producer of original anthropological videos and other digital content

Material Type: Textbook

Authors: Michael Wesch, Ryan Klataske, Tom Woodward

Child Growth and Development

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Welcome to Child Growth and Development. This text is a presentation of how and why children grow, develop, and learn. We will look at how we change physically over time from conception through adolescence. We examine cognitive change, or how our ability to think and remember changes over the first 20 years or so of life. And we will look at how our emotions, psychological state, and social relationships change throughout childhood and adolescence.

Material Type: Full Course

Authors: Alexa Johnson, Antoinette Ricardo, Dawn Rymond, Jennifer Paris

Psychology, Lifespan Development, Stages of Development

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By the end of this section, you will be able to:Describe the stages of prenatal development and recognize the importance of prenatal careDiscuss physical, cognitive, and emotional development that occurs from infancy through childhoodDiscuss physical, cognitive, and emotional development that occurs during adolescenceDiscuss physical, cognitive, and emotional development that occurs in adulthood

Material Type: Module

Human Nutrition

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This textbook serves as an introduction to nutrition for undergraduate students and is the OER textbook for the FSHN 185 The Science of Human Nutrition course at the University of Hawai'i at Mānoa. The book covers basic concepts in human nutrition, key information about essential nutrients, basic nutritional assessment, and nutrition across the lifespan.

Material Type: Textbook

Authors: Alan Titchenal, Allison Calabrese, Cheryl Gibby, Marie Kainoa Fialkowski Revilla, William Meinke

Education, Society, & the K-12 Learner

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A web-based textbook/course created by Lumen Learning. Part 1 concerns Educational History and Policy, covering common educational policies from 1770's to the present; Part 2 is Educational Psychology, covering topics such as human brain, language and physical development, Nature v. Nurture, and theories and practices for working with K-12 youth.

Material Type: Full Course, Interactive, Lesson, Reading, Textbook

Authors: Ann Monroe, Joel Amidon, Mark Ortwein

Observation and Assessment in Early Childhood Education

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To provide children with a safe and nurturing learning environment and to maintain program effectiveness, teachers must incorporate observation, documentation and assessment into their daily routines. To truly be effective, teachers must develop skills and strategies that are grounded in best practices. This textbook covers topics such as observation methods and techniques, implicit bias, ethics of observation, quality, analyzing data, monitoring, screening and evaluation, meaningful curriculum, and using documentation and assessment to communicate with families.

Material Type: Textbook

Authors: College of the Canyons, Emily Elam, Gina Peterson

Research Methods in Psychology - 4th American Edition

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This fourth edition (published in 2019) was co-authored by Rajiv S. Jhangiani (Kwantlen Polytechnic University), Carrie Cuttler (Washington State University), and Dana C. Leighton (Texas A&M University—Texarkana) and is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International License. Revisions throughout the current edition include changing the chapter and section numbering system to better accommodate adaptions that remove or reorder chapters; continued reversion from the Canadian edition; general grammatical edits; replacement of “he/she” to “they” and “his/her” to “their”; removal or update of dead links; embedded videos that were not embedded; moved key takeaways and exercises from the end of each chapter section to the end of each chapter; a new cover design. In addition, the following revisions were made to specific chapters:

Material Type: Textbook

Authors: Carrie Cuttler, Dana C. Leighton, Rajiv S. Jhangiani

Spreadsheet-based Statistics Labs

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This collection of spreadsheet-based labs was funded as part of the Digital Learning Research Network (dLRN) made possible by a grant from the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation. The labs were adapted from the Statistics book, “Introduction to Statistics,” published by OpenStax College. The original labs used graphing calculators and were found within the book after each chapter. These interactive spreadsheet-based labs are effective for online and face-face courses. They may also be used with the book (see Resource: Lab Mapping to Book Chapters) or stand-alone.Authors: Barbara Illowsky PhD, Foothill-De Anza Community College District; Larry Green PhD, Lake Tahoe Community College; James Sullivan, Sierra College; Lena Feinman,College of San Mateo; Cindy Moss, Skyline College; Sharon Bober, Pasadena Community College; Lenore Desilets, De Anza Community College.Lab Mapping to Book ChaptersGrading RubricLabsUnivariarate Data Normal DistributionCentral Limit TheoremHyporhesis Test - Single MeanHyporhesis Test - Single ProportionGoodness of FitLinear Regression 

Material Type: Module

Authors: lenore desilets, Barbara Illowsky

School Librarians Collaborating with STEM Classroom Teachers : Developing a Visual Model

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This module is part of the Foundations of School Librarianship on using web resources to enhance collaboration between STEM classroom teachers and school librarians, with special emphasis on STEM subjects. The module is built around the understanding and use of data to support classroom projects. The module describes a process by which the school librarian and teacher will collaborate on a high school-level project to explore how to find, evaluate, and use data to produce an infographic. Infographics are increasingly important as a vehicle for explaining complex subjects. They are a wonderful blend of data and information to create meaning and new knowledge. This module is intended as a 'stretching' exercise for school librarians who often have scant background in STEM. The skills learned by school librarian students revolve around identifying data sources, developing evaluative skills, translating data into an infographic, and working with classroom teachers in STEM subject to match resources with teacher identified learning goals. 

Material Type: Module

Author: Patricia Erwin-Ploog

TA 121 - Oral Interpretation of Literature - OER Course

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Students will be able to foster an appreciation of literature and develop creative skills in public speaking and performance. Students will analyze various literary forms (poetry, novels, plays, letters, diaries, etc.) as texts for oral presentation. Students will explore oral traditions and other nonliterary sources and events as oral presentation material. Class exercises introduce vocal, physical and other speaking techniques to effectively communicate a point of view. Recommended: College-level reading and writing skills are highly recommended for success in this course.

