All resources in Evangel University

Test Module

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This is a test module for the Social Work Distance Education conference.  The materials are drawn from the open textbook Critical Inquiry in Social Work, adapted by Matt DeCarlo.  This book was adapted from Principles of Sociological Inquiry – Qualitative and Quantitative Methods by Susan Blackstone.  

Material Type: Module

Author: Matthew DeCarlo

Social Problems: Continuity and Change

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Social Problems: Continuity and Change by Steve Barkan is a realistic but motivating look at the many issues that are facing our society today. As this book’s subtitle, Continuity and Change, implies, social problems are persistent, but they have also improved in the past and can be improved in the present and future, provided that our nation has the wisdom and will to address them. It is easy for students to read a social problems textbook and come away feeling frustrated by the enormity of the many social problems facing us today. Social Problems: Continuity and Change certainly does not minimize the persistence of social problems, but neither does it overlook the possibilities for change offered by social research and by the activities of everyday citizens working to make a difference. Readers of Steve Barkan’s book will find many examples of how social problems have been improved and of strategies that hold great potential for solving them today and in the future. You will find several pedagogical features help to convey the “continuity and change” theme of this text and the service sociology vision in which it is grounded: Each chapter begins with a “Social Problems in the News” story related to the social problem discussed in that chapter. These stories provide an interesting starting point for the chapter’s discussion and show its relevance for real-life issues. Three types of boxes in each chapter provide examples of how social problems have been changed and can be changed.

Material Type: Textbook

Author: Steven Barkan

Research Methods in Psychology Ancillary Set

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The purpose of this project was to create a set of ancillary materials for the open textbook Research Methods in Psychology, a textbook intended to be used for psychology research methods courses. At the start of this grant, the textbook was available through the University of Minnesota’s Open Textbook Library (open.lib.umn.edu/psychologyresearchmethods/) and could be found in most open material repositories. Since this grant was proposed, however, a more recent version of the text has been released by Price, Jhangiani, Chiang, Leighton, and Cuttler (https://opentext.wsu.edu/carriecuttler/). The resources developed for this grant can be used for the new edition of the text, although they were written for the earlier version.

Material Type: Homework/Assignment

Author: Judy Orton Grissett

Introduction to Psychology Course Content

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Introductory psychology course developed through the Ohio Department of Higher Education OER Innovation Grant. The course is part of the Ohio Transfer Module and is also named OSS015. For more information about credit transfer between Ohio colleges and universities please visit: www.ohiohighered.org/transfer. Team Lead Vincent Granito Lorain County Community College Content Contributors Nicole Brandt Columbus State Community College Lynne Gabriel Lakeland Community College Jackie Sample Central Ohio Technical College Librarian Rachel Dilley Columbus State Community College Review Team Melissa Beers Ohio State University Brian Gerber Stark State College

Material Type: Full Course

Authors: Brian Gerber, Jackie Samle, Lynne Gabriel, Melissa Beers, Nicole Brandt, Rachel Dilley, Vincent Granito

Research Methods in Psychology

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Research Methods in Psychology is intended to provide a fundamental understanding of the basics of experimental research in the psychological sciences. Research Methods in Psychology adapted by Michael G. Dudley is licensed under Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 license. Research Methods in Psychology is adapted from a work produced and distributed under a Creative Commons license (CC BY-NC-SA) in 2010 by a publisher who has requested that they and the original author not receive attribution. This adapted edition is based on an adaptation produced by the University of Minnesota Libraries Publishing through the eLearning Support Initiative. This adapted edition was created by Michael G. Dudley with support from the Palomar College Foundation. This adaptation has significantly altered the original 2010 text and removed images. This work is made available under the terms of a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike license.

Material Type: Textbook

Author: Michael Dudley

Psychology

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Psychology is designed to meet scope and sequence requirements for the single-semester introduction to psychology course. The book offers a comprehensive treatment of core concepts, grounded in both classic studies and current and emerging research. The text also includes coverage of the DSM-5 in examinations of psychological disorders. Psychology incorporates discussions that reflect the diversity within the discipline, as well as the diversity of cultures and communities across the globe.Senior Contributing AuthorsRose M. Spielman, Formerly of Quinnipiac UniversityContributing AuthorsKathryn Dumper, Bainbridge State CollegeWilliam Jenkins, Mercer UniversityArlene Lacombe, Saint Joseph's UniversityMarilyn Lovett, Livingstone CollegeMarion Perlmutter, University of Michigan

Material Type: Full Course

World History in the Early Modern and Modern Eras (1600-Present)

