Evangel University

28 members | 177 affiliated resources

All resources in Evangel University

Criminal Justice: An Overview of the System

(View Complete Item Description)

This book provides an overview of the criminal justice system of the United States. It is intended to provide the introductory student a concise yet balanced introduction to the workings of the legal system as well as policing, courts, corrections, and juvenile justice. Six chapters, each divided into five sections, provide the reader a consistent, comfortable format as well as providing the instructor with a consistent framework for ease of instructional design.

Material Type: Reading, Textbook

Neurobiology of Trauma

(View Complete Item Description)

This is an introductory level module for undergraduate or beginning graduate level social work students, or for public child welfare staff. Basic information about the brain and the impact of traumatic experiences are covered. The outcome for this introductory module is to understand the basic neurobiological impact of trauma, while respecting the rapid evolution of knowledge regarding this phenomena. The module teaches to the following learning objectives: 1. Know function of key brain parts 2. Recognize key neurotransmitter names 3. Understand that the brain develops into early adulthood 4. Describe impact of early trauma on the brain & how this may impact behavior 5. Define brain plasticity & its relationship to healing 6. To help with terminology, it is recommended that students have a printout of the summary sheet. The module consists of slides introducing the content, 9 self-assessment quiz questions with feedback for incorrect responses, and a list of references and resources for further study. The module can be used as a self-study professional development resource or to supplement an in-person course.

Material Type: Assessment, Interactive, Module

Test Module

(View Complete Item Description)

This is a test module for the Social Work Distance Education conference.  The materials are drawn from the open textbook Critical Inquiry in Social Work, adapted by Matt DeCarlo.  This book was adapted from Principles of Sociological Inquiry – Qualitative and Quantitative Methods by Susan Blackstone.  

Material Type: Module

Author: Matthew DeCarlo

Social Problems: Continuity and Change

(View Complete Item Description)

Social Problems: Continuity and Change by Steve Barkan is a realistic but motivating look at the many issues that are facing our society today. As this book’s subtitle, Continuity and Change, implies, social problems are persistent, but they have also improved in the past and can be improved in the present and future, provided that our nation has the wisdom and will to address them. It is easy for students to read a social problems textbook and come away feeling frustrated by the enormity of the many social problems facing us today. Social Problems: Continuity and Change certainly does not minimize the persistence of social problems, but neither does it overlook the possibilities for change offered by social research and by the activities of everyday citizens working to make a difference. Readers of Steve Barkan’s book will find many examples of how social problems have been improved and of strategies that hold great potential for solving them today and in the future. You will find several pedagogical features help to convey the “continuity and change” theme of this text and the service sociology vision in which it is grounded: Each chapter begins with a “Social Problems in the News” story related to the social problem discussed in that chapter. These stories provide an interesting starting point for the chapter’s discussion and show its relevance for real-life issues. Three types of boxes in each chapter provide examples of how social problems have been changed and can be changed.

Material Type: Textbook

Author: Steven Barkan

Introduction to the American Criminal Justice System

(View Complete Item Description)

This introductory textbook is unique because it was a collaborative effort by all Criminology and Criminal Justice professors at Southern Oregon University (SOU) in Ashland, Oregon. This book can be used on a quarter or semester system, as well as cover topics that may get left out of some introductory texts such as controversial issues in the criminal justice system. Further, we made it as comprehensive as possible to cover core concepts and areas in the criminal justice system including theory, policing, courts, corrections, and the juvenile justice system. Additionally, we created examples that will help make difficult concepts or ideas more relatable. Every section provides an overview of key terms, critical thinking questions for course engagement, assignments, and other ancillaries such as multimedia links, images, activity ideas, and more.

Material Type: Textbook

Authors: Alison S. Burke, Brian Fedorek, David Carter, Lore Rutz-Burri, Shanell Sanchez, Tiffany Morey

Research Methods in Psychology Ancillary Set

(View Complete Item Description)

The purpose of this project was to create a set of ancillary materials for the open textbook Research Methods in Psychology, a textbook intended to be used for psychology research methods courses. At the start of this grant, the textbook was available through the University of Minnesota’s Open Textbook Library (open.lib.umn.edu/psychologyresearchmethods/) and could be found in most open material repositories. Since this grant was proposed, however, a more recent version of the text has been released by Price, Jhangiani, Chiang, Leighton, and Cuttler (https://opentext.wsu.edu/carriecuttler/). The resources developed for this grant can be used for the new edition of the text, although they were written for the earlier version.