Material Type: Full Course

Author: Tinamarie Ivey

Introduction to drama

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This is a module framework. It can be viewed online or downloaded as a zip file. As taught in Autumn Semester 2010. This module is designed to provide an introduction to the analysis and performance of drama. It has three main aims: 1) To provide an introduction to the analysis of drama; 2) To give a taste of the wide range of performance convention in history, from Ancient Greek tragedy to nineteenth-century naturalism; 3) To foreground drama as a performance medium rather than a form of literature. At Nottingham, we approach drama as a performance medium: an event within a specific time, space and locale, in which real people and objects are presented to other people in real, shared space. It is always a social event, so we learn to think about the people who do the performing, the place they perform in, and the people they perform to. Written texts may be looked at as much for information about the modes and places of performance as for what they represent or ‘say’. It is to be understood that the space itself and the mode of performing in it create meaning as much as do pre-scripted words. We emphasise the fact that performance analysis is not literary criticism, and that play scripts should not be read simply as texts. The interpretation and analysis of drama requires different skills. The seminars on the module will provide opportunities for you to develop these skills yourself, while the lectures are designed to provide you with the kind of information necessary for an analysis of performance as an event in real historical time and space. The module also aims to introduce a range of historical examples of theatre practice, drawn from several different moments in theatre history. The lectures will explore what we know about the performance conventions of Greek tragedy, medieval religious plays, Shakespeare's plays and Restoration/Augustan comedy, turning lastly to the arrival of naturalism as an approach to performance in the late nineteenth century. Finally, we believe that a seminal way of learning to understand how theatre works is getting involved in performance itself. The workshops held in the Autumn semester provide structured opportunities to discuss the kind of decisions that are taken when a script is realised on stage and to experience the practical consequences of a theatre director’s decision making. More information on the format of workshops is provided below. Suitable for study at undergraduate level 1. Dr James Moran, School of English Studies. Dr Moran's research is primarily concerned with modern drama. His monograph Staging the Easter Rising (2005) explores the connections between literature and politics, and was reviewed as 'a brave, confident book' in the Times Literary Supplement and as a 'terrific read' in the Irish Times. He also edited Four Irish Rebel Plays (2007), a volume described as 'fascinating' by Books Ireland and by Studies in Theatre and Performance. His latest monograph, Irish Birmingham: A History (2010), has been published by Liverpool University Press and reviewed as follows in the Irish Times: 'Even if you have no ties with Birmingham, if you are interested in culture or history, you'll enjoy Irish Birmingham: A History...Moran is a splendid writer, and a very engaging one'. Dr Moran is currently Head of Drama at the University of Nottingham.

Material Type: Syllabus

Author: Dr James Moran

TA 147 - Introduction to Theater

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A comprehensive introduction to the art, history and workings of the theater. Students will be given a broad and general background in theater including production elements (lights, sound, sets, costumes, make-up, etc...) of acting, theater history and criticism. Students will attend live performances, view videos of plays and write reviews of live and filmed theater. Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to: Develop a working definition of theatre. Identify the roles of theatre practitioners. Identify the basic structure of a play script. Apply the basic criteria for theatre criticism. Identify the various theatre genres. Identify and describe the functions and use of different lighting, sound and other stage equipment. Examine the values within the range of the human experience and its impact in the expression of Theater.

Material Type: Full Course

Authors: Dan Stone, Tinamarie Ivey

Fall 17 – Introduction to Theater – Learning Resources

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In the sections of Chapter 1, we’ve included interactive learning content to test your knowledge over Theater history and production, with many knowledge checks over Theatrical Worlds, Edited by Charles Mitchell, as well as Playhouse Square theaters and productions, and other theater content. This content can be used by Theater students anywhere in the world, but will be helpful to those reading Theatrical Worlds. In Chapter 2, there are analyses of local live performance, written by CSU Theater students and Heather Caprette. They serve as examples of exemplary work for the open assignment 2, as well as provide information about performances of interest to the public theater goers. * A Note of Caution: These analyses can not be copied by other Theater students to satisfy the requirement for an assignment in a course, but will give an idea of what a well written analysis paper looks like. Copying of these assignments to turn in as your own assignment constitutes plagiarism and academic misconduct. Chapter 3, is an example of how a group of students working together on the recreation of a scene or small part of a play can share their ideas. The part should be less than 10% of a play. The example is being produced by Heather Caprette, MFA, but in the assignment, different students would work on various aspects of the theater production. Elements recreated include: dialogue, character design, set design, stage lighting, costume design, and sound design. At this time, it’s best to view the Pressbook in Chrome browser, due to some display issues caused by a recent upgrade.

Material Type: Textbook

Authors: Heather Caprette, Lisa Bernd, Theater Students of Cleveland State University

Introduction to Water Systems Technology

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Explores the entire Water Systems Technology program, which includes the class and degree offerings. Reviews the State Water Resources Control Board Division of Drinking Water operator certification requirements (California). Various topics include water supply, water quality, drinking water treatment and distribution, wastewater and recycled water and other related topics.

Material Type: Textbook

Author: Ian Joslin

Waterworks Mathematics

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Introduces basic mathematical principles related to drinking water distribution and treatment systems and wastewater treatment plants; including areas, volumes, pressure, flow rates, unit conversion, chemical dosage, detention time, and filtration rates. Focuses on mathematical computations within the expected range of knowledge on the State Water Resources Control Board exams for Drinking Water Distribution 1 and 2, Drinking Water Treatment 1 and 2, and Wastewater Treatment 1 and 2 (California).

Material Type: Textbook

Authors: Mike Alvord, Regina Blasberg