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This course will present a comparative overview of world history from the 17th century to the present era. The student will examine the origins of major economic, political, social, cultural, and technological trends of the past 400 years and explore the impact of these trends on world societies. Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to: Think critically about world history in the early modern and modern eras; Assess how global trade networks shaped the economic development of Asia, Europe, and the Americas in the 17th and 18th centuries; Identify the origins of the Reformation and Counter-Reformation in Europe and assess the social and political consequences of these movements for the peoples of Europe; Identify the origins of the Enlightenment in Europe and assess how Enlightenment ideas led to political and social revolutions in Europe and the Americas; Identify the origins of the Scientific and Industrial Revolutions in Europe and assess how these intellectual and economic movements altered social, political, and economic life across the globe in the 18th and 19th centuries; Compare and contrast how European imperialism affected the states and peoples of Asia, Africa, and the Americas in the 19th century; Identify the origins of World War I and analyze how the war's outcome altered economic and political balances of power throughout the world; Identify the origins of totalitarian political movements across the globe in the 1920s and 1930s and assess how these movements led to World War II; Analyze how World War II reshaped power balances throughout the world and led to the emergence of the United States and the Soviet Union as global superpowers; Assess how decolonization movements in the 1950s and 1960s altered political, economic, and social relationships between the United States, the nations of Europe, and developing countries throughout the world; Assess how the end of the Cold War led to political and economic realignments throughout the world and encouraged the growth of new global markets and systems of trade and information exchange; Analyze and interpret primary source documents from the 17th century through the present, using historical research methods. (History 103)

Material Type: Assessment, Full Course, Lecture, Lecture Notes, Reading, Syllabus, Textbook

Succeeding at Your Internship: A Handbook Written for and with Students

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There are several textbooks for students whose majors include internships in human services, broadly defi­­­ned, such as case management, counseling, criminal justice, and social work. Most of these books are written in an academic format. Typically, it involves an introduction to a theoretical orientation that concerns working with others followed by a series of chapters devoted to learning professional skills associated with a given discipline. This approach is fine, as far as it goes, but also has two drawbacks. One is that the texts are usually sold by main stream publishers, which means they are expensive. Another is that they seldom address what might be described as the experiential dimension of the internship that most beginners face on their own. This new book addresses both concerns. The fact that it is offered as a free text addresses the first issue, of course, but the second one requires a new approach. It began with asking students to talk about what they experienced when going through their first internship and what they would tell others about how to make it a successful one. That work led to a structured narrative about basic practical topics, such as finding an internship, getting started there, making effective use of supervision, understanding ethics, appreciating cultural diversity, becoming competent, and completing the internship. The text includes descriptions, suggestions, and exercises. It may be used as either a primary course text or, due to its relative brevity, a supplemental one. Although the lead editor is an experienced clinician and professor who has supervised internships for a variety of human services majors over many years, the book was written with and for students to make it more readable and more useful.

Material Type: Textbook

Authors: Christopher J. Mruk, John C. Moor

An Introduction to Psychological Statistics

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This work has been superseded by Introduction to Statistics in the Psychological Sciences available from https://irl.umsl.edu/oer/25/. - We are constantly bombarded by information, and finding a way to filter that information in an objective way is crucial to surviving this onslaught with your sanity intact. This is what statistics, and logic we use in it, enables us to do. Through the lens of statistics, we learn to find the signal hidden in the noise when it is there and to know when an apparent trend or pattern is really just randomness. The study of statistics involves math and relies upon calculations of numbers. But it also relies heavily on how the numbers are chosen and how the statistics are interpreted. This work was created as part of the University of Missouri’s Affordable and Open Access Educational Resources Initiative (https://www.umsystem.edu/ums/aa/oer). The contents of this work have been adapted from the following Open Access Resources: Online Statistics Education: A Multimedia Course of Study (http://onlinestatbook.com/). Project Leader: David M. Lane, Rice University. Changes to the original works were made by Dr. Garett C. Foster in the Department of Psychological Sciences to tailor the text to fit the needs of the introductory statistics course for psychology majors at the University of Missouri – St. Louis. Materials from the original sources have been combined, reorganized, and added to by the current author, and any conceptual, mathematical, or typographical errors are the responsibility of the current author.

Material Type: Textbook

Authors: Dan Osherson, Foster Garett C, Garett C Foster, Hebl Mikki, Mikki Hebl, Rice University, Rudy Guerra, Scott David, University Of Missouri-st Louis, Zimmer Heidi

Psychology 2e

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Psychology 2e is designed to meet scope and sequence requirements for the single-semester introduction to psychology course. The book offers a comprehensive treatment of core concepts, grounded in both classic studies and current and emerging research. The text also includes coverage of the DSM-5 in examinations of psychological disorders. Psychology incorporates discussions that reflect the diversity within the discipline, as well as the diversity of cultures and communities across the globe. The second edition contains detailed updates to address comments and suggestions from users. Significant improvements and additions were made in the areas of research currency, diversity and representation, and the relevance and recency of the examples. Many concepts were expanded or clarified, particularly through the judicious addition of detail and further explanation where necessary. Finally, the authors addressed the replication issues in the psychology discipline, both in the research chapter and where appropriate throughout the book. Changes made in Psychology 2e are described in the preface to help instructors transition to the second edition. The first edition of Psychology by OpenStax is available in web view here.

Material Type: Textbook

Authors: Marilyn D. Lovett, Rose M. Spielman, William J. Jenkins

Introduction to Social Work at Ferris State University

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This book was written by MSW students as their final project for their Capstone class. Students were each assigned a chapter of the book to write to show that they had achieved competency as a Master’s level social worker. Chapters were assigned based on student interest and experience in certain areas of the field.

Material Type: Textbook

Authors: Aikia Fricke, Ainslee McVay, Brian Majszak, Colton Cnossen, Eden Airbets, Jenae Finney, Jennifer Lamoreaux, Kassandra Weinberg, Katlin Hetzel, Keith Bogucki, Lindsey Bronold, Melissa Ryba, Micah Beckman, Sandra Tiffany, Tracey Stevens, Troy Richard, Tyler Felty

Remix

Dynamics of Interpersonal Relations I

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Dynamics of Interpersonal Relations I, is an exploration of the small-group process through participation, interpretation, and study. A major focus is on the class itself as an interacting group providing for personal, interpersonal, and intellectual challenges. The modules are designed for undergraduate students to become familiar with group dynamics. This resource has a syllabus, OpenStax text chapters, TedTalks, and group activities. Thank you to Jennifer Burns for sharing this resource.

Material Type: Full Course

Author: Patricia Lauziere

Social Work & Social Welfare: Modern Practice in a Diverse World

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This text is intended for use in introductory social work classes at the college level. Chapter topics include the foundations and history of social work and social welfare; generalist social work; ethics and values; social policy; race & ethnicity; sex, sexism, & gender; LGBTQ+ clients; poverty and financial assistance; school social work; families and children; healthcare and disabilities; substance use; mental health; criminal justice; and older clients. Mick Cullen, LCSW, CADC, MA, is a professor and chair of the social work/human services department at College of Lake County in Grayslake, Illinois. Matthew Cullen, LICSW, LCSW, M.Ed., is a counselor at Green River College in Auburn, Washington.

Material Type: Textbook

Authors: Mick Cullen, Matthew Cullen

Exploring Business

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The author's goals in writing Exploring Business were simple: (1) introduce students to business in an exciting way and (2) provide faculty with a fully developed teaching package that allows them to do the former. Toward those ends, the following features are included in this text:1- Integrated (Optional) Nike Case Study: A Nike case study is available for instructors who wish to introduce students to business using an exciting and integrated case. Through an in-depth study of a real company, students learn about the functional areas of business and how these areas fit together. Studying a dynamic organization on a real-time basis allows students to discover the challenges that it faces, and exposes them to critical issues affecting the business, such as globalization, ethics and social responsibility, product innovation, diversity, supply chain management, and e-business.2- A Progressive (Optional) Business Plan: Having students develop a business plan in the course introduces students to the excitement and challenges of starting a business and helps them discover how the functional areas of business interact. This textbook package includes an optionalintegrated business plan project modeled after one refined by the author and her teaching team over the past ten years.3- AACSB Emphasis: The text provides end-of-chapter questions, problems, and cases that ask students to do more than regurgitate information. Most require students to gather information, assess a situation, think about it critically, and reach a conclusion. Each chapter presents ten Questions and Problems as well as five cases on areas of skill and knowledge endorsed by AACSB: Learning on the Web, Career Opportunities, The Ethics Angle, Team-Building Skills, and The Global View. More than 70% of end-of-chapter items help students build skills in areas designated as critical by AACSB, including analytical skills, ethical awareness and reasoning abilities, multicultural understanding and globalization, use of information technology, and communications and team oriented skills. Each AACSB inspired exercise is identified by an AACSB tag and a note indicating the relevant skill area.4- Author-Written Instructor Manual (IM): For the past eleven years, Karen Collins has been developing, coordinating and teaching (to over 3,500 students) an Introduction to Business course. Sections of the course have been taught by a mix of permanent faculty, graduate students, and adjuncts.

Material Type: Case Study, Textbook

Author: Karen Collins

Introduction to Business

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This course is designed as a survey course that will expose you to business terminology, concepts, and current business issues, with the intent of helping students develop a viable business vocabulary, foster critical and analytical thinking, and refine business decision-making skills.

Material Type: Full Course

Introduction to Business

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Business can refer to a particular organization such as WalMart or to an entire market sector—for example, “the music business.” Compound forms such as agribusiness represent subsets of the word’s broader meaning, which encompasses all activity by suppliers of goods and services in the agricultural industry.  Business can also refer to an individual who earns his or her income by working from home selling items through an online auction site like eBay.  The concept of business has enough definitions and applications that we could almost say that everything is business. Throughout this course we will explore the various functions, roles, and characteristics of business while keeping in mind that business is like the air we breathe—everywhere!

Material Type: Full Course, Textbook

Principles of Marketing

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Marketing is a tool used by companies, organizations, and people to shape our perceptions and persuade us to change our behavior. The most effective marketing uses a well-designed strategy and a variety of techniques to alter how people think about and interact with the object in question. Less-effective marketing causes people to turn off, tune out, or not even notice. Why should you care about marketing? Marketing is an ever-present force in modern society, and it can work amazingly well to influence what we do and why we do it.

Material Type: Full Course, Textbook