Material Type: Homework/Assignment

Author: Judy Orton Grissett

Introduction to Psychology Course Content

(View Complete Item Description)

Introductory psychology course developed through the Ohio Department of Higher Education OER Innovation Grant. The course is part of the Ohio Transfer Module and is also named OSS015. For more information about credit transfer between Ohio colleges and universities please visit: www.ohiohighered.org/transfer. Team Lead Vincent Granito Lorain County Community College Content Contributors Nicole Brandt Columbus State Community College Lynne Gabriel Lakeland Community College Jackie Sample Central Ohio Technical College Librarian Rachel Dilley Columbus State Community College Review Team Melissa Beers Ohio State University Brian Gerber Stark State College

Material Type: Full Course

Authors: Brian Gerber, Jackie Samle, Lynne Gabriel, Melissa Beers, Nicole Brandt, Rachel Dilley, Vincent Granito

Research Methods in Psychology

(View Complete Item Description)

Research Methods in Psychology is intended to provide a fundamental understanding of the basics of experimental research in the psychological sciences. Research Methods in Psychology adapted by Michael G. Dudley is licensed under Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 license. Research Methods in Psychology is adapted from a work produced and distributed under a Creative Commons license (CC BY-NC-SA) in 2010 by a publisher who has requested that they and the original author not receive attribution. This adapted edition is based on an adaptation produced by the University of Minnesota Libraries Publishing through the eLearning Support Initiative. This adapted edition was created by Michael G. Dudley with support from the Palomar College Foundation. This adaptation has significantly altered the original 2010 text and removed images. This work is made available under the terms of a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike license.

Material Type: Textbook

Author: Michael Dudley

Psychology

(View Complete Item Description)

Psychology is designed to meet scope and sequence requirements for the single-semester introduction to psychology course. The book offers a comprehensive treatment of core concepts, grounded in both classic studies and current and emerging research. The text also includes coverage of the DSM-5 in examinations of psychological disorders. Psychology incorporates discussions that reflect the diversity within the discipline, as well as the diversity of cultures and communities across the globe.Senior Contributing AuthorsRose M. Spielman, Formerly of Quinnipiac UniversityContributing AuthorsKathryn Dumper, Bainbridge State CollegeWilliam Jenkins, Mercer UniversityArlene Lacombe, Saint Joseph's UniversityMarilyn Lovett, Livingstone CollegeMarion Perlmutter, University of Michigan

Material Type: Full Course

World History in the Early Modern and Modern Eras (1600-Present)

(View Complete Item Description)

This course will present a comparative overview of world history from the 17th century to the present era. The student will examine the origins of major economic, political, social, cultural, and technological trends of the past 400 years and explore the impact of these trends on world societies. Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to: Think critically about world history in the early modern and modern eras; Assess how global trade networks shaped the economic development of Asia, Europe, and the Americas in the 17th and 18th centuries; Identify the origins of the Reformation and Counter-Reformation in Europe and assess the social and political consequences of these movements for the peoples of Europe; Identify the origins of the Enlightenment in Europe and assess how Enlightenment ideas led to political and social revolutions in Europe and the Americas; Identify the origins of the Scientific and Industrial Revolutions in Europe and assess how these intellectual and economic movements altered social, political, and economic life across the globe in the 18th and 19th centuries; Compare and contrast how European imperialism affected the states and peoples of Asia, Africa, and the Americas in the 19th century; Identify the origins of World War I and analyze how the war's outcome altered economic and political balances of power throughout the world; Identify the origins of totalitarian political movements across the globe in the 1920s and 1930s and assess how these movements led to World War II; Analyze how World War II reshaped power balances throughout the world and led to the emergence of the United States and the Soviet Union as global superpowers; Assess how decolonization movements in the 1950s and 1960s altered political, economic, and social relationships between the United States, the nations of Europe, and developing countries throughout the world; Assess how the end of the Cold War led to political and economic realignments throughout the world and encouraged the growth of new global markets and systems of trade and information exchange; Analyze and interpret primary source documents from the 17th century through the present, using historical research methods. (History 103)

Material Type: Assessment, Full Course, Lecture, Lecture Notes, Reading, Syllabus, Textbook

Succeeding at Your Internship: A Handbook Written for and with Students

(View Complete Item Description)

There are several textbooks for students whose majors include internships in human services, broadly defi­­­ned, such case management, counseling, criminal justice, and social work. Most of these books are written in an academic format. Typically, it involves an introduction to a theoretical orientation that concerns working with others followed by a series of chapters devoted to learning professional skills associated with a given discipline. This approach is fine, as far as it goes, but also has two drawbacks. One is that the texts are usually sold by main stream publishers, which means they are expensive. Another is that they seldom address what might be described as the experiential dimension of the internship that most beginners face on their own. This new book addresses both concerns. The fact that it is offered as a free text addresses the first issue, of course, but the second one requires a new approach. It began with asking students to talk about what they experienced when going through their first internship and what they would tell others about how to make it a successful one. That work led to a structured narrative about basic practical topics, such as finding an internship, getting started there, making effective use of supervision, understanding ethics, appreciating cultural diversity, becoming competent, and completing the internship. The text includes descriptions, suggestions, and exercises. It may be used as either a primary course text or, due to its relative brevity, a supplemental one. Although the lead editor is an experienced clinician and professor who has supervised internships for a variety of human services majors over many years, the book was written with and for students to make it more readable and more useful.

Material Type: Textbook

Author: Christopher J. Mruk

Scientific Inquiry in Social Work

(View Complete Item Description)

As an introductory textbook for social work students studying research methods, this book guides students through the process of creating a research project. Students will learn how to discover a researchable topic that is interesting to them, examine scholarly literature, formulate a proper research question, design a quantitative or qualitative study to answer their question, carry out the design, interpret quantitative or qualitative results, and disseminate their findings to a variety of audiences. Examples are drawn from the author's practice and research experience, as well as topical articles from the literature. The textbook is aligned with the Council on Social Work Education's 2015 Educational Policy and Accreditation Standards. Students and faculty can download copies of this textbook using the links provided in the front matter.

Material Type: Textbook

Author: Matthew Decarlo

Introduction to Social Work at Ferris State University

(View Complete Item Description)

This book was written by MSW students as their final project for their Capstone class. Students were each assigned a chapter of the book to write to show that they had achieved competency as a Master’s level social worker. Chapters were assigned based on student interest and experience in certain areas of the field.

Material Type: Textbook

Authors: Aikia Fricke, Ainslee McVay, Brian Majszak, Colton Cnossen, Eden Airbets, Jenae Finney, Jennifer Lamoreaux, Kassandra Weinberg, Katlin Hetzel, Keith Bogucki, Lindsey Bronold, Melissa Ryba, Micah Beckman, Sandra Tiffany, Tracey Stevens, Troy Richard, Tyler Felty

Exploring Business

(View Complete Item Description)

The author's goals in writing Exploring Business were simple: (1) introduce students to business in an exciting way and (2) provide faculty with a fully developed teaching package that allows them to do the former. Toward those ends, the following features are included in this text:1- Integrated (Optional) Nike Case Study: A Nike case study is available for instructors who wish to introduce students to business using an exciting and integrated case. Through an in-depth study of a real company, students learn about the functional areas of business and how these areas fit together. Studying a dynamic organization on a real-time basis allows students to discover the challenges that it faces, and exposes them to critical issues affecting the business, such as globalization, ethics and social responsibility, product innovation, diversity, supply chain management, and e-business.2- A Progressive (Optional) Business Plan: Having students develop a business plan in the course introduces students to the excitement and challenges of starting a business and helps them discover how the functional areas of business interact. This textbook package includes an optionalintegrated business plan project modeled after one refined by the author and her teaching team over the past ten years.3- AACSB Emphasis: The text provides end-of-chapter questions, problems, and cases that ask students to do more than regurgitate information. Most require students to gather information, assess a situation, think about it critically, and reach a conclusion. Each chapter presents ten Questions and Problems as well as five cases on areas of skill and knowledge endorsed by AACSB: Learning on the Web, Career Opportunities, The Ethics Angle, Team-Building Skills, and The Global View. More than 70% of end-of-chapter items help students build skills in areas designated as critical by AACSB, including analytical skills, ethical awareness and reasoning abilities, multicultural understanding and globalization, use of information technology, and communications and team oriented skills. Each AACSB inspired exercise is identified by an AACSB tag and a note indicating the relevant skill area.4- Author-Written Instructor Manual (IM): For the past eleven years, Karen Collins has been developing, coordinating and teaching (to over 3,500 students) an Introduction to Business course. Sections of the course have been taught by a mix of permanent faculty, graduate students, and adjuncts.

Material Type: Case Study, Textbook

Author: Karen Collins

Introduction to Business

(View Complete Item Description)

This course is designed as a survey course that will expose you to business terminology, concepts, and current business issues, with the intent of helping students develop a viable business vocabulary, foster critical and analytical thinking, and refine business decision-making skills.

Material Type: Full